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Cedar Rapids Gazette: Sunday, July 28, 1974 - Page 10

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   Cedar Rapids Gazette (Newspaper) - July 28, 1974, Cedar Rapids, Iowa                                 The Special Gift for the . Special Occasion  The Cedar Rapids Gazette: Sun., July 28, 197 4    5A  Killian’s Lindale PJaza, Cedar Rapids and Mall Shopping Center, Iowa City  OPEN SUNDAY  12:00 TO 5:00 PM  S -K*  •    ■ ’    ■  / •    * - . / .. () r  , ' .■ ■ •  ■ i    AAT    ‘Z&Xt-r'i.v  SANTA ROSA  MONDAY HOURS, CEDAR RAPIDS: KILLIAN'S DOWNTOWN  Pf* fim '    #•    ‘  9:30 A.M. to 9:00 P.M. .. LINDAU NOON to 9:00 P.M.  ■    ’' ..vv’' T    ,.*»    v 1 '    V.'    «    .•    ^    **    "    ^    ,  MALL SHOPPING CENTER, IOWA CITY: 10:00 A.M. to 9:00 P.M.  / HOLTON  SMULEKOFF’S  Jewelry Department,Main Floor  YOUR AUTHORIZED KEEPSAKE JEWELER  TWA. M„» K,,  □ONEIDA  Downtown Paikade Bi Tiding   Killians__  The look of lace without the care! slight irregulars  Easy Care Vinyl Lace Tablecloths  VALUES TO 7.00 IF PERFECT  100% vinyl lace tablecloths give you the elegance without the time consuming care. Slightly irregular tablecloths come in solid white, ecru or gold tones. Completely machine washable . . . never need ironing! And, they protect the finest table finishes. Several sizes. No mail or phone orders.  Cedar Rapids: Aisle Bar, Downtown Street Floor Downstairs Budget Store Lindale Budget Shop Iowa City: Mall Shopping Cantor on Six at Sycamore  Tax  Mailing Property Tax Refunds; Deadline Near  By Dale Kueter  The first refund checks under Iowa’s new property tax relief program for the elderly were scheduled to be mailed late last week.  Mike Cox, an administrator in the property tax division of the Iowa department of revenue in Des Moines, said some 35,000 claims have been filed so far.  Wednesday, July 31, is the deadline for persons to file such claims on property taxes paid last year.  As of Jan. I, Iowans 65 and older and those totally disabled became eligible for a refund on a portion of property tax paid on their owned residence or rent constituting property tax paid if total household income did not exceed $6,000.  If two or more persons occupying a homestead qualify for the reimbursement, only one may file a claim. Also to qualify, the individual must have  lived in Iowa all of 1973, and at the time the claim is made.  The maximum refund is 95 permit of the actual, out-of-pocket taxes paid in 1973 (owed for the year 1972) for those with total income of less than $1,000.  The refund percentage drops to a base of 25 percent for those with total income less than $6,000. Social security received must be included as income.  The refund checks, which bv law must he issued by the state by Sept. 25, are being made out to both tho claimant and the county treasurer in home-owner cases, and just to the claimant in rent cases.  Cox said the 35,000 claims filed represent slightly more than one-third of the estimated number who are eligible.  The reason for the low number of claims filed, he explained, is that many of those eligible took the so-called double homestead credit on taxes paid last year.  Home owners in Iowa are allowed a $62.50 homestead credit against property taxes, with an extra $62.50 allowed for those 65 and older. The latter credit was repealed when the new property tax relief program became effective Jan. I.  Cox said his office has been I advising persons to file a claim under the new' law this: year only if tho relief provided is greater than the second $62.50  1  credit.  If eligible persons received the equivalent in form of the additional homestead, there can be no reimbursement under the new law, Cox explained.  Forms for the property tax rebate are available at all county assessor and treasurer offices; at Iowa department of revenue offices; and at the 19 city assessor offices in Iowa.  The Iowa department of revenue office in thus area is at 736M> Eleventh street, Marion.  2 Are Promoted At Mt. Mercy  Promotion appointments and leave of absence awards for Mt.. Mercy college faculty mem liers have been announced by Mt. Mercy president Sister Mary Agnes Hennessey.  Two faculty members have been promoted in rank for the 1974-75 academic year. Dr. Anne K. Stenzel was promoted to associate professor of social work, and Dr. Edward Peters was promoted to assistant professor of biology.  Leave of absence awards were granted to Charles Barth, art, land Toni Clow, nursing, for graduate study during the 1974 75 academic year. Barth will complete work for a doctorate in art history from Illinois State university and Mrs. Clow will study for a master’s degree in nursing at the University of Iowa.  Nathan Nassif, chairman of the speech department, will also take a leave of absence during the coming school year to do creative writing.  Gifts, Pledges Top Coe Goal of $4,000,000  The Priority Program, Coe college's three-year capital funds campaign, ended June 30 with gifts and pledges totaling $4,004,632 against total goals of $4,000,000, according to B. D. Silliman, Cedar Rapids, national campaign chairman.  Launched in 1971, in response to the pledge of $1.5 million from the family of the late Sutherland C. Dows to erect a fine arts center, the Priority Program had two goals. The first was to raise $3,000,000 for the renovation of older campus buildings and for current operating budget support for the three  were used for annual budget support and the renovation of Hickok hall, Kby firehouse, Greene hall, and portions of Sinclair auditorium and Voorhees hall.  Payment Is Finn Tactic Of Inflation  HELSINKI (UFO - The Finnish government gave forestry industry managers an ultimatum as they began their annual July holiday — hand over 300 million Finnmarks ($82 million) peacefully or the government would take it.  A government spokesman! said, “We had to do something I publicly to show everyone that the government was doing something to fight inflation before everyone went on hob-1 day.” That brought the collective response from the forestry' jM-ople of “why us?”  Finland has an annual 17 percent rate of inflation when five years ago it was between 2-3 percent. Last year the trade deficit was 1.995 billion marks! ($545 million) and preliminary! figures show it could double this year.  Everyone agreed something had to be done but the four par-! ties in government could not I agree on the cure. The Social! Democrats, the largest party,! I promoted higher import taxes j i and a IO percent re-evaluation: against the dollar. But the other, parties in government would not! center dedicated in May, andiPriority goal of $3,000,000 for go along, government and foundations renovation of older buildings The Conservatives, the cham-grants for non-Prionty Program and annual budget support. pions of business and industry,! projects.    “That    problem    has    been made are not in the government, so  Coe President Leo L. Nubs- even more serious because in- industry was an easy target for baum responded to the an- nation has made a shambles of the government to hit.  Want ads will seek out sellers I of items you want. Dial 398-8234.  A total of $1,205,904 was given nouncement of the Priority Pro- our renovation cost estimates    The government said it cs-  or pledged toward the second gram results by saying, “Coe made in 1971,” She added.    timated the price of wood prod-  priority of additional endowment.  In addition to the Priority Pro-  is deeply grateful to the many alumni, parents and other friends of Coe who gave so gen-  gram, other gifts and grants lo jerously to this important cam-Coe separate from the Priority Ipaign.”    i  Program from foundation and “Such a measure of support,” government sources totaled $1,- he added, “given at a time when  Nussbaum announced that solicitation of gifts for the remod  583.623 in the three-year period Thus, the grand total of gifts, grants and pledges to Coe for  years of the campaign. The all purposes from both private second was the addition of and government sources, totaled $1,000,000 to the Coe endowment. I $7,213,255 for the three-year A total of $2,798,728 has been period from July 1,1971, through given or pledged toward the June 30. 1974. This figure in-first priority goal by alumni,!dudes Priority Program gifts, parents, trustees, and other the Dows family gifts for the friends of the college. The gifts Sutherland C. Dows Fine Arts  Concert Tonight at Ellis  A medley of tunes made popu-i Selections that the band will lar by The Beatles will be in- present include:  “March of the Steel Mon'’ by  colleges have lost some of their glamor and when higher education in general was in trouble, is doubly significant. It gives Coe a position of strength and stability when those qualities are preciously rare on the col-  cluded in the free Cedar Rapids municipal band concert tonight at 8 at Ellis park. The band, under the direction of guest conductor Luman Oilton, 276 Peace  Belsterling; ‘‘Chorale and Shaker Dance” by Zdechlik; the concert march “Block M” by avenue NW, will present a Lon- Bilik; the Sousa march “Man-non-McCartney “Portrait” ar-h att an Beach”, “La Bella ranged by Holcombe.    Roma” by Cacavas; “Entry of  Sentimental ballads and corn- the Gladiators”, a march by ball comedy will also be pre- Fucik; “Julida”, a polka by sented by a male barbershop Grill and “The Battle Hymn of quartet, The Certain “D’s”. The the Republic” arranged by group is comprised of Dave Ployhar.  Bryant (bass), Dick Kruse    *    * *  (baritone), Dean Kruse (tenor)! Colton, this week's guest conand Chuck Worsfold (lead). ductor, is director of the Jeffer-Worsfold, who is also a son high school band, member of the ‘ Westminster 1  He has played trombone and [ Presbyterian church choir, will French horn in the municipal perform a solo, “Some Enchant- band for 17 years and presently ed Evening” by Rodgers, during serves as librarian for the band.  I ham P. Whipple, Western U.S. chairman; Russell F. Knapp, Eastern U.S. chairman; and C.  I J. Lynch, deferred gifts chair-! man.  DRIVE SAFELY  Luman Colton  from Cornell college and Northwestern university. He is a past president of the Iowa Band-  PLACE SETTING  SALE  the concert.  Colton has degrees in music I masters’ Assn.  In the light of this shortage, ucts would increase 68 percent  this year, paper prices 51 percent, and cellulose 38 percent. It  eling of Carnegie Science hall claimed the increases worsened on the Coe campus for academ- inflation and the industry could ic and administrative uses would either hand over 300 million continue among special pros- marks by Feb. 15, 1975, or the, peds.    government would impose an  “A good share of the money export levy this year to collect necessary to renovate Carnegie the funds.  Science hall is in hand,” said p or  political reasons, the gov-Nussbaum. We will continue eminent hoped the industry — | our efforts to raise the full the country’s largest — would j amount needed since the space choose the voluntary method.  loge scene.    ij s  essential and the building!rTTcTTvaiiTo  Nussbaum “o KE     s “" d ”    SHSTi  that we did not make our First    Tutl    a" 0t  *  voluntar T  The Bank   -Homey and Coe trustee, was as-  0 f finland has raised doubts  •    sisted    in campaign leadership whether the export levy would   ,ho  following Coe trustees:  ( h e  legal under existing regula-  Kobert C. Armstrong, national     t j onS)  ^ut the government re-  iT    Wk    leadership gifts chairman; Wil-    , iod thr bank was  meddling in  m    m    Ham B. Quarton. <edar Rapids     mics and should kccp out .  JU    Mb    'and Linn county chairman; Wil- 11   Ivong Bridge  The cities of Rio de Janeiro and Niteroi in Brazil, are linked across Guanabara bay by nearly nine miles of bridge, the fifth-longest in the world.  Diamond* from $100  Diamond* are the  gift "f  > tore.  When you give a Keepsake, you make tho occasion doubly spacial, because there is no finer diamond ring. Keopsako’S famous Guarantee Is your assurance of perfect clarity, fine white color and precise cut.  Take Months to Pay. I sc Smulekoffs Budget Account.  Open Munday Night ’iii 9  SAVE ON COMMUNITY* SILVERBLATT. BY ONEIDA  5-PIECE PLACE SET! ING  (REG. 21.75)  Each Place Setting Contains:  Salad Fork, Place Fork, Place Knife, 2 Teaspoons.  4-PI CCC SERVING SET 15.00  (REG. 20.75) Contacts:  I Tiblaspoon I Sugar Spoon I Butt•< Knit*  I Piaread Tibltipoon  / 4-PIECE  1  HOSTESS SET '    22.50  (REG. 31.50) Coolants:  I Dassart Sarvff I Cold Mot toik I Gravy L«v>  I Cassare!* Spoon  ALSO SAVE ON MATCHING COMPLETER SETS   

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