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Cedar Rapids Gazette: Sunday, July 28, 1974 - Page 2

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   Cedar Rapids Gazette (Newspaper) - July 28, 1974, Cedar Rapids, Iowa                                 J ♦    ig  V  Weather-  Variable cloudiness, chance of thundershowers tonight. High today JHI, low tonight lower HOs. Fair and cooler Monday.  VOLl MF 1)2 NT MB KR 200  Jeane Dixon Predicts  Secs (pood iii Watergate  (In Section A)  Polo in Eastern Iowa  Action Is Fast and Hard  (In Section B)  Section  A  CITY  FINAL  35 CENTS  CEDAR RAPIDS, IOWA, SUNDAY, JULY 28. 1974  ASS( JCI AT LD PRESS, UPI, NEW YORK TIMES  Lawmakers Approve Obstruction of Justice Charge 27 to 11; Debate Goes to Full House  WASHINGTON (AP) - The I the laws be house judiciary committee rec- 1  ted . . ommended Saturday night that Richard Nixon be impeached as 37th President of the United  obstructed, and impeded ministration of justice” in Watergate cover-up.  ad-  the  amendment refining  —UPI Telephoto  REPUBLICAN MEMBERS of the house judiciary committee confer Saturday before the panel resumed its debate on impeachment. Rep. David Dennis (R-lnd.), left; Rep. Charles Sandman (R-N.J.), center; and Rep. Delbert Latta (R-Ohio) get their heads together before the historic vote.  faithfully execu-jN. J.) at precisely 6:05 p.m. IA timetable established by con-CDT.    jgressional leaders calls for the  Refined Charges    jj is    words werP  swift and for- MI house to decide the issue by  The formal roll    call in the,mal:    ‘‘Pursuant to the resolu-jlhe end of August.  .    ,    .    ,    „    .    hushed committee    room came tion.    Article One of that resolu- A majority of the house would  l V H n8 i™L r l V a n  !h’ J ust  moments    after    the    38    lion is adopted and reported to     be  required to place Nixon on  members had by a    similarly    the house.    trial in the senate where    a two-  wide margin, adopted an. Republicans • who approved  thirds vote is necessary to con .  the impeachment recommen- vict and remove him from of-  lee of lawyers    voted    27 to ll to     A| ,  2| IX , mocrats werc  j ojned Raj , sbac |(  o[  mino'is, Hamilton The committee had debated  by 6 Republicans    in affirming)Fish    of New York Lawrence, f#r four ° da ^*, sometimes court-  the article. Eleven Republicans  |  Hogan of Maryland, M. Caid-, sometimes contentious, as opposed it.    well Butler of Virginia,    William    Americana watched on    televi-  Rep. Edward Mezvinsky    (D-    Cohen of Maine, and    Harold    .i™.  or  listened on radio    Earli-  Iiowa, voted for the article. Rep IFroehlich of Wisconsin.    * “th”Member pane! oMaw-  Wiley Mayne (R-Iowa) voted Following the action, the com- vers and their staff of more against it.    mit.ee    recessed until 9:30 a.m. j ihan IOO had sVnt six mon?^  Mezvinsky, the last man on CDT Monday.  I the Democratic bench to vote!    End    of    August  Action was still to come on day night to recommend im-i yet another — and perhaps  SAN C L E M E N T E, Calif.!'* achmcnt     “     im P eachmenl    artlcles   (UPI)—President Nixon was not Mezvinsky cast the 20th aye surprised by a house judiciary which made a majority in lavor committee vote to impeach him 0 ^ impeachment. He blinked and intends to personally com- hack tears as he did so.  mand his defense in the full j    Second    Time  house, where he expects to be  vindicated, his aides said Satur- Thus, f° r  only the .second time day night    i in  the Republic’s 198 years, a  Aides said Nixon was walking  commi ttee of congress recom-.luIl    "Al    AHJJimended removal of the nation’s  highest officer.  The outcome was announced  Their faces grim, the commit- charges against Nixon.  approve a nine-part article accusing the Republican chief executive of violating his ‘‘constitutional duty to take care that  President To Direct His  because he has the least seniori-  Own Defense  ty ’ cast the deciding vote Satur ’  privately amassing volume after volume of evidence.  Finally, the first of the climatic votes on impeachment came  (Continued: Page 3, Col. 2.)  Say Turks, Greeks Near Accord  on the beach when he learned of the house judiciary committee's  vote to recommend his im- ,     n n  ,  /n   peachment for obstruction of *  Chalrman Petor Rodmo ,D ‘ justice in the Watergate cover-, up.  Text of Committee s Impeachment Article  WASHINGTON (UPI) — The following is the text of the  first article calling for the impeachment of President Nixon passed Saturday by the house judiciary committee:  assurances from Secretary oft way for wider talks on the polit-: from Cyprus and word State Kissinger early Saturday) ical future of Cyprus.    Ankara that Turkey was  In New York, the U. N.  Nixon’s press secretary in-from formed him of the vote over a wind-special telephone connection on  GENEVA, Switzerland (AP) —  Greece and Turkey adjourned  their Cyprus peace talks Satur-Z;\ h yT’T wHrDrcss'Turkev! In    New York, the U. N. Secu- ' n 8 down its    operation    on    the,the beach about    a    half-hour  day after coming close to    a    .V neWU1 P eSS  .  y l rilv    Coun . n     ’ .  Saturdav  ..island.    : after the vote was    cast    in Wash-  compromise on solving the is-  0 0 cv c  >prus cease- ire  m     complaint    from    Cyprus    The    Ankara    reports    said    troop‘ n 8 ton -  lands crisis. They planned    to    order to prevent a breakdown of     vjo|ation  , he  reinforcement    had stopped    and “The President    was    not sue-  meet again this morning.    the Geneva peace talks, a R ov -|  cease -fire bv Turkey ”     onI y resupply and maintenance prised, he had expected this out-  U. N. officials on the Mediter-ernment spokesman in Athens    *    shipments would continue. Tur-come as you know,” Deputy  ranean island said Turkish mill-  sa ^-    Await    Development    kj s ti troop strength on the island Press Secretary Gerald Warren  tary activity there had stopped. George Mavros, the Greek But on the advice of the U. S. was reliably estimated at 25.000. told reporters.  The foreign ministers    of    foreign minister, told newsmen  and     Britain,    the council ad-! Under the anticipated    Geneva  Greece and Turkey, along with in Geneva that the difficulties journed without acting to await agreement:  British delegates and an Ameri- were not in Geneva but on developments in Geneva. 'The can observer, had hoped to Cyprus. He did not elaborate.    council did not set a date    for    its! vanced from positions they held  staff<    Gen    Alexander    Hai 8-     and   meet in a final plenary session Diplomatic sources said    the    next session.     1    Proce    Q/ ' np<,,ar ' /     nnnaiw    viator  Saturday night. But this was emerging accord dealt primari-. Movement at the Geneva postponed until Sunday morning iy with means for reinforcing talks, which were reported near ‘‘in order to give the experts Monday’s cease-fire on the Med-jf a i I u re Friday    night,    was  time to continue'their work." a jterranean island and opens    the    spurred by the  Turkish forces which un  learning of the vote, Nixon returned directly to his home and conferred with his chief of  British delegation spokesman said.  Plodding Through  The spokesman said no crisis in the talks had developed, but that the experts were plodding through the difficult task of put ting together the final statement in English and translating it into French.  Official Now Lists 4 Convicts as Hostages  when the U. N.-sponsored truce  was ordered, would  place, but their new  it    "JI!    will be labeled clearly as temp-    J    V T  U. N. reports!    , .    ..    ,.» fident that the  ____ porary. Later, they would be ex-  pected to pull back to the earli- recognize that there  Press Secretary Ronald Ziegler, who then issued a brief two-sen-stay in ( ence  statement which said: positions    p res j d ent    remains    con-  full house will simply is  er positions.    not the evidence to support thus  U. N. troops, which will need or any other article of impeach-substantial reinforcement, ment and will not vote to im-would be deployed in a network peach. He is confident because of buffer zones separating Tur- he knows he has committed no kish-Cvpriot enclaves and vil- impeachable offense.”  In Washington Vice-  HUNTSYTLLE, Texas <AP> — of the convicts reportedly have lagcs from Greek Cypriots, who Four of the seven convicts bar-    weapons.    surround    them throughout the  “Even if you are in basic    Headed in a prison library since    Carrasco pulled a gun in the island,  agreement about a commune Wednesday are now considered P™ on  library just after midday    Political questions relating to  que. picking and choosing the  h( , sla(!( , s of the other thret ,  a I Wednesday, shot a guard to the a new constitution (or Cyprus  right words is extremely    dif-    p rjson  official said Saturday,  ficult.” the spokesman said.     r   Premier Constantine  That  made a total of la per-) teachers  foot and took 12 most of them  hostages — middle-aged  would be depth at  examined in greater a new meeting of the  Greek  Karamanlis received telephoned sons considered hostage, including a priest, a guard and nine civilians, authorities said.  They are held in a revolt ini-1 Rated by Fred Gomez Carrasco.i 34. an underworld narcotics, boss and three-time loser serving a life sentence for assault to murder, and by Ignacio CuevasJ 42, a convicted murderer, and Rudy Dominguez, 27, convicted of attempted murder.  Prison spokesman Hon Taylor, said the status of prisoners Ste-v e ii Robertson, Henry Es-] camilloa, Florencio Vera and Martin Cuiroz has been changed to hostage.  Carrasco and six other prisoners staved behind Wednesday when Carrasco brandished a pistol, shot a guard and took over the library.  Until Saturday, the status of four of the prisoners was unclear.  Authorities, who continued trying to bargain with the con ! victs on Saturday, have offered the inmates their freedom and pleaded with them to .surrender. The inmates’ demands have varied and the authorities’ offers have been rejected. Three  and librarians em- foreign ministers within a week  ployed by the prison system. or so.  president Ford said Saturday night that the fact that all 21 Democrats on the house judiciary committee voted to rec-o rn mend impeachment of  (Continued: Page 3. Col. 5.)  ★ ★ ★  The President  Article I  In his conduct of the office of President of the United States, Richard M. Nixon, in violation of his constitutional oath faithfully to execute the office of President of the United States and. to the best of his ability, preserve, protect, and defend the Constitution of the United States, and in violation of his constitutional duty to take care that the laws be faithfully executed, has prevented, obstructed, and impeded the administration of justice, in that:  On June 17, 1972, and prior thereto, agents of the Committee for the Re-clection of the President committed unlawful entry of the headquarters of the Democratic national committee in Washington. District of Columbia, for the purpose of securing political intelligence. Subsequent thereto, Richard M. Nixon, using the powers of his high office, engaged personally and through his subordinates and agents in a course of conduct or plan designed to delay, impede and obstruct investigations of such unlawful entry; to cover up. conceal and protect those responsible and to conceal the existence and scope of other unlawful covert activities.  The means used to implement this course of conduct or plan have included one or more of the following:  (1) Making or causing to be made false or misleading statements to lawfully authorized investigative officers and employes of the United States.  (2) Withholding relevant and material evidence or information from lawfully authorized investigative officers and employes of the United States.  (3) Approving, condoning, acquiescing in, aud counseling witnesses with respect to the giving of false or misleading statements to lawfully authorized investigative officers and employes of the United States and false or misleading testimony in duly instituted judicial and congressional proceedings.  (4) Interfering or endeavoring to interfere with the conduct of investigations by the department of justice of the United States, the Federal Bureau of Investigation, the office of  (Continued: Page 3, Col. I )  Hills Man Dies in Coralville Crash  CORALVILLE - Jerry Wayne Graham. 20. of Hills. Iowa, was killed Saturday evening in a car-motoreycle accident on highway 6 in Coralville.  Coralville police said the accident happened at about 6:40 p m. near the entrance to the Coralville sawmill.  Police raid Graham was riding a motorcycle in the left westbound lane of the highway when a pickup truck driven by Frank Peterman. 68. of rural Marion, turned left in front of the motorcycle from the right westbound lane.  police said Graham apparently swerved to avoid a collision, but the vehicles struck in the eastbound lane and he was thrown from the motorcycle. He was pronounced dead on arrival at an Iowa City hospital.  Peterman was charged with making an improper left turn.  Doar Document Claims Nixon Failed To Act  Today's Index  By David K. Rosenbaum  New York Times Service  WASHINGTON - Proof of President Nixon’s complicity in the Watergate cover-up lies not only in his overt actions but also in his failure to take action* that might have brought the facts of the case to light, according to a document given to members of the house judiciary committee The document, prepared by John Doar, special counsel for the impeachment inquiry, lists 50 ‘‘undisputed incidents" that, Doar said, show that the President must have “made a decision” to join the cover-up.  Only such a decision, Doar stated, could explain the pattern of the President’s action and inaction “that otherwise cannot be explained.”  The document was prepared to substantiate the allegation in the committee’s proposed lirst impeachment article that the President obstructed jus-  Watcrgate case “course of con-  tice in the through his duct.”  Doar’s analysis was written hurriedly and was not meant to be an official committee document. It was intended instead as a check-off list for committee members in Saturday’s debate.  Republicans argued that the allegations in the impeachment articles are not backed by specific charges of wrongdoing.  Among the 50 items on Doar’s list are many now-familiar statements in the transcripts of Nixon’s Watergate conversations, such as his remark on March 31, 1973, that “we should buy the time” by meeting demands from E. Howard Hunt, the convicted Watergate conspirator.  Other items cite such actions as the President’s giving a $36,(XXV a-year government job to Jeb Stuart Magruder,  the former campaign director, who committed perjury at the original Watergate trial.  But what many committee members who support impeachment found most interesting in the document was that Doar had pulled together what many consider to be the repeated failures of the President to take steps that these members believe might reasonably have been taken if the President had not been part of the cover-up.  Among these items were the following:  The President’s actions on June 20. 1972, his first working day in the White House following the Watergate burglary, which had occurred three days before.  The President did not participate in the morning meeting among H. IL Haldeman, John Mitchell, John Ehrlich-man, Richard Kleindienst and  John Dean at which the burglary was discussed.  After the meeting. Nixon did not ask for a report from Ehrlichman, his chief domestic adviser, who had been assigned to handle the case for the White House  When Mitchell, then campaign director, told Nixon that he was sorry he had not kept better control of the campaign staff, Nixon did not ask him what he meant or ask for the details of what had happened.  L. Patrick Gray, then acting director of the FBI, told the President on July 6. 1972. that Nixon was in jeopardy of being ‘‘mortally wounded” by members of the White House staff. Nixon did not heed the warning.  Dean then White House legal counsel, told Nixon on March 13, 1973, that his campaign treasurer, Hugh Sloan, wanted to "cleanse his soul by  confession” and that the Pres-i d e n t ’ s chief fund-raisers, Maurice Stans and Herbert Kalmbach, were trying to get Sloan to "settle down.” Nixon took no action after hearing that from Dean,  Also on March 13. Dean told the President that White House aide Gordon Strachan had lied to the authorities about his knowledge of the Watergate burglary Again, the President did not act  Dean told the President on March 21 that he, Haldeman, Ehrlichman, and Mitchell had all obstructed justice. Nixon  (Continued: Page 3, Col. 7.)  lo cf <11/Vs Chuckle  The accent today may be wholly on youth hut the stress is definitely on parents.  Corm  SECTION A     Late News    1. J. H      City Hall Notes    2      Deaths    I      Editorials    M      SECTION    B      iowa News Television Tabla    14, W      You and Iowa    I      Marion    I      Food    a      Financial    MI      New York Stocks    ........... ti      Building    IMI      Movies    .. IMT      Record Reviews    IT      Farm ., ,.    IM*      Frank Nye's Political    Notes 29      SECTION C      Social    1-22      Around the Town    J      New Books    I      Travel    * ...... ll      SECTION    0      Sports    II      Outdoor Iowa    ....... I      Want Ads    MI      Crossword ........ ...    ............ IS      Parade Madonna .    I ta      Comics    14      

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