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   Cedar Rapids Gazette (Newspaper) - July 16, 1974, Cedar Rapids, Iowa                                Porno Guidelines for HEATHCLIFF Impeachment Issues? The Cedar Rapids Gazette: Tues.. July 16. 1874 7 By Dick West WASHINGTON (UH) If you have been following the continuing saga of "Sex and the Supreme you arc aware that the justices have handed down "concrete guidelines" (or regulating por- nography. And you likewise are aware that in taking this stand the justices had their feet firmly planted on quicksilver. The guidelines as to what is or is not obscene left no doubt that the court doesn't know either. "Son of Thraat" This week, having disposed of the pornography question, at least until "Son of Deep Throat" is filmed, the court Dick West took up another momentous is- sue a case bearing on the impeachment issue. In doing so, it started me to musing over what would hap- pen if the court brought to im- peachment the same line of reasoning it has applied to pornography. Take the question of what is or is not an impeachable of- fense. White House lawyers argue one way, house judiciary committee lawyers another. Let's assume this dispute comes before the court for resolution. The key point, in the court's mind, likely will be the offenses attributed to the President had any "redeeming social value." If, for example, Nixon's role in the Watergate case amount- ed to hardcore cover-up, the court might rule that the house had grounds for impeaching him. Serious Value But if his offenses had serious literary, artistic, poli- tical or scientific value, such as protecting national security, then the court might rule im- peachment was unconstitu- tional. Seems clear enough, you say? Hold on for a moment. The court isn't through just yet. Coming up with an additional guideline, it now says that the house, in making this deter- mination, may apply "contem- porary community standards." Have you any idea what the standards in the congressional community are at this point in time? There is hardly anything a President could do that might violate the contemporary com- munity standards of congress. So by that guideline, impeach- ment is out. The real test, however, might come on another guideline: Were Nixon's ac- tions "patently offensive" in that they appealed to political interest? By that criterion, impeach- ment would be inevitable. There is hardly a member of congress who has not been pa- tently offended by something the President did or whose political interests have not been aroused. But the matter doesn't end there. Should the house follow these guidelines, the court may then decide that the Constitution doesn't give congressmen "unbridled discretion in deter- mining what is 'patently offen- sive'." In sum, it may turn out that the articles of impeachment will come in a plain brown wrapper. U.S. Citizens' Gold Ownership Stirs Up Official Nervousness By John Cunnlff NEW YORK (AP) Some- time before the end of the year Americans may share a right that nationals of other coun- tries have long enjoyed, the right to buy gold bullion on the open market. Not since 1933 has this been legally possible for a U.S. cit- izen, although unofficial es- timates place in the billions of .dollars the amount of bullion Tfticoined, unshaped except as bars stashed overseas by Americans. Both the senate and House have passed bills to permit U.S. citizens to own bullion. And the administration, although hesitantly, has pronounced such sales to be right and just. Nervous Signs But now that the moment is at hand, a good many influen- tial Americans, including the secretary of the treasury, have shown signs of nervousness and a tendency to procras- tinate, fearful it seems of what will emerge from a box closed 41 years. One of the more perplexing facets of the problem is this: Why should Americans now be permitted to own a commodity whose ownership in the past was considered unpatriotic and dangerous? Have times changed that much? Yes, times have changed. Gold has been further demonetized, or gradually removed from its role in currencies. The world's trad- ing nations now seek to repose full faith in paper, unbacked by gold. The situation was similar in 1933 too, when the U.S. government sought to bolster paper currency by not only denying convertibility into gold by its citizens but going one step further and makiiig it Big George! Virgil Partch "Of COURSE it's hard. It's specially made for dunking." EVERY PRESCRIPTION IS CAREFULLY FILED IN YOUR Jtl_ FAMILY PRESCRIPTION RECORD Why? To provido a patient profile to insure compatability of your medicines health. 7 CONVENIENT LOCATIONS pharmacies John Cunniff illegal even to possess gold. Foreign central banks could still redeem their dollars for gold, but that right also was suspended on Aug. 15, 1971. There were simply too many dollars abroad and too little gold 10 redeem them. Changed Attitudes But more to the point, many analysts note, is that attitudes have changed since 1933, and many of them compare the gold prohibition to the abortive attempt to deny Americans the right to drink alcohol. Estimates vary widely, but many billions of dollars in gold bullion are believed hoarded abroad by Americans. Charles Stahl, publisher of a com- modity report, estimates the total at between billion and billion. The prohibition, it appears, hasn't been effective. While the world's trading nations at- tempt to substitute paper to replace gold because a limited gold supply would restrict trade, many Americans seem to be losing confidence in paper money, mainly because inflation deflates its value. In purchasing gold abroad, these buyers are adding to the U.S. balance of payments problem, needlessly so in the opinion even of government of- ficials. Why not let them buy gold within the U.S., just as they buy lead or sugar or copper or any other com- modity? "Inherent Freedom" "It isn't so much an economic question any more as much as one of the inherent freedom that Americans should said one economist closely identified with the administration. "This nation is based on the concept of freedom, free en- terprise and private ow- nership. Why should we be denied this freedom when it is available to everyone Nevertheless, many critics believe that a sharp rise in the price of gold could bring further troubles for the dollar, despite the official break with gold as a monetary backup to paper currency. It's a myth, they say, that people will ever ignore the trading value of gold, and treat it as just another commodity. If infla- tion continues, they add, people will seek refuge in gold. Bolstering this belief is the fact that mankind has always sought security in the bright yellow metal, which has been almost defied through the ages. Threat to Paper It is still the one medium of exchange acceptable anywhere, the gold bugs nrte, despite repeated efforts by na- tions to substitute paper. Because of this it constitutes a threat to paper currency, they say. However, forecasts of a big increase in the price of gold because of senate and house approval of gold ownership haven't materialized. Three months ago the price was an ounce at London. At midweek it was One reason for the decline may be the realization that much of the gold held as backing for currencies monetary gold may reach the markets as currencies further break their ties with the metal. But whether that tie ever will be broken remains to be seen. inmates Escape While Guard Out to Lunch PLEASANTON, Calif. (UPI) Two Alameda county jail inmates took advantage of a lunch break they escaped. Sheriff's deputies said DC-' Freeman, 37, awaiting se. tenee for burglary, and Gil'jert Witherspoon, 27, convicted on a stolen property charge, drove out the main gate in a pickup truck while the gate guard was having lunch. Should Seek Detente with Indians By Cusidtue NEW YORK The next time President Nixon sets out to seek a detente with an old foe he should give some thought to getting together with the people we stole this country from: the American Indians. We are an extraordinarily generous nation, perennially ready to heap goods, services, manpower, money and nuclear reactors on the peoples of the world. Provided they art- not American Indians, cf course. Mr. Nixon gave Mr. Brex.h- nev a Chevrolet Monte Carlo this time, to go with the Lin- coln Continental and Cadillac presentations of 1972 and 197.1 All sorts of goodies have been dispensed elsewhere this j.'ar to leaders of Austria, Egypt, Saudi Arabia (I think we gave King Faisal another oil Syria, Israel, Jordan, Portugal and Belgium. But we're about to evict one Indian tribe, the Havasupai, from lands they have worked for years! They now have to come to the Great White Father hat in hand to get a permit to use their acres on the brink of the Grand canyon. The permits may be revoked on the whim or indifference of some desk- bound paleface at the Bureau of Indian Affairs. The Havasupai Indians have long been called "The People of the Grand Canyon." That could be changed to "The People IN the Grand Canyon." They have been largely herded into 518 acres at the bottom of the canyon, all but inaccessible and subject to intensely cold winters. It makes Devil's Island look like Palm Beach. Congress now has a chance to clear its conscience in this particular phase of the long- lime abuse and neglect of the original occupants of the na- tion. It will vole soon on S.1296, a bill to double the size of Grand Canyon National park, and on an amendment sponsored by Rep. Steiger (R- Ariz.) that would grant the Havasupai trust title to their acres up there on the lip of the grand old hole in the earth. If passed, the tribal chiefs would no longer be forced to go whimpering to Washington for permission to Senators Kennedy, Gold- water, Jackson, Humphrey, and Rep. Udall are firmly behind the Havasupais. The opposition is the always well-entrenched conserva- tionists. Addressing himself to them, Sen. Kennedy has said: "The Havasupai have ab- solutely no desire or intention to use their land base for any purpose other than those which they have pursuea-ior years. They are not going to build a dam, or put up a fac- tory, or launch a tourist ex- travaganza, or undertake any other environmentally unsound project. "Rather, they are intent upon preserving and protect- ing the natural, undeveloped, and unspoiled beauty of their homeland, and are perfectly prepared to accept language to provide comprehensive land use planning for the new trust i-ea or any other reasonable congress might impose to assure environmen- tal protection and consistency of use with the adjacent and enlarged Grand Canyon Na- tional park. "Justice for the Havasupai is in no way inconsistent with the OUR SAVINGS STACK UP AS HIGH AS THE LAWALLOWS! Passbook Savings 5% with No Minimum MATURITY 4-year RATE 5WK 6% MINIMUM AMOUNT 300 500 500 1000 FDIC regulations require substantial penalty for early withdrawal prior to maturity. the rota of interest where you FREE CHECKING o> the Home of the Freel GUARANTY BANK TRUST CO. MKMUIR f DIc :lnd HI. :lrrf Avr. mil) flmil Si. SK I IP I .liti-oli enhanced environmental pro- tection for the entire Grand canyon area. The use area upon which the Havasupai depend for survival is the core of their immemorial homeland. It should be con- firmed to them now in trust title, and their fears for the future laid to rest." The Havasupai need that acreage for grazing, housing, agriculture, hurial grounds and religious shrines. Incredi- bly, all but the first are now denied them. Alvin .losephy, senior editor of American Heritage and an outstanding authority on Indian history, does not share the misgivings of fellow conservationists In a plea for the passage of the amendment to S.1296 he has said: "Today, down in the canyon, the Havasupai people face ex- tinction from disease, poverty, and the eventual collapse of their society, their culture and their religion.' the po.'ir Indian hinv badly the relative newcomers to his lands have treated him! It all started with Christopher Columbus on October 12, 1492. when he gave them a wrong name believing he had reached "the Indies." The Spanish, Dutch, Knglish and French took turns exploiting and exterminating them. Then along came the glorious 4th of July, 1776, and we took over where the others left off. We called them savages, which apparently condoned the savage treatment of them. Two years short of 200 years b'er, we still push them around as if we actually owned this land of the free and home of the brave something about the energy I i- crisis: s! RR-4 made only by SAVE 50 OF THE ELECTRICITY YOU USE IN COOKING! ALL THE HEAT GOES INTO THE FOOD IS WASTED! The Amana Radarange Microwave Oven is the most efficient energy-saving way to cook! From the Amana Test Kitchen: 2 Ib. Baked 50% SAVINGS'-! cup of Instant Whole Chicken Coffee TOY. SAVINGS-4 Lobster Tails SAVINGS from the Fry Pan (frozen a oz. each) _4 Hamb (4 SAVINGS -11 Ib. Turkey oz ea) You can make big savings In the electricity you SAVINGS 4 Ib. Beef Roast SAVINGS 4 (8 oz.) Baked Potatoes SAVINGS Layer Yel- low Cake SAVINGS Frozen Broccoli (10 oz. boil in pkg.) "Comparison of microwave oven and electric range made by Sac- ramento utility District. Energy savings will vary with the portions and type of foods. The foods shown are typical foods and portions. Some other foods or portions will fall below 50% savings and others will be considerably more than 75% savinas. Uses less electricity and saves time, tool Cooks most foods in V< the normal time. Automatic Timer Control eliminates useless cooking time and saves energy, too. Only the food gets hot. No massive heat build up like conventional ovens. Operates on 115 volts. No special wiring needed. Open A Prices Budget Account Start at Take Months To Pay MICROWAVE OVEN FIVE-YEAR TOTAL APPLIANCE WARRANTY Amana warrants for five years from date of original purchase, parts and related labor when the prod- uct is used for normal home use within the U.S. and warranty service performed by an authorized Amana servicer. Owner's responsibility is for serviceman's travel charges, local cartage and normal maintenance. Warranty void where product is misused, damaged or altered; serial plate is defaced or service seal Is broken. Warranty applies In Canada except for taxes, duties and assessments levied at time of part export. AMANA REFRIGERATION, INC. AMANA, IOWA J9.WA Where do you want the freezer in your new Amana, refrigerator, on the side? on the bottom? on the top? Ama gives you a choice If you want your zero degree freezer on the side, Ihere's the Amana Side-by-Side. Or you can have it on the top or the bottom. They're all Freo-O'-Frosi in both the refrig- erator and freezer. 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