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Cedar Rapids Gazette Newspaper Archive: July 12, 1974 - Page 7

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Publication: Cedar Rapids Gazette

Location: Cedar Rapids, Iowa

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   Cedar Rapids Gazette (Newspaper) - July 12, 1974, Cedar Rapids, Iowa                                The Cedar Kapids Gaulle: Frl .July 12. 1974 7 Exchange 4-H Visitors Exchange 4-H visitors to Eastern Iowa have arrived at haymaking time. As in many other counties, 4-H members of Linn county are hosting visitors from other states. Steve Bateman, right, of Greeley', Colo., helps Doug Becker load hay on the Ted Becker farm near Center Point. Watching are two of the chaperones accompanying the 30 Colorado 4-H members, Mr. and Mrs. Art Briggs of Greeley. ISU Research Grant Renewed by Science Foundation AMES A renewal grant of has been awarded to the Iowa State university center for agricultural and rural development to continue the research and research modeling efforts on the na- tion's agriculture, land and water use, export capabilities, and energy and environmental impacts. The grant was renewed by the RANN program (Research Applied to National Needs) of the National Science Founda- tion. The funds will be used to continue the development and application of large-scale com- puterized linear programming models of the nation's future agricultural, food, resource use and environmental problems. The research was begun in 1972 with an initial NSF grant of Evaluate Policies The research models under development not only measure and evaluate outcomes of al- ternative future policies at the national level for agriculture and land use, but also include in-depth analyses by com- modities, rural areas, water supply regions, and several thousand individual land resource groups of the states. Earl 0. Heady, the center's director and principal research investigator for the project, said the research and models have the capacity not only to evaluate the impact of alterna- tive export trade policies on the nation's agriculture but also to indicate how land use, rural employment and farm income in an individual region of the nation or state might be af- fected by changes in tech- nology, public subsidy of water development, or environmen- tal legislation in other par- ticular regions or states. Detailed Work The models are the largest and most detailed that have been developed for agriculture and its resources. Initial work on this modeling effort was begun a dozen years ago at ISU and the models have been used by nearlyevery presidential or national commission which has dealt with agricultural problems and policies. In addition to Heady, others with major responsibility in the research are: Kenneth ,1. Nicol, James C. Wade, Anton Meister. and Dan Dvoskin. The study is being implemented in ISO's college of agriculture. Plan Aims for Better Feeder Calf Prices AMES (AP) Two programs designed to make beef cattle production more profitable for Iowa farmers have been announced by the Iowa Beef Improvement Assn. Both programs are designed to help Iowa cattlemen com- mand better prices when selling feeder animals to feedlot operators. One program involves keep- ing records snd obtaining beef carcass information on feedlot steers. The other is a group- sale program of quality treated cattle for Iowa feedlols. Yield Records David Noller of Sigourney. president of the beef improvement group, said the new feedlot testing program will be called PROFIT, which stands for Performance Repu- tation on Facts in Test. That program is designed to test young cattle sired by per- formance tested bulls. Noller said cattle will be fed for a fee in a commercial feedlot, where feed records will be kept. After test cattle go to slaughter, in- formation will be compiled concerning the kind of beef Hie animals yield. The other plan, said Dr. John derrick, Iowa State univer- sity extension veterinarian, is to group together 500 or more feeder cuttle to be sold at a local auction bar in one sale. These feeder cattle would be "certified" as ready for placement in feedlots. Need Certification Certification involves wean- ing, castration, vaccinations, dehorning, grub control, etc. Ilerrick said such a program is needed in Iowa because 80 percent of the Iowa calves sold generally are not weaned prior to sale, 75 percent have not been immunized and 25 per- cent not castrated. He said failure to have cattle treated contributes to about a 2 percent death loss the first month a feeder has them. Few Farmers in '74 Farm Program Less than a third of Linn county farmers had enrolled in this year's farm program by Thursday, only four da.vs- before Monday's signup deadline, according to Don- ni'lla Brady, Linn county Agricultural and Conservation Service executive director. Although farmers will not receive any federal funds for retiring acreage this year, I he program docs provide for disaster insurance, Karinrrs must also be enrolled in the program in order lo receive, support loans mid piiymonls. Marketing Weight Of Steers Drops WASHINGTON of the overweight slaughter cattle which earlier helped depress markets appear to have been moved through the consumer pipeline, according to an agriculture department report. Last week, the department said, the average weight of steers sold on six major Mid- west markets was pounds each. Although down from pounds a week earlier, the average still was above the year-earlier level of pounds, the Agricultural Marketing Service said. Prices for choice steers also continued to improve last week, averaging per 100 pounds on the six markets, compared with the week before. A year earlier, how- ever, the average was Disagreement Surrounds Meat Grading Question WASHINGTON (DPI) Revising federal beef grades won't be easy because cattlemen, packers, retailers and consumers can't agree on what lo do, an agriculture department specialist says. Pressure for changes in beef grading standards has been increasing in recent months. Much of the push has been coming from cattlemen who say new standards could result in developing a wider market for beef which is lender and palatable but needs less grain feeding than the currently popular choice grade. Voluntary Use "But the meat industry is in great disagrcomcnl on what, if anything, .should he done nboul says John C. Pierce, dead of the livestock division of he agriculture department's Agricultural Marketing Ser- vice. The AIMS sels beef grading landards and operates the ederal grading service which s used on a voluntary basis by nosl meat packers. Under that service, beef which has first been inspected and passed for wholesale is then checked by a grader who assigns it a quality rating prime, choice, good, .standard or utility. Yield Grade In addition, many processors also ask for use of a companion yield grade which indicates how much salable meal can lie cut from Hie beef carcass. In one case, for example, a steer carcass might be graded choice with a yield grade of 2; another might also be graded choice with a yield grade of 5. Meal from both carcasses would lie of quality, bill Ilic yield grade 'J animal would produce considerably more salable beef anil less fatly wasle to be trimmed off. ATHLETE'S FOOT GERM HOW TO KILL IT. IN ONE HOUR, siroriR, (inli'lulrylng T-l-l. riwks lirh anil liumliiK m ynur .We Imck ill nny ilniR nnnllpr. Tlrni, In M days walrh hiivrli'd skin slough oil. Wnich' IIEAI.TIIV skin npiwirl NOW ill nil slnrm. Organic Farming Tours Tuesday DUNKERTON Two tours of organic farming plots will be conducted Tuesday at Dunker- ton and Denver. The morning tour starts at a.m. on the Richard and Al Steffen farm 3 miles south- west of Dunkerton. The after- noon tour starts at p.m. on the Richard and James Happel farm 2 miles east of Denver. Pennsylvania Exchange ELKADER Clayton county 4-H families will be hosting a group of 4-H members from Washington county, Pa., dur- ing the week of July 15 through 21. The group includes 28 girls, II boys, and 4 adult chaperones. DRIVE SAFELY! Town Despite Gains, Hog-Corn Ratio Stiil at a Low WASHINGTON (AP) De- pite a sharp upturn in hog prices last week, a government indicator shows things will have to improve a lot further before real profits return to the industry. The agriculture department said this week that hog prices at Omaha, Nth., averaged per 101) pounds last week, the most in months. During the week of .June 10-14, for example, the Omaha price averaged only per hundredweight. But the USDA hog-corn ratio, which illustrates how hog prices line up according to feed costs, was 13.0 last week. Although improved from previous readings, the indica- tor was still far below the level economists say is needed to encourage greater hug output. Last week's ratio meant Kill pounds of liveweight hog bought 13 bushels of corn on the Omaha market. Economists believe a 20-bushel tradeoff is needed on a sus- tained basis to convince farmers to boost production significantly. A month ago, however, the picture was far worse. At that time, with hogs at the ratio dropped to 8.5 bushels. Corn at that time sold for an average of per bushel. Last week corn was per bushel, the department said, but the increase in hog prices exceeded that gain. Romania To Buy U.S. Farm Goods WASHINGTON (AP) The agriculture department says Romania will buy million worth of U.S. farm commodi- ties, mostly feed grains, under a new commercial credit arrangement. The arrangement includes a three-year line of credit by the department's Commodity Credit Corp. for the purchase of barley, oats and grain sorghum valued at million; corn million; and cotton million, USDA said this week. Freese Wins Gilt A Benton Community FFA member won a purebred Hampshire gilt for judging talents shown at the Iowa Junior Hampshire field day. Dan Freese (center) of Van Home was the high individual in judging competition at the Lloyd Martin farm near Marion. Flanking Dan are FFA teammates Ron (left) and Don Tiedemann of Blairstown, who scored the highest in group judaina. Two Re-Elected To Soil Group MOINKS Two members of the stale soil con- servation committee were re- elected to their respective posts at the committee's July meeting in Des Moiries. Donald Johnson of Fairfield was re- elected chairman, and J. Thomas Kenny was named vice-chairman. Soil Commissioners Will Meet July 24 AMANA A regional soil commissioners meeting will be held at the Seven Village res- taurant at the Amana exit of interstate 80 starling at p.m. July 24. A speech contest willibe held, and a regional director will be elected. Candidates for the regional post are Larry Shalla of Riverside, who is seeking re-election, Virgil Cory of Morning Sun and Fred White of Parnell. Committee Appointment An Eastern Iowa couple, Mr. and Mrs. Ted Mahood of La Porte City, have been named to the Iowa Farm Bureau Federation's young member advisory committee for a two year term. Need a second car? Read Classified. I GIANT An. SWl SMULEKOFFS acres of for Open Saturday 9 a.m. 'til 5 p.m. DEHUMIDIFBER DH14-2K ENDS Moisture Problems in Your Home STOP Moisture Damage The AMANA Way Removes up to 70% More Moisuture from the Air! Guaranteed to Outperform All Others! PORTABLE Easy to move from room to room 3-WAY MOISTURE REMOVAL Place directly over drain, through hose to drain, or use big condensate pan furnished with unit. BIGGER CAPACITY To Dehumidify Bigger Area Amana wrings more moisture from air because warm moist air flows over 2 rows of copper coils. Dehumidfies up to co. ft. area with Amana's 1-6 h.p. bigger compressor BEAN EARLY BIRD BUY NOW BEFORE THE RUSH Amana FIRST! SMULEKOFF'S TERMS TO FIT YOUR BUDGET STORE HOURS: Daily 9 a.m. to 10p.m. Sunday 9 a.m. To 7 p.m. PANDA PAINT SPECIALS 4 BIG DAYS FRI.-SAT. SUN.-MOM. Reg. PANDA VINYL ACRYLIC LATEX HOUSE PAINT Dries In 30 Minutes Soap and Water Cleanup A Bear For Wear [99 Gallon Reg. PANDA FASHION FLOW LATEX WALL PAINT Easy To Apply Dries In Minutes Soap and Water Clean up Gallon Reg. PANDA LATEX SEMI-GLOSS ENAMEL For Woodwork, Bathrooms, Furniture, Kitchens Brush or Roll It. [99 Gallon Reg. DRI-WALL BASEMENT WATER PROOFER Ready Mixed- Ready To Use. 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