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   Cedar Rapids Gazette (Newspaper) - July 16, 1974, Cedar Rapids, Iowa                                g The Odar Rapids Gazette: Tues.. July 16. 1974 Dame Sybil Hathaway: Benevolent Dictator .SARK, Channel Islands IAP) Michael Branmimt. the new Seigneur of Sark. pledged Monday to try to keep his tiny Channel island a trouble-free 19th Century paradise following the death the Damp of Sark "The last thing 1 want to iio is drag the island into the 20th he declared. Beaumont, a 47-year-old aerospace engineer, became the ruler of Britain's smallest and oldest dependency on the death Sunday of his grandmother, the legendary Dame Sybil Hatha- way. She was the 21st in the line of seigneurs, though being .1 uoni.ii: her was La Danu- Danie Sybil died at the age of after ruling the liny is- land off the Normandy coast for 47 years, shunning oc- cupation forces, automobiles, labor unions, divorce and in- come, cigaret and liquor taxes. She insisted on keeping it "a place nf peace and quiet" for the population, which now toials about BOO, and the Imirists it attracts annually To Change Nothing Beaumont said he will quit his job as a de- sign engineer with the British Aircraft Corp. anil move his family from Bristol, England, to the 12-bedroom Seigneune on the island. "I want to change he said. "1 hope to keep the island just as my grandmother kept it: peaceful, quiet and a beautiful place to live." Sark is 3'-_. miles long and l'-> miles wide. Queen beth 1 granted it to Holier de Carteret, the first seigneur, in 1563 with instructions to populate it. He estimated a system of feudal government that has since been modified to include a 52-member local legislature called the Chief Pleas. But the seigneur is the final local authority and is answerable only to Queen Elizabeth II and her privy council. Dame Sybil was a feisty woman who fought all her life to keep the more troublesome aspects of modern life out of her island domain. No Divorces There isT hardly any crime; a two-man police force and a jail built for two is adequate. Divorces are not granted, and the only motorized vehicles are the tractors on some [arms and the electric wheelchair the Dame permitted herself in recent years because of arthritis. But there are telephones and electricity. "We're not averse to the comforts of modern she said. Only the Dame could keep pigeons so the flock would not grow large enough to threaten the crops. Only she could keep a bitch so that the island would not be overrun by dogs. Only she could mill corn; she could also call on every male islander over 16 to work two days a year on the few miles of roads. "If I'm a dictator, I'm certainly a benevolent she once said. "I prefer to regard myself as head of one big happy family with the queen as my overlord." Oklahoma Woman Rules As First Indian Chief La Dame of Sark, the only feudn! ruler of the British Isles, died Sun- day at her home. She was 90 years old. She is shown here with her dog on the grounds of her home in 1 959. Dame Sybil had ruled the 600 inhabitants of Sark, one of the Channel Islands, for the past 47 years. By Kay McCartbv STROUD. Okla. (DPI) Schevnirter wears th" j Sac and Fox beaver headdress as the first woman Indian -.-hicf in Oklahoma She quit a high paying job I in the Bureau of Indian Af- fairs she held for nine years to i become Sac and chief. I Now she is paid the federally I allowed minimum wage of I 25 an Imiir. At the end of her first year I as chief of the small tribe that j is located in Oklahoma, Kansas and Iowa, she presid- j ni over a weekend pnw-wow al i the tribal grounds five miles south of Stroud. i Mrs. Schexnider. married to a civil engineer, spends only part of her time on tribal af- fairs and maintains her people need a full-time chief to revive their heritage. Claim Money She started action on claim money that was appropriated by congress but never paid and has begun plans for a new community building on the tribal grounds. She also is looking for industry to settle on the 800 acres of tribal land. The Sac and Fox Indian tribes share approximately million in total claims money appropriated by congress. The method of dividing the cash among the tribal members in three states has held up pay- ments of the claims. "It's just sitting there in the U. S. treasury, drawing in- she said. To Move Mrs. Schexnider, who lives in Shawnee, Okla., with her husband, plans to move to Stroud soon. "I believe a leader should live right in the heart of where the work is she said. Her critics were able to have her first election last Sac and Chief Dora Fox Indian Schexnider, the first woman chief in Oklahoma, reached a landmark in her first year in office at a weekend annual tribal pow wow near Stroud, Okla. She is planning construction of a community building and recruitment of in- dustry on the 800 acres of tribal land. summer voided because of alleged voting irregularities. In January she won a sec- ond election. Her term ends in August, 1975. Only Chief "No one else has done what I have done in the short time I've been in she said. "Past leadership had years to do it and they just couldn't cut it." Society Consumer Adviser Fights Administration for CPA By Michael J. Conion WASHINGTON (UPI) Vir- ginia Knauer, President Nix- on's consumer adviser, is lobbying against a large por- tion of the administration and big business in her efforts to get a Consumer Protection Agency (CPA) proposal pas- sed by the senate this week. In a last-minute plea Sun- day, Mrs. Knauer said the agency would be a "powerful antidote to the poison of al- ienation and helplessness af- fecting many of our citizens (who) believe that their pleas for help or understanding are unheeded that only the big and powerful have access to decision makers." Filibuster Expected The agency, consisting of one person with a small staff, would be able to present the consumer viewpoint when any arm of government, such as a regulatory agency, is consi- dering decisions involving health, safety or some other vital consumer issue. Legislation to create the agency has passed the house and is scheduled for senate consideration. A filibuster, which killed a similar pro- posal two years ago, is again expected. Forces on both sides say an attempt to cut off de- bate could pass or fail by one or two votes. Both the U.S. Chamber of Commerce and the National Assn. of Manufacturers lob- bied against the current leg- islation. "In practice the Consumer Protection Agency will repre- sent what it perceives to be the consumer interest very likely the goal of the consum- er the Chamber said in a statement. Business Cost "In the end the results undoubtedly will hike business costs one way or another like seat belts and other devices have done for autos. So all consumers will face increased prices, regardless of whether they have benefited from the CPA." Mrs. Knauer also faces trouble from the administra- tion which employs her. Roy Ash, Nixon's budget director, has been sending letters to congressmen threat- ening a veto unless parts of the bill are changed drastical- ly. "It is the most important consumer matter to come be- fore the congress in the five years I have served as the President's consumer advi- Mrs. Knauer said. "It is the first answer by congress to years of criticism by congress that government agencies too often do not ad- equately reflect consumer interests." Bridge N.Y. Family Moves Daughters' HAUPPAUGE. N. Y. (UPI) A mysterious illness that killed two young sisters has forced their father to pack up his wife and other five children and move out of their family home in Long Island. The dead girls' aunt said she did not think the family would ever return to their sprawling ranch-style home. "They don't want any part of that place she said, "I don't think they're going to conic back, not after what happened." A next door neighbor. ,lames Anzalone, whose house and grounds were treated with chlordane, a termite killer, also moved out with wife and 2-year-old child. "The fumes are still there and it's killing little birds. They just flop out of (he said Mrs. Frances Impastato, the dead girls' aunt. Fo flowing Mysterious Deaths But health officials who worked through the weekend to determine exactly what killed 7-year-old Angelina I-ogue and ner 4-year-old sis- ter. Deborah, said they were unable to link the deaths to the pesticide. Dr. Mary McLaughlin, commissioner of health serv- ices for Suffolk county, said autopsies of the two children haven't shown any finding of chlordane so far. "Right now we're trying to put the pieces together." she said. The Shufflers Winners of the rubber bridge game played Monday at Noelridge Park Christian church were: North-south Mrs. Clyde James and Tail Cummins, first, and Mrs. W. E. Eyman and Mrs. Charles Fitzgerald, second; east-west Mrs. Robert Dreckman and Mrs. Richard Grodt. first, and Mrs. Shirley Moore and Mrs. Bill Howard, second. Over-all winners were Mrs. Dreckman and Mrs. Grodt. The next game is scheduled Monday morning at 9 at the church. JOYCE CHURCHILL FETED AT SHOWER Miss Joyce Churchill, daughter of the Keith Church- ills, 1825 E avenue was feted at a bridal shower Sun- day afternoon. The event, at- tended by 20 guests, was given by Miss Jane Porter. 931 Old Marion road NE. and Mrs. Paul Porter. Miss Churchill and Thomas Pochobrartsky, son of Mrs. Emil Pocho braclsky, -1748 F avenue will be married July 20. LINDA BARNES HONORED AT BRIDAL SHOWER Miss Linda Barnes was ho- nored at a bridal shower Mon- day evening, given by Mrs. George Appleby. 209 Red Fox road SE. Twenty guests shared the courtesy Miss Barnes, (laughter uf Mrs. Mary Jo Barnes. Is Wed in Vernon MT. VERNOX Miss Catherine Anna Humphries, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Dewey R. Humphries of Hartsviilc. S.C., became the bride of Dan Lee Stoner. son of Mr. and Mrs. Virgil Stoner, during a 2 o'clock ceremony Sunday. The Revs. Thomas Stewart and Maurice Cheek officiated at United Methodist church. Fur her wedding, the bride wore a princess sheerganza gown accented with inserts of Venise. lace and styled with a sweetheart neckline, short sleeves and a chapel train. Her elbow-length mantilla was caught to a Juliet cap and she carried a cascade of yellow ro- ses and white daisy pompons. Marcia Humphries was her sister's maid of honor. Other attendants were Mrs. Dan Brown. Mrs. Dennis Hedlund j and Miss Kim Wilkerson. j They wore sleeveless gowns yellow polyester styled with empire bodices and while collars edged in lace. White open lace picture hats com- pleted (heir ensembles and each carried an arm bouquet of white daisy pompons. Mr. Stoner was his sou's best man. ('.niomsmeu were Women's Golf the bridegroom's brothers, street. Marion, is In Hiiy Stoner. Guests were seated bv bride-elect of Kirk Krumm, Bali Hai Estates. Hiawatha. He is the son of the Fred J. Kriinmis. Rainbow bou- levard, Hiawatha. MRS. STANLEY FARMER FETED AT BABY SHOWER Mrs. Stanley Farmer, lifilii Bever avenue SK. was ho- nori'd at a baby shower given Sunday afternoon by Mrx Hoy Sadler. 3014 Fraiibruok drive XU Co-hostess In the 15 guests was Mr.-.. John I.. Sadler Al Clarke, Doug i .iniiii The rnuplr chose Miami for their v.t'ildiiit.' trip. After July will be al home in Ml. Vernon. Holli were graduated frnm ''nc college. The bride affiliated will] ('In Omega surohly and (he bridegroom was a mi'inbrr of Phi Kappa Tan fraternity. He is cm- ployed by Life Investors Insiir- anci' Co. in Cedar ttapuls Elmcresl Junior Thirty-three girls are par- ticipating in a junior girls golf tournament. First-round play Monday saw Kandie Reeves as 9-hole medalist and champion- ship flight leader. Amy Alford is second place winner of championship flight. The 9- hole first flight leader is Brenda Roushar, with Lisa Feddersen in second place; 5- hole championship flight leader is Tami Thomason and Marna White is in second place; 5-hole first flight leader is Susie McAfee and Kristi Bjornsen is in second place; 3- hole championship flight leader is Lana Whitehead with Sue Martin in second place. First flight leader for 3- hole play is Kelli Naso; Gena Young is in second place. Tournament play continues Monday. Jones Junior Medalist with 15 members playing Monday was Barb Feckley. Winners in blind bo- gey were: Susan Zvacek, first low net; Lorene Kuehl, second; Kathy Terrace, third, and Patty Frazier, fourth. Play- next Monday at Jones will begin at a.m. Squaw Creek Junior Flight winners on 18 holes Monday were Anne Pinckney, medalist, and Janet Stuefen, low score. There were 9 play- ers. Other winners were: Susan Lagerstrom, medalist, and Valerie Wroblewski, most 7s. on 9 holes; Tara Gustafson, low and Cheryl Snodgrass, most 10s, on 5 holes, and Joyce Ortega, low score on 3 holes. Twin Pines Junior Paula Higgins was medalist Monday. Flight winners were Joan Peck, 9 holes; Lisa i Griffin, fi, and Michel Thom- as, 4. Prizes for the day went to Amy Schaefer and Christi Thomas. Town House Medalist honors with 29 playing Monday went to Mrs. Marvin Martin. The Mmes. Norris Hunt, Martin, Gary Wilson, Barry Wendt and Jack Spau had birdies and Mrs. Martin sank an approach and had low putts. The Gras- shoppers and the Drags tied for team winners; league winners are the Grasshoppers. BRIDAL SHOWER HONORS MISS MONICA LaGRANGE A bridal shower was given Sunday afternoon honoring Miss LaGrange.July 26 bride-elect of Loran Bend- er. Both are of Amana. Mrs. Don lezak, route two, Cedar Rapids, was hostess, assisted by Mrs. Edward LaGrange. Twenty-one guests attended, are the Joseph LaGtanges of Amana and the Neil Benders of Wellman. CYNTHIA CLOSSEN FETED AT SHOWER A kitchen shower was given Saturday for Miss Cynthia Clossen, Sept. 28 bride-elect of Gary Stephens. Fourteen guests attended at the home of Mrs. Melvin Schulte, 1600 Tenth avenue SW. Co-hostess- es were Miss Maxine Slykhuis and Mrs. John Uthoff. Miss Clossen is the daughter of the Marshall Clossens, 2390 Twenty-fourth street, Marion, and Mr. Stephens is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Vernon Ste- phens of Oxford Junction. Susan Polashek Becomes Bride Miss Susan Jean Polashek and Terry Kevin Brandon were married Friday morn- ing. Parents of the bridal cou- ple are Mrs. Gerald E. Po- lashek, 4201 Twin Pine drive NE, and the late Mr. Polash ek, and Mr. and Mrs. Clar- ence V. Brandon, 416 Sixth street SW. The Rev. William Harnish performed the 9 o'clock ceremony in his office. For her wedding, the bride chose a powder blue gown styled with short puff sleeves, a fitted bodice and a tie sash. She wore a red rosebud cor- sage. Following the ceremony, a reception was given at Bishop cafeteria, downtown. On return from a wedding trip to St. Louis, Mo., the couple will temporarily reside at 1317 Twenty-second avenue SW. The bride is employed by St. Luke's hospital and the bridegroom by Armstrong's department store. ON THIS DATE in 1945. the first atomic bomb was explod- ed over the desert in New- Mexico. It was the beginning of the atomic age. DRIVE SAFELY: Advertisement The Best Carpet Buys Are At Carpetland U.S.A. WE CONTROL CALL 363-1 676 FOR FREE INSPECTION Locally Owned and Operated Since 1948 INSECT CONTROL SPECIALISTS I5ISMT. VI-.KNON ROAD SK ]ear By Abigail DKAH ABBY: My sister-in- law is a very self-centered person. She left her husband I my brother) after 25 years of marriage to marry a gigilo- lype man. This caused my brother to have a nervous breakdown, during which time she never came near to offer sympathy or help. He would have died had it not been for us _ his sisters and brothers. This faithless wife even gave custody of their 15-year- old son to her husband, saying the boy was a nuisance. Now, after several years of ignoring my brother, this terrible woman and her gigilo husband have fallen on hard times, so they came to my brother, who offered to share his home with them. Free room and board he's giving these worthless people They have been there several months now and my brother will not permit any interfer- ence from any of his family. Have you ever heard of a former husband permitting an erring wife and the man who broke up his marriage to be permanent guests in his home? He has no pride, ap- parently. Could his breakdown have addled his brain? My brother holds down a responsi- ble, high caliber job. BEWILDERED DEAR BEWILDERED: If your brother's brain were he conldn't be hold- ing down a high caliber job. Bat addled or not, it's his home and his decision not yours so stay out of it. DEAR ABBY: What do you suggest for a non-sexist sal- utation in a business letter? Obviously, "Dear Sir" is inappropriate; "To Whom It May Concern" is too verbose; "Greetings" connotes induc- tion into armed forces. To further true equality in this male-dominated business world, a new vocabulary is necessary. MS.W. DEAR MS.W.: I offer for your consideration the uni- maginative "Sir or (Too lacking in warmth and Or, (Or does that suggest "Ach- the German com- "To Whom It May Concern" may be verbose, but it is non- sexist and conveys precisely what the writer has in mind, which is still communication at its best. BRIDAL SHOWER GIVEN FOR PAMELA SHAFER A bridal shower was given Sunday afternoon for Miss Pamela -Shatter of Hammond, Ind., by Mrs. Dale Boddicker, 2048 Sharwood drive NE. Twenty guests shared the courtesy. Miss Shafer, daughter of the T.E. Shafers of Newcastle, New South Wales, Australia, former resi- dents of Cedar Rapids, will be married to John Randolph. Park Forest, 111., July 27. The 'uture bridegroom is the son of the C.D. Randolphs of An- amosa. Mrs. Brandon MRS. WILLIAM TAYLOR TO NOTE BIRTHDAY CENTER POINT Mrs. William Taylor will celebrate her 90th birthday Sunday at a Van Alst family reunion. The reunion picnic will take place in Wakema park in Center Point. Qualfyi Prptectiori'- Satisfactior We start with a complete evaluation to determine your need. Then we help select the aid that's right for you. Choose Irom a complete line of Zenith instruments priced from to The price in- eludes all the. consultation and after- purchase adjustments necessary to your complete satisfaction. Batteries for all makes of hearing aids, rue quality goes m heloie the name rjon on. fibout uur Prelection Plan. Manufacturer's suggested retail pncf r cdiral Medical Arts Surgical Supply 2740 First Ave. NE Phonoi 364-4116 STORE HOURS! I a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday thru Friday. Saturday Houm E a.m. to Noon   

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