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Cedar Rapids Gazette Newspaper Archive: July 14, 1974 - Page 8

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Publication: Cedar Rapids Gazette

Location: Cedar Rapids, Iowa

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   Cedar Rapids Gazette (Newspaper) - July 14, 1974, Cedar Rapids, Iowa                                Public mood helps steer impeachment boat Editorial Page 14, 1974 Revitalizing party politics FORTUNATELY for Republicans, their Rule 29 committee did nul consider its jnb finished after reporting tn tile GOP national committee the party's base might be broadened. It will lie recalled that Rule 29 committees were set up in each state as a result of Rule 29 adopted by Republicans in national con- vention at .Miami Beach in 1972. While the purpose of Rule 29 was to get ideas on what could be done at the national level to broaden party membership, it is obvious that any start would have to be made at the local and state levels. It was to that end that the Iowa Rule 29 committee, headed by Lieutenant Governor Xeu, directed its attention once it had completed its national-level work. The committee's recommenda- tions to the Republican state committee are prefaced by the observation that it is readily ap- parent that both major political parties have lost supporters in recent years. The question, then, is how to regain old supporters, the report continued, and how to lure new ones into the fold. After holding public hearings which, disappointingly were not well attended, the committee came up with a number of time- tested suggestions along with a new idea or two that should get the central committee's attention. The most impressive suggestion is one providing for the choosing of party officials in nonelection years. This makes better sense than to continue choosing them in election years. Obviously, a new- comer to an important party post would have more time to learn job responsibilities and to prepare for SPOKESMEN for the Iowa crime commission put a finger recently on one key fact of urban crime that will have to sink in deeper with the public before any effort to cut crime rates can do much good. The point: Policework quality is not what mainly determines whether a given community has a high crime rate or a low one. Many factors over which police have no control have greater influence on how crime levels run. Social, economic, geographical, political and other elements peculiar to the place the character and nature of the people as a whole are what primarily control those rates. In other words, policework quality has a great deal to do with arrest rates and crime solutions, but not much to do with how many crimes get committed in the first place. Success in crime preven- tion may depend in part on vigilance, detection skills and a police force's general reputation for getting its man. But the causes People's forum ivensms To the Editor Via his Political Notes column. Frank Nye has done such a super job of clarify- ing John Culver's recent vote in the house on the H.iys amendment and interrupting his voluminous statements that I thought perhaps he could lend his talents and aid us in figuring out a couple of confusing Culverisms. "David Stanley is a millionaire's son and therefore cannot understand the problems of the poor." Does John mean just Iowa millionaires' sons or does he mean to come down on Stewart Mott. a millionaire millionaire's son who not only financially backed George Mcfiovern so handsomely but recently donated SI.OHO to Ihe Culver coffers. Docs millionaire Averill Harrinian, who gave a (und-rais- ing garden reception in New York that netted for John Culver, also misunderstand the poor and their problems? And what of Teddy Kennedy'.' Joe Ken- nedy was a millionaire, and doesn't that mean he's one of those son-of- elections if chosen in nonelection years. Another suggestion is that party cam-uses be held annually, rather than biennially as at present, at the precinct level with county, district and state conventions also held annually. Democrats already hold annual meetings at lower levels so this idea isn't exactly new. But it, too, makes good sense by promising to keep interest alive at least it should if party leaders are on their toes. A brand new idea is that one wax- to attract more lowans to party caucuses would be to arrange with the Democrats for both parties to hold their precinct caucuses the same night. That is a suggestion with merit: It would locus atten- tion of all lowans on one night as "caucus night." Borrowing another thought from the Democrats, the Rule 29 committee suggested that district conventions should be "separate and apart from state conven- tions." Good idea. It makes no sense whatever to hold district conventions as the Republicans will do again at their state con- vention. Although none of these proposals would make drastic changes in the OOP's present set- up in Iowa, they would, together or separately, be improvements that might help entice more people to become working members, thus broadening the party's base. Assuredly, that is essential in this age when citizens claiming no party affiliation are close to outnumbering those with allegiance to one or the other of the two major parties. crime and the motivations behind what shows up on the record as an ur- ban crime rate, overall, remain outside the province of police to influence substantially one way or the other. Regrettably, therefore, greatly upgrading and expanding a police operation holds no simple answer to knocking down a city's in- cidence of crime. How to do that better still is such a complex matter, rooted in so many imprecise intangibles, that the crime-reduction goal which most good people seek remains beyond the pale of simple answers. It is also regrettably true, as crime commission planning manager Harold Smith pointed out, that rising crime cannot be accurately narrow-ed down to one prime cause: societal permis- siveness. Lenient courts and lenient parents are not the whole and simple story, either. But if useful answers ever come, we'll find them sooner there than in the law enforcement realm: by- looking at ourselves. a-millionaire bad guys'? Or maybe if you are a millionaire residing in New York or Ihe Kennedy compound you have more talents regarding the poor than you do if your roots are in Iowa. John also stated: "It's virtually impos- sible to aspire to higher office, if one is not rich." John aspired and has been in office for 10 years. Is he saying that con- trary to his financial statement he has great wealth, or that he did Ihe impossi- ble? Or maybe he means his riches come from the union dues of Ihe rank and file and tunneled to him by Big Labor moguls like George Meany. I had thought special-interest money was a no-no after all the Watergate moralising about the evils therein Well, maybe Mr Culver means that the money combined in Ihe 54 percent of out-of-lowa donations totaled great wealth. Or maybe he's saying don't do as I do, do as I say. and actions don't speak louder than words Who knows? I'm inclined to llnnk lhat when John Culver recently described himself as "Hot Air Culver and family arriving at the etc no one could add In thai, and he said it himself. Elaine K. Smith Route 1, Monlicello By Clifton Daniel WASHINGTON It President is over tried on the charges against him. he will tried in the court of public upimoii a> wcii as lli flu- niu-u State-. .senate. And that raises the question in Washington of whether the latest nut pouring of information on Ihe Watergate case is convincing the public one or litf Olilfl As sii many tune observed in the last year or so. impeachment of the President is a political process, nut a indicia! one Hecanse i; is a political process, it must take account nf the electorate, as well as the idence peachment. and members of Ihe senate. President if he is impeached, have amply demonstrated their awareness of the weigiit oi public opinion in Iheir deliberations. Help or hurt? As this is an election year for most of them, they liau1 to calculate whether they will profit riost from veiling against the President or voting for him. Some of them see no advantage either way. and try to avoid talking about Watergate at all. Despite the reluctance of some poli- ticians to take the case to the people, the public has rarely been as fully informed about any issue as it has been about Wa- tergate and its ramifications. The scandal has been a part of the public consciousness for more than two years since the breakin at the Democratic national committee in the Watergate office building on June 17. 1972. Interest in the case has been kept alive by a presidential campaign, five criminal trials, a succession of congres- sional investigations, dramatic confron- tations between the White House and the investigators, and a historic appeal to the supreme court. For two months last sunnier daytime television was dominated by the hearings of the senate Watergate committee, and viewers got an education in politics, government, constitutional law and public morality. Overload There is evidence now. however, that the people may be learning more about Watergate than they really care to know. The evidence is mainly in the public- opinion polls and television ratings, and in the mail that newsmen are getting. According to a Gallup poll this month. 53 percent of those interviewed believed that newspapers, radio and television were giving too much attention to Wa- tergate. A Gallup poll last month found that fewer Americans favored the removal of President Nixon 41 percent in June as against 44 percent in May. Their blood lust, never ravenous, seemed to be abating. Network television news programs, which gained listeners in the excitement over Watergate last year, lost perhaps viewers between January and May of this year. This weariness with Watergate has not escaped the attention of the White House, which has every reason to welcome it. Last week its office of communication put out a statement on "the price of Wa- tergate." It said the investigation involved, among other things, "an array of legal talent Hearing 175-200 three grand juries in Washington alone, inquiries by at least seven congressional committees, 53 days of hearings by the senate Watergate committee, tit wit- nesses and t'.ui v.unN :i, weeks of secret sessions by the house itidiciarv committee, whose staff coin- coiivorsations about Watergate Xnliody i Janus Uic> l.clj'cd the I'lisuiciit; the oniv is how much Ihov hurt him. i" over-all cost to Ihe laxpavcrs estimated In the White Hoost" at SI.) million And there is more to come mach more In the words of Ihe White House office of (ommunications. "there has been not one shred ui evidence iuik itie President with the o! the VA a- tergate, the hreakin itself, or the sub- sequent cover-up. Vet, the White House has miscalcuhl- ed the eifeet of other hatches of ev idem e, nol.iblv Nixon's returns ;iml the ev- purgateu1 transcripts nf Hie.ise Since Mav .in i-slinialeil inuii..i, copies nf tuo paperback edition- of Ihe transcripts have been sold, perhaps disclosing a hard (ore of avid Water- gate-watcher- annuls: the mass audience. Hot items In the book trade ihev sav that no MU h paperback has ever sold that well and that fast before. Also, a hardcover hook about Watergate. 'All the President s by Hob Woodward anil Carl Bern- stein of the Washington Post, hit Ihe top o! Ihe best seller list last week. The transcripts have the fascination of on the President of the Culled Slates "All the President's Men reads like a detective story Last week s of information from the house judu iai v miiniiltee ale not so sexv Thev were being admired in Washing- ton for their clanlv and completeness, but thev did no! look like a best seller. It was a fair assumption liial iimst members of the court of public opinion would, as usual, gam their impressions of the Watergate evidence from the and analyses of the news media, and from the White House' pom! nf view, that's not good 'Why, hello, Mr. St. Clair Where's Richard? Oh, he went off down to the basement to do some stonewalling or Uneven application reeks One-way law on lying damned By William Safire WASHINGTON The most tyrannous law nn the statute books today is Section 1001 of Title IS rif the U. S. Code, which makes it a crime for a person tn lie to any federal official. (It is not a crime, of course, for a federal official to lie to any person.) While most civil libertarians have shyly averted their gaxes. this newly- discovered prnsecutnrial treasure has been used in many Watergate cases. At John Ehrlichman's trial, Judge Gerhard Gesell found Section so distasteful he said that if it is the only count upon which Ehrlichman is convicted, the con- viction would be set aside. Under Section 1001. any citizen not under oath, not informed of the danger who as much as looks cross-eyed at any petty federal bureaucrat or investigator can be hauled before a grand jury and indicted for an offense that carries a jail term of five years and a fine of Since the best way to repeal a had law is In insist on its equal application to all those who break it. let us consider a recent probable violation of Section 1001 by an eminent guardian of the public trust. On March 111 of this year, a startling story was filed out of Cleveland by United Press International reporter Pete Spudich: "No evidence was produced in the senate Watergate hearings to support impeachment of President Nixon, Wa- tergate committee chairman Sen. Sam Ervin (D-N.C.) said Sunday." The story was based on remarks made to several reporters after a speech at Case Western university, in which Ervin agreed with Nixon that an impeachable offense had to he a federal crime. No evidence to support impeachment, according to Ervin? Even in paraphrase, that was an important judgment, and the senator's surprising exoneration of the President was confirmed by another reporter present, Bud Weidenthal of the Cleveland Press, who wrote that Ervin "also said that he learned nothing during the long senate investigation that in- dicated to him that Nixon had committed an impeachable offense." When panic-stricken aides of Ervin pointed out to him the cold-print ac- counts of what he had said in Cleveland, the senator realized the magnitude of his gaffe. Although the heavens would not have fallen if he had admitted a mistake, or that he had second thoughts about his statement, he did what most politicians do to cover up a blunder: He claimed he never said it. On the senate floor, he told 99 federal officials: "I hereby categorically state that I did not make any such statement But at least two experienced reporters, writing independent accounts of what he said, reported just the op- posite. Somebody was not telling the truth. If the person not telling the truth were the only one of the three who had any motives for lying, then the august chair- man of the senate Watergate committee is in violation of Section and should be prosecuted. We had best rid ourselves of Section 1001 before we are forced into the irony of prosecuting those who lie to cover up their blunders as they pursue those who lied to cover up their blunders. After all. no men not even chairmen should be "above the law." New York Times Service William Safire inches turn to taken miles 'Sexism' defendant swears his innocence By William F. Buckley, jr. TWICE IN as many days I have been reproached as a sexist, having in- tended no offense, and I fear that Ihe hue I had thought best left undefined, needs now a little chiseling, lest things get out of hand. I mean, more' out of hand. I am reviewing a book for the New York Tunes, It is a very fine book abniit the Antarctic, and includes engrossing chapters about the great expeditions of a half century ago. I conclude the review by observing (can any observation 1 have observed in Ihe last ten years have been more that the book would ap- peal nut only In scientists and students of the Arctic but to "boys who love adven- ture stories." Two pieces of mail already, the llfsl especially indignant. "Just what makes you think that only boys love adventure stones1' I read advent ore stories throughout my childhood, and U is typical of male chauvinists to assume lhat only bovs like to read adventure stories." A tlav later, in the company of two distinguished journalists. I sought in examine the question going the rounds, namely where are American leaders' Thai last us the question explored in Ihe current issue of Time at great and rather resourceful length. A lady panelist raised her hand to ask had we noticed lhat of the 310 young potential leaders in America, listed by Time magazine, only were "Approximately !li2 percent." she said, exactly. We were all temporarily nonplussed, and it was then that I found mvself saving thai, really, the figure was not all lhat surprising, because it remains a fact thai more men than women are attracted In those con- spicuous professions from which leaders are taken. 1 fell a chill in Ihe audience, as if I had said the kind of thing Professor Shocklev in saying. Accordingly. 1 issue herewith a modest manifesto. William F. Buckley, jr. rate, issue in a death sentence for the synecdoche. That there are grown people in Ihe world who go around saying things like "chairperson" is testimony not to bisexual attempts to create equality, but to transsexual resolutions to sound stupid. The phrase: "will appeal to adven- ture-loving boys" is not an exclusionary phrase, because the word "boys" in this case means not only hoys, but also girls. Yon cannot maintain the equilibrium of English language by saving lhat "man's inhumanity to man" is measured in part by the sexism of lhal phrase. Is it seriously thought that man's inhumanity to man is to be distinguished from man's humanity toward women'.' Or lhal "he who laughs last laughs best" means lhat girls laugh best when they laugh first, whereas boys laugh best when they laugh last'.' And as for Ihe business of future leaders. Ten years ago. al Ihe slarl of the women's lib movemonl, approximately 10 pcrccnl of the stiidenls in law schools were girls, and now that figure has risen by approximately II percent This sla- li-lic has been cited ill such lones of despair as would he appropriate in say- thai over ,'i Ill-year period, death Irnm slarvalion had diminished by only a lew percentage points in America. a ,s tne uniformity of the standards ,hat is WInnK point hu, [nr tht, makinR it. thal mah, ls IUTessanly en- in more productive or more humane work, than the female nonlawyer. This morning's newspaper brings the news thai our secretary of health, education and welfare, Mr. Caspar Weinberger, has solemnly announced that it is not a regulation of his office lhat hoys and girls attend jointly school lec- tures on sexual hygiene. At the I niver- stty of it has been announced thai unless exactly as much money is spent on girls' sports as on boys' sports, the entire federal subsidy will be withdrawn. What kind of prehensile lengths are we going to? Miss Ciormainc lireer recently debated wilh me on Ihe general and asked me to propose a [ormal resolution 1 typed nut, "liosolvod. (live Ihem an inch and they'll lake a mile" hill, prudently, thought heller of it, as one does not play mischievously wilh metaphors wilh Ciermaine (Ireer Hut, yon know, it's true.   

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