Cedar Rapids Gazette, July 11, 1974, Page 38

Cedar Rapids Gazette

July 11, 1974

View full page Start A Free Trial!

Issue date: Thursday, July 11, 1974

Pages available: 38

Previous edition: Wednesday, July 10, 1974

Next edition: Friday, July 12, 1974

NewspaperARCHIVE.com - Used by the World's Finest Libraries and Institutions
About Cedar Rapids GazetteAbout NewspaperArchive.com

Publication name: Cedar Rapids Gazette

Location: Cedar Rapids, Iowa

Pages available: 3,375,548

Years available: 1932 - 2016

Learn more about this publication
  • 2.10+ billion articles and growing everyday!
  • More than 400 years of papers. From 1607 to today!
  • Articles covering 50 U.S.States + 22 other countries
  • Powerful, time saving search features!
Start your membership to the world's largest newspaper archive now!
Start your genealogy search now!
See with your own eyes the newspapers your great-great grandparents held.

View sample pages : Cedar Rapids Gazette, July 11, 1974

All text in the Cedar Rapids Gazette July 11, 1974, Page 38.

Cedar Rapids Gazette (Newspaper) - July 11, 1974, Cedar Rapids, Iowa AP Wirephoto Toothy Tweak Aiidry Johnson asked her four-month-old leopard cub. Bwana, for cub are part of a rodeo and wild west show appearing at Atlantic City a kiss. Instead, she got a toothy tweak. She wasn’t hurt. She and the Sales HH • Trip Treasury Secretary William K. Simon briefs newsmen in Washington on his forthcoming trip to the Middle East. Simon, ona' a Wall Street bond broker. will try to sell government securities in the areas he visits. His trip began Thursday. — AP Wirephoto American entertainer Frank Sinatra, with companion Barbara Marx, far right, boarded his private jet at Sydney airport Tuesday, bound for Melbourne, Australia, where he was scheduled for a five-concert $135,lMKi-a-night tour. A wave of union indignation at Sinatra and his bodyguards, who manhandled two men and a woman reporter whom he called a $150 hooker, brought cancellation of his comeback tour and temporarily stranded him in Australia. —AP Wirephoto . . . Off Again American singer Frank Sinatra enters a waiting car after leaving his private jet at Melbourne. Sinatra could not leave Australia while union workers refused to service any plane he might board. The ban was lifted Thursday after Sinatra and Australia’s top union leader conferred Unions had demanded he apologize for his recent comments about the Australian press. On Again . . . —UPI telephoto AP Wirephoto Pony Express 1974 Three Colorado communities sponsored a protest against new U. S. postal service procedures for sorting and delivering mail Thirteen cowhands were enlisted to carry saddlebags full of post cards from Telluride and Lake City to Montrose and they made the run in eight hours. Residents say it takes two or thm* days for the mail to arrive by conventional methods. Practice Session IS. Astronaut Thomas F. Stafford, foreground, and Soviet Cosmonaut Alexei Leonov sit in a model of a Soviet Soyuz space ship during training at the space center near Moscow. U S. and Soviet teams are preparing for a joint space flight next year UPI Telephoto Vo Iu rn i ti o u s Tes t i rn o ny Ben West, left, superintendent of the house press gallery, passes out copies of testimony and evidence gathered by the house judiciary committee in the Watergate phase of its impeachment inquiry. Fight volumes of evidence were released by the committee Wednesday night. The Lost Thing a Man ll ill Do Is Ask Someone lf here Something Is By Erma Hornbeck Speaking of stereotypes, where does it say that a woman was born to read road maps? For generations, it has been assumed that the moment a man climbs behind the wheel of a car, the glove compartment door opens automatically, dispensing a road map into the waiting hands of the “little woman.” It happened tc me right after the wedding when we climbed into the car to embark on our honeymoon. The glove compartment door snapped open depositing a grease-stained road map into my lap (I knew it was old when I noted that the six southern state's were labeled The Confederacy.) “I don’t read road maps,” I said. WhatffH Meanf My new husband looked at me like I had just announced I slept in a tree hanging from six toes. “Whatya mean, you don’t read road maps?” “I get sick and throw up if I read when a ear is in motion.” “So, why didn t you tell me this before we were married?’ “What was all that jazz about sickness and health?” I snappy “Big deal! You better worry about how we’re going to get to (loose Fork, Mich.” “Couldn’t we stop and ask?” Now, that’s the first revelation. A woman soon finds out that is the last thing a man does I have seen my husband bite his necktie in half in a rage. I have seen him reading the moss on the tree in the middle of the Everglades. I have seen him going the wrong way on a one-way express shouting, “Same to you, fella,’’ but he never stops and asks Strand fierelatiam The second revelation is that no matter how expert you become in reading road maps, he refuses to believe one word of what you are saying He once argued that the Colorado river wasn’t. It was just a low spot that had been irrigated. That the New Jersey turnpike was built in a circle and that I purposely routed him through New York City at 5 p iii to punish him for not making a kidney stop all day long In an effort to Help Stamp Out Sexism, I recently suggest-ed to my husband that we trade roles So I drove the car and he read the road map You know something? It blew another myth Grown men do too cry . . . out loud, with their head in the no-draft . . . while chewing a road map into little pieces. Copyright IV/4. Field Enterprltet, Inc I UPI Telephoto * ;

RealCheck