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Cedar Rapids Gazette Newspaper Archive: July 19, 1974 - Page 10

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Publication: Cedar Rapids Gazette

Location: Cedar Rapids, Iowa

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   Cedar Rapids Gazette (Newspaper) - July 19, 1974, Cedar Rapids, Iowa                                10 The Odar Rapids Gazette: I-ri., July 19. 1974 Television Today Bv Jav Sharbutt Radio Siation Phones Convicts YORK (APi The played the taped conversa- mini ii the talking siarted at p.m. on .Kir. 11, WASH nous director Bill McCloskey recalled, sonvwlrr ineivdn- lonsly. he In ard the convicts "negotiating back and forth on what their policy would iv." The men, i'Y.ank (iurhaiM. jr.. and Robei" X ear- had seha-ri eight hostages a fvHbloek in a federal eourthmise i n Washington. Through newsmen, the con- victs demanded freedom in return for their captives' sale release. They freed one hos- tage Friday. The oilier seven escaped Sunday and the convicts were recaptured Monday night after a Shootout with police in which no one was hit. McCloskey said his station was the first to contact the convicts during the tense, po- tentially bloody ordeal. He said ho looked in the phone book, found a number for the cellblock and simply called up. And once he had the men on the phone, the station didn't relinquish the line unless the convicts or hostages requested it. WASH got off the line for good Sunday at the request of federal officers, he said. The cellblock had three phones, he added, "and at one time we were talking simulta- neously on all three to either hostages or convicts. And once we realized that, we hung up one of them because we never wanted to block the authorities' access to the cellblock by phone." He said WASH, when the convicts or hostages consent- ed, taped interviews with (hem for its news broadcasts, but either offered the talks live for other newsmen who came to the station or re- Alter the 105-hour drama ended. IVpuiy Ally. (Ion. l-.iurt'iuv Siiberman said that M avert bloodshed "the main inrus! of our was to keep them ithe convicts! talk- ing ;uui nur main ally the press." Mi'Clnskey who said WASH kepi iis tivc-membti'r staff in shifts to keep iis line open, noted lha! when the coiiviris asked tile station ID hang up "they called us bark He attributed this in largo part !u she telephone rapport Chrif a Washington newspaperman, liad built up j with the men during the early stapes of their' escape at- tempt The authorities didn't inter- fere with the station's phone link, McCloskey observed, but I he said lie regretted getting off the phone Sunday at the request of federal officers. "We gave up ihe line, but it frankly troubled us later be- cause we thought, 'we're let- ting the government decide what we do he said. ''So we started plac- ing calls back there." It didn't work. He said the phone company, at the gov- i ernment's request, had cut off calls to the cellblock and only allowed outgoing calls there. Even after that, Gorham called WASH three times, he added. All the calls were brief and all were cut off by the auth- orities. McCloskey said. The last came at about 1 p.m. Monday, eight hours before the men were captured by police. During one call just before 6 a.m. Mondayj he added, a WASH staffer had to explain to Gorham. who was; cutting off the calls "because he was very unhappy with us. He thought we'd deserted him. "He kept emphasizing he i was giving us an exclusive on this." !Blood Deliveries Cut Back; Banks Have Shortages DKS M01NF.S (APi The Community Blood Bank of Cen- tra! Iowa in lies Moincs has had io cut b.K'k Ui iu'.-pi- i! senCs because of a short- age in human blood at l.'iners.sy aospl'als in Iowa. are concerniii their bkuxi bank may r.ot be able to fill their needs. .lames Holland, director of the DOS Moiiies-based blood bank, said, however, no hospital has been forced to cancel a .-urgen, yet due to an inadequate blood supply or e'.M' tiia.t drastic. Hi1 said iho (iloeii >uiipiy las! doun ironi tile nor- mal 70 pints to Mi. Seme blood banks were contaeiej iii Ne- braska and Missouri for help, he said, but they were ex- Dei'ieiK'ing an even v.or.-e situa- tion. The blood bank serves hospi- tals in Wiiiterset, Osceola. Webster City. Condon and Des Moines. Similar problems are being faced in Iowa City. Mike I.-eisch, chief technician at the I'niversi- iy of Iowa clinic's blood said that facility lias sought relief from out-of-state facilities. However. Leisch said many out-of-stale suppliers are ''acing shortages in their local commu-i nities and aren't able to ship' much excess blood to Iowa City. But in other parts of the slate.! no shortage is being experi- enced. Blood banks in nubuquc.j Waterloo, Oitumwa and Sioux; City report adequate supplies. White House Forces j Out OEO Head Early: WASHINGTON' Alvini Arnett. who was forced to re- sign as director of the Office of; Economic Opportunity, was no-i tified Thursday that his resig-: nation was accepted, effective! at p.m. CDT. j Arnett had submitted his res- ignation earlier this week, effec- tive July 31. But the notification of acceptance from lhe White! House, signed by presidential! counselor Dean Burch. set the earlier dale of July 18, an OEO source said. jEwoldt: Area Economic Growth Should Continue The first six months of the year show "good economic progress for the Cedar liapicis Marion area." according to Harold Kwoldl. asst. executive vice-president of the Chamber. -if Commerce He uu' resident uork now sU'.isis .11 an of 1.600 over a year ago. Total employment numbers' a gain of 2.500. "The increase in total resi- solid gain for the Kwokit commented. I'nemulotmcn! Same rnemployment in the Cedar liapids metropolitan area is 2.5 percent, the same as last year. Commercial construction dur-' ing the first half of con- tinues to match ihat of a year Drive Starts in WhatCheerfor j Medical Office WHAT CHEER Volunteer workers began canvassing this week on the fund for Dr. M. Lee McClcnahan, who plans to begin practice in What Cheer. Funds donated will be used for the purchase of the Ancil Farrow property, remodeling the property for suitable medi- cal offices and for one nurse's salary for six months. The nurse will be on duty on a t'ulltime basis, with the doctor in the office on a rotating half-day basis. He also will be available for emergency calls. If community participation is good, Dr. McClenahan will ob- tain a partner who might live in What Cheer. W h a t Cheer Lions club members and Tri-County Jay. cees are heading the fund drive. Eleven Cars Derail CHARITON (UPI) Eleven cars of a Burlington North- j ern coal train derailed near here Thursday night. No injur- ies were reported. ago, Kwokit went on. adding that 1973 was a record year. Tile first six months of com- mercial construction permits to- taled well over J6.5 million, with industrial construction permits of si 2 million. Apartment construction pi-r- miis for the first half of 1074 hi; million, with 224 new units scheduled for construction. Per- mits for 120 single family homes, valued at million. New Families Kwoldt added that "major construction projects are in evi- dence in all parts of the Cedar Rapids area, including the .downtown area." He said "all indications point to a continuation of this eco- nomic progress for lhe second half of the year. An important factor is that families moved into the community in' the first .six months. j he continued, "many of our major industries have nounccd plans for future expan- sion or are in the process of car-' rying out plans announced last year." Ewoldt discussed these figures at a Kiwanis meeting Thursday night and again Friday noon all a meeting of the Catholic Lay- men. Coe Second Summer Term Enrollment Up Enrollment for the second ses-; sion of the summer term at Coe college is up 34 percent over last year, continuing the in- crease begun first session when totals jumped 35 percent. Registration figures for this year's second summer session, which began July 15, show 142] class registrations compared j with 94 in the second session' last. year. Total enrollment for both ses-j sions of lhe summer term this year is 538, compared with 387 last year. Three Grades Are Added to Project EXPO Open enrollment in Project K.XPO at Creek elemen tary school has been extended to include fourth, as fifth and sixth grade students, for the 1974-75 school year. otuiietiu> iiuill tiiiS mini' rU meniary school in the Cedar Rapids Community school dis- trict may enroll in Project EXPO, with free bus transpor- tation provided by the district. Project EXPO stands for "ex- panded opportune and emphasizes individualized mathematics and reading pro- grams. The math instruction is close- ly allied to Project BASIC math, and reading i.s taught in a new "systems" program which stresses mastery of skills and relies heavily on library use. EXPO features extensive use of community resources for mini-courses and field trips, which are planned cooperatively by students and staff. To enroll a child in the pro- gram or to obtain more infor- mation, parents should tele- phone Squaw Creek Principal Bill Quinby, 398-2113. Nominations Open For Olin Board OL1M Two directors of the Olin Consolidated School district. Donald Starry and Rich a r d (Irafft, have announced they, will not seek re-election. Nomination papers Ifor 'the three-year terms are available from District Secretary A. R. Lawson, and must be returned to the Jones county auditor's of- fice by 5 p.m. Aug. I. Community Center Land I Grant Okayed by Council The CVriar Kapids urban rone- 1 i-st to near wni, said Robert board met in a special iisMsUinl director in meeting Thursday lo approve a department nf planning k federal elnse-out grant' on the unsold land upon which a community center is proposed. Private Audit Hi I) ami tin- city w nidi oruvidcii for the momA to cover iand which had not been of 'lu sold was approved by the board local Neighborhood Develop- and passed on for the city conn- Project i.NDI'i and Cedar cil's approval at a specially- project be expanded Necessary The federal mone'v is neces- sarv to ,lV anticipated net' cost .He IM.1 project. more familiarly known as he community center project. The net cost is the result of subtract- ing revenue gained by selling the land from the total cos! of the renewal project. Rut since this land had not yet been sold the federal dosc-oul grant was needed to cover the potential sale price of the land. The special meetings of the ren- ewal board and city council were necessitated because a Hl'D lawyer discovered only Wednesday afternoon that no provision 'had been made in the contract lor a close-out grant. The city had been paying about per day in interest for a loan on the unsold land- The grant will reduce the inter- Television Listings 7_KWWl-TV, Waterloo 8-WKBT, La 9-KCRG-TV, Cedar Rapids 1 0-KROC-TV, 2-WMT-TV, Cedar Ropids 1 2-KIIN-TV, owa 3-KTVO, Ollumwo 1 3-WHO-TV, Des 4-WH8F-TV, Rock Island 40-KDUB, 6-WOCTV, creature "Mole Jelsons Superstar Movie Last Midnight Special 10-Midnight 2-Fat Albert '7-fJews, Weather, Sots. 9-Wild Wild West Action Hews 3-News, Weather, Sots. News, Weather, 4-Country Fat Albert Go 3-Fat Albert 10-Go 13-Go 6-6 O'Clock Edition News, Weather, Spts. Aviation Weather 13-Evcwitness News Nashville Summer 7-Hce 2-To Tell 3-Price Is Right 4-Wild Wild West Hollywood Sauares ft-Dlrtv Sally TO-Dustv's Trail Lidsville Buqs Bunny 2-Halr Beor Bunch Bugs Bunnv Hair Bear Bonanza "9-Bandstond Children's Film, Festival Bandstand 4-Children's Film 13 Hee Haw Cor and 8-Hair Bear Laredo Children's Film Bugs Wrestling 2-Dirty Sally Rrady Bunch 6-Sanfordand Son 8-Lowrence Welk 7--Addams Family Yogi's Gang Sabrina Bandstand 10-NFLAction Twins-Ticjers 12-To Be Announced Brady 7-Basebnll- '7-Brinn Addoms Family Addoms Family Yogi's Earth Loh Roller Game Lassie Gooil 3-Six Million Man -i-Good Emergency Super Sricin a Gift" 12-Waii Street Week 13-Brian Keith Six Million Friends Scoobv-Doo Alhletics-lndians TV Super World C6S "Sweet Ride" CBS Movie High High Ride'' 6-N8C "Silent Hiqn 13-irK.n in Ahdenp Yoyru.i "Atomic Cil; ImococOmcnt Snowcose Three "Silent and Cheer -0 Odd and Gcif Gc'f Modern TV Pink Pink wnrid of SpK. Weather. of soti. sZ Without Sun' News' Weather, Y Unlan-.efj World Speed 6iS Con'.unatinn World of Spis. Soccd lO-Siar "In'vis'fiip Mar -To fio Announced Revpr.se" -.30 7- 8ul  Tile total cost n! the MDP audit will be while the cost of the Cedar Lake project will be State Opens July 28 DF.S M01NES (I'm The Iowa Capitol will again be open on Sundays to visitors beginning later this month. Officials said the Capitol will be open from 8 a.m. untl 4 p.m. on Sundays beginning .luly 23. The statehouse had been closed to the public because of the energy shortage and securi- tv reasons in recent months. Pick flue SATURDAY N1TE Dine Dance to the music of the COUNTY LINEMEN SUNDAYDINNEF SMORGASBORD Served 1 2 Noon to p.m Fried Chicken, Horn, Roast Beef and all Ihe trimmings including pio for desseit. Adults Children under 12 WENDY OAKS COUNTRY LODGE 6 Miles North of Springville For reservations coll 854-6148 m "The Good, Bed Ugly" FRI.andSAT. Meet your friends for Fun, Drinks and Dancing Open 2 p.m. 'til 2 a.m. 172416th Ave.SW SERVING NIGHTLY CHOICE PRIME RIB OF BEEF Appearing At The Keyboard MARY PIKE Nightly except Fri. (JUST A UTTIE BIT BETTER) 310 THIRD AVENUE SE, DOWNTOWN TELEPHONE 362-8679 LAMP SUNDAY NOON TO 10 P.M. Convenient parking in our ramp QPEM 24 Hours a Day! Complete Breakfast (24 Hours) Luncheon Dinner 365 33rd Ave, S.W. at 1-380 1 Block East of Jack Jones Furniture. CHICAGO CUBS vs. 7: LIVE from Riverfront Stadium "We want to be there when you "Many of you have told our reporters and me that is too early for you to home to watch TV news. We want to te there when you are, so we're moving up to We won't change the way news i.s presented, just the time. We invite those of you who have been joining us at lomakc the with us." Eyewitness News Moves Up-To July 29 Sid KCIU1 News Director UPER July 19, THE NIGHT CHICAGO DIED ROCK YOUR BABY DON'T LET THE SUN GO DOWN ON ME ROCK THE BOAT ROCK ME GENTLY WATERLOO RIKKI, DON'T LOSE THAT NUMBER LAMPLIGHT WILD THING BAND ON THE RUN AIR DISASTER BE THANKFUL FOR WHAT YOU GOT WHAT'S YOUR NAME I'M LEAVING IT UP TO YOU FOREVER YOUNG WILDWOOD WEED SURE AS I'M SITTING HERE ANNIE'S SONG TRAVELING BOY CALL ON ME FEEL LIKE MAKIN' LOVE CAMPFIRE GIRL COME MONDAY TRAIN OF THOUGHT SUGAR BABY LOVE SHININ' ON WORKIN' AT THE CAR WASH BLUES SAVE THE LAST DANCE FOR ME THE AIR THAT I BREATHE YO YO MAN 1974 Paper Lace 1 George McCrae 3 Elton John 5 The Hues Corporation 2 Andy Kim 11 Abba 6 Steely Dan 4 David Essex 9 Fancy 7 Paul McCartney Wings 8 Albert Hammond 15 William De Vaughn 13 Andy and David Williams 28 Don Marie Osmond 24 Joan Baez 27 Jim Stafford HB Three Dog Night 19 John Denver 10 Garfunkel 20 Chicago 21 Roberta Flack 22 Jim Snowbarger 17 Jimmy Buffet! 14 Cher 16 Rubettes HB Grand Funk HB Jim Croce 29 De Franco Family 12 The Hollies 18 Rick Cunha 23 HIT-BOUND I SHOT THE SHERIFF Eric Clapton I LOVE MY FRIEND Charlie Rich TAKIN1 CARE OF BUSINESS Bachman-Turner Overdrive BEACH BABY First Class Record! listed on tha KCRG RADIO 1600 "Supor 30" aro inlected by KCRG after evaluating and considering record sales, listener requests and thn station's own opinion of their audience appual. Sale or resale of this survey Is prohibited.   

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