Thursday, July 11, 1974

Cedar Rapids Gazette

Location: Cedar Rapids, Iowa

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Cedar Rapids Gazette (Newspaper) - July 11, 1974, Cedar Rapids, Iowa Weather— Chance of rain through Friday. Lows tonight 70 to 75. Highs Friday 90 to 95. tftlrtr ti pub CITY FINAL 15 CENTS CEDAR RAPIDS, IOWA. THURSDAY, JULY ll, 1974 ASSOCIATED PRESS, UPI, NEW YORK TIMES Policemen A ★    ★    ★    ★    A Panel: '68 Funds Used Prosecutor To Answer Charges Public Safety Commissioner James Steinbeck appeared in Linn district court Thursday afternoon before Judge William Eads and was given until July 24 at IO a.m. to plead on charges of conspiracy, perjury and obstructing justice. Any motions in the case must be filed before July 22 at 5 p.m., the judge said. By Roland Krekeler Public Safety Commissioner James Steinbeck and five detectives who were suspended following their indictments Tuesday were scheduled to be arraigned in Linn district court Thursday afternoon. The others indicted are Wallace F. Johnson, 50; Darwin A. Ammeter, 38; Robert B. Manchester, 32; Donald T. Rosdail, 31, and Kenneth E. Millsap, 42. All are charged with perjury and obstruction of justice in connection with alleged lies to the grand jury or the county attorney purportedly designed to destroy the reputations of other officers and to gain the election of Steinbeck last fall. A11 except Johnson are charged also with conspiracy. He is named as an unindicted co-conspirator in the conspiracy indictments. Johnson was appointed to the department Nov. 9. 1951, became a detective Feb. I. 1957.1 and was promoted to lieutenant Aug. I, 1960. to captain Jan. I, j 1969. and became assistant chief April 4. 1973. Steinbeck. 31, was appointed to the police department March. I. 1965, and resigned from the T o Buy Nixon Gifts WASHINGTON (AP) — The I that money was channeled to senate Watergate committee in buy the diamond earrings for its final report says contribu-; the 60th birthday of Patricia tions to President Nixon’s 1968 Nixon on March 22, 1972, the campaign were used to buy his!report said. Asks Care By Court wife expensive diamond ear- Federal campaign law does, WASHINGTON (AP) — Assis rings and may have financed no t prohibit using campaign tant special Watergate prosecu-; thousands of dollars.of luxury f un ds for personal expenses, but tor Richard Ben Veniste said items for his Florida home. the Internal Revenue Service (Thursday another gap had been The committee said its inves- says any funds so used would discovered in White House re-tigators also built a strong cir- have to be declared as taxable cordings of presidential conver-cumstantial case    suggesting,    income    for    the    individual    in-sations. but not proving,    that C. G.    volved. “Bcbe” Rebozo, the Presidents! President Nixon’s income | closest friend, may have divert-    taxes for the years    1969 through led for his own purposes at least    1972 do not    list any such gifts. I part of a $100,000 contribution    „    ,    , j from billionaire Howard    Remaining    Money I Hughes. The report also alleged that:    executive    session    that money    tapes relating to the Watergate Early in his administration,    remaining    in the I 4    lorida Nixon    case. President Nixon asked Rebozo ^ or President account after the    19    Minutes to solicit major    contributions     1968 election    was    owed    him as    loamed    that    one of from oil magnate J Paul Getty payment for his expenses in the \    .    .    .    .     1fl ii vin oui ii ugli alc j i-dui ueuy, J* '     r    the tapes contains almost a 19- to pay for White House social campaign.    minute    nan    ”    Bon    Vrniste    said events.    Investigators    said    they could minute gap ’ Ben Veniste said ’ White House aide John Khr-     not    substantiate    that    point    be- He also said the special prose- I bellman pressured the Internal    (Continued:    Page 3,    Col.    3.) j Revenue Service    in hopes of-- getting former Democratic .Chairman Lawrence O’Brien jailed before the 1972 election. In a hearing before Judge John Sirica, Ben Veniste mentioned the gap in asking the court for an order directing the White House to begin indexing and to take precautions to pre-Rebozo told the committee in serve various White House Painter —UPI Telephoto A White House spokesman called the report “warmed over baloney” based on “unsubstantiated allegations.” James St. Clair, Nixon’s Watergate lawyer, refused to re Dean Ss Quoted: President Knew Before March 21 cutor’s office has learned of another tape being torn and mangled by White House secretaries during transcription. Ben Veniste made no further mention of the damaged tape's and would not elaborate after court. However, he said the tape with the 19-minute gap was not one of those being subpoenaed by the prosecutor’s office for use in the Watergate case. Two-year-old Brian Sintay of Springfield, III., woke from his nap Wednesday and reached the opened paint can left unattended by his father before his parents knew he was awake. After dipping both hands in the paint, he headed down the driveway grinning. At least it was water-base paint, commented his mother. __-...............................-—•    I knows, was this ever done.*’ President Holds Prosecutor Sums .M.- n    •    „    Up Ehrlichman’s refusal to cooperate in fur- snflation Session Ro p , e in 'Breakin’ ~ ^Txo^calll^ 11 I P di!-I WASHINGT °N < Ap t - As '|tractors who^fght have^orked WASHINGTON (UPI) - John Dean reportedly testified Thurs-spond to most of the evidence ( * ay Diat he certain Pres- o:-i ca did not j ssue j be or( i er Offered by the committee, but J*"*.    B® 1    Veniste    asked,    but he did said he wanted to “convey the     21    -     19 J 3 »    that    secret    pay-    ,    .     ecord    0 f    Thursday’s President's assurance that he :™7^     0ngl *hearing    over a tape dispute for ever instructed C. G. Rebozo to ndl ^ dff r g dt e defendants. warded to the supreme court raise and maintain funds to be Ro P Danielson ,DCalif.).' wardc(1 ,0 the iu P rcme expended on the President’s summar, ^ ing Deans prelimi- Saxbe Theory Clears Kissinger in Wiretaps .. , WASHINGTON (AP) fnrrp 1 act war to run for safety* WASHINGT0N (UPI) ~ J i Senators Percy (R-Ill.) and ; dent Nixon called a dis- soci ate special Watergate prose-;either for Rebozo or the Pres-torce last year to run tor saien Edgar Hoover the late FBI Case ( r.n.J.) agreed with tinguished group of economists cuto r William Merrill conceded ident. four°vrs^Tse^vlee    as°a°detcc-    director, may have used Henry I Saxbe.    and business    men    - but    no    Thursday    that    John    Ehrlichman    Swimming    Pool tive.    Kissinger’s name without his “The way he (Hoover)    operat-    labor leaders    —    to    the White    did    not    approve    a    breakin    at Ammeter    was    appointed    to    knowledge in order to initiate cd leads    me    to wiretaps on persons the White,other than    the    President,    no one    tion on inflation. which is studying the question marx/    vvhether    the    President has to personal behalf, nor so tar ^ he C in "    ^    J    ,     1    a ' release tapes and other Water- session of the house judiciary 1    ,    .. r J J I gate evidence. The record was sent to the supreme court at the request of i assistant special prosecutor I James Neal, who rejected a White House offer for verifying portions of 20 of the 64 tapes the I prosecutor’s office has subpoenaed. Only Portions Neal complained that the Evidence Release WASHINGTON (AP) - The house judiciary committee is to make public tonight eight volumes of materials it has gathered in the course of its presidential impeachment investigation. committee’s impeachment in- the department March 15, 1961, .     iHoo „     T hur*ri a v    for    a    rnnversa    'he office Of Daniel Etlsberg's The effort prudured informa- quire,    said Deans recall on that'White House offer would allow believe that, House thursday for a conversa- nci(nliioli , lef w coia ihn fn ^ or tion that in the 1968-1972 period,point psychiatrist, but said the former D .     1    . presidential assistant was guilty Rcbozo s >* nt morc ,han S 50 - 000 1 canoe “has potential signify; Sirica access only to portions of J the tapes identical to transcripts and was promoted lo detective House ‘ regarded as enemies, I could ever tell Hoover what to The meeting was expected to Sf Vto«ing *a^iTiegai7 nortracea'-l 77 m “ ch °j “j" f‘°° t b ! lls u _ for Danielson said it implies: already released by President June 1,1969.      ltl ______^_____,    I . ..,    ...     e .„ ot u: n<I    k« 'be the first in a series of discus- hip sprrpt search    Presidents    benefit, buying Nixon acquiesced in the pay-Nixon. Sirica could not hear all I do lf he felt something might bel.,...  .....   M! ...... a hie secret search.    isuch    items    as    a    204»y-4Moot    menu    to    the    defendants    -    con-jot the tapes, and the tapes s i 0 n s between Nixon and Manchester was appointed to says Attorne y General Saxbe     OIVJIO       — the department April 17, 1967 , The theory was supported by in the national interest,” Percy var j 0lLS p roups 0 f Americans on Iakm 8 IIld argument to swimming pool, a fireplace, sidered potential grounds for a themselves could not be used as the nation's economic problems, i tbe Jary ' Mernl1 “?•    “    major architectural -------      clear    that    no    one    used    the    word     and a $1 200 pool tab , e and was promoted to detective two Republican senators follow- said. July 2. 1971.    ing the attorney    general’s testi-j    Case said, “The fact that a    especially    the    rampaging cost    of Rosdail was    appointed to the mon y be f ore the    senate foreign    statement on an FBI record    living. ,. e f a ^ Hpt#»rtivp ink’ relations committee Wednesday, isaid that so-and-so requested ai Kenneth Rush, the President’s was promoted to detects July ., u ^ fee    reason    ^    economic: spokesman indited I* JLT* J.*    .    .    „    .    «    ...    *    ti    '    *    *    I    noflinr* true* u'Aav thof truno On Appeal    ; lble    for Mr Kissinger not to Millsap was appointed to the*" 0 "' h<> ., Was a ^ m f„, U H Sed    aled. department April 8, 1958, was    ( wodK j C ur    eioseTmeet- 1 At Kissinger's request, the' The opening mceling, howev- ?^ m0 mri to lieutenant Dec    “ Hoover    cou!d    have    ^     commit,ec has be 8 un hearings 0 ", included 19 chief executives 1971. He was demoted detective :ac ';"K on b 7. wn i i , ni,iativ0 ''    » b °thcr he testified accura-     Ro ™ July 24, 1973,    in a disciplinary j R SKit     tely dUrin|! confirmation hear ‘    minum    Company    of    America proceeding that is on appeal to\     f y ch    hc    ordcred    the    ings    on his appointment as sec.(Alcoa). General Motors U.S. the Iowa supreme court.    „„„ n mmoni nf. retarv of state last fall.    Steel. Sears Roebuck and Co changes charge of obstruction of justice, {courtroom evidence, according “Dean said he couldn’t give alto the offer. It also led to the discovery specific date, but he’s got a per- “The offer is illusory.” Neal that Rebozo was using four sep- vasive strong feeling that he said. “It means nothing.” John Chester, a White House breakin because a breakin was not contemplated . I mat ucuu/jD y>as    iuui    otp-i    * v “Inconsistent”    i ara t e trust accounts, not in his talked to the President about . . earlier this week that trade “To talk about a breakin name but in that of his attor- tho payments before March 21, prove where that request origin- union , eaders may be invited t0 wou ld not only be inconsistent ; ney, Thomas Wakefield, the re- Danielson told a reporter. subsequent sessions.    with    covert/but    inconsistenti P« rt said    “If    you    consider    that    in    a    few Continued: Page 3, Col. 5.) Tho five nolicc officers were. wlretap P ing of R°vernment of- rotary of state last fall.    rZnZl"    ^7^’    I    operation    on    condition it not be P°    Imd    t n    Anij| e sa j d | ben be d i(j no t re- Proctor and (iambic, and East ^ raced bac ^ to the White House. with covert, but inconsistent P° rt sal( *-with nontraceable,” Merrill! It was through these accounts said. Direct testimony and memos entered in evidence at the ll-! day-old plumbers trial have said Ehrlichman approved a covert attorney, objected to the record being sent to the supreme court. He said the issue had adequately (Continued: Page 3, Col. 8.) u I im    onri    Rcials    and    newsmen    to deter-, ...------------- ------- 0    i!™*     ,he    source    0f    sccurity    " i ; etaps by ,b L d hi 17Tdo^n economists were also Ehrlichman conceded giving |leaks '     H ° USC    plUmberS an<i d ‘ d " 0t on the gucst Hst includmg uvo a PP rova l m the summer of I97lc ( , nat0r Gurney Jury Indicts Senator Gurney for Bribery, Conspiracy, Cover-Up (Continued: Page 3, Col. 7.) Saxbe said he had provided even know tho unit existed.     incn(    democrats . otio Eck-i but denied he ever contemplate indicted ’by a the committee all justice de- At an emotional press confer-    atmocrdis uuu i ,     v    ,Deen    inaicitu uy partment files on the wiretap- ence during President Nixon’s stein, a member of the Council|ed anything illegal. .    ,    ,    I    ping and on the plumbers. But recent Middle East tour, Kis-i® economic Advisors in A loser is a guy whose junk saxbe said the bulk of the docu-1 singer threatened to resign! Kennedy administration, and are charged with violating the volving contractors and devel ments were based forms” written mail comes postage due. Cancer ^d on “narrative! unless the committee cleared I Charles Schult ze, budget direc-jcivil rights of the psychiatrist, lopers seeking U. S. housing con- {from his seat, which he has held j campa ig n tre by Hoover. him of such allegations.    I (Continued: Page 3, Col. 5.)    Lewis bielding of Beverly tract influence.    since November, 1968.    Bastien, the hi Hills, Calif., whose office was Gurney was charged with Maximum Penalties field office in V Danger in Heavy Drinking Indicted with Gurney were: James Lee Groot, Gurney’s former administrative assistant; Earl Crittenden, former 3P 1 1 Anderson, WASHINGTON (AP) - A new federal report says moderate drinking may be beneficial to some people, but that heavy drinking and smoking combined greatly increases the risk of mouth and throat cancer. “The wide range of devastating problems associated with the use of alcohol all relate to excessiveness — not moderation,” said Dr. Morris Chafetz. director of the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism. “This demands that we, as a society, begin to exercise a sufficient measure of individual and social responsibility in our use of beverage alcohol — a responsibility that has been seriously lacking.” “Definitely Related” The report was sent to congress by the department of Health, Education and Welfare as Chafetz outlined its findings Wednesday to a White House seminar for health writers. Cancers of the mouth, pharynx, larynx and esophagus and primary cancer of the liver “appear to be definitely related to heavy alcohol intake in the U. S. and parts of the world where these occur with high frequency in men,” the report said. It found that heavy drinkers and smokers run a 15-times-greater risk of developing cancer of the mouth and throat than abstainers. According to the report, moderate drinking is considered to be consumption of up to three ounces of whisky, a half bottle of wine or four glasses of beer daily. Beyond that level, a drinker runs nearly 24 times greater risk of oral cancer, about the same as a person who smokes 40 or more cigarets daily, the report said. Compounded Chafetz said that for reasons that remain unclear to researchers, the over-all risk of mouth and throat cancer is greatly compounded for people who both drink and smoke heavily. However, ho told the seminar: “There is no evidence that the moderato use of alcohol is harmful to health. Moderate drinkers, as a statistical group, live longer than abstainers or ex-drinkers.” Teenage Drinking Chafetz said moderate drinkers have a lower rate of heart attacks and that “moderate alcohol use may be physically, psychologically and socially beneficial to active and institutionalized older people.” The HEW official emphasized that the report does not contend that heavy drinking causes cancer, but he said there is a clear statistical correlation between the two. Chafetz said an increase in heavy teen-age drinking “just blows my mind. It worries me greatly.” He cited a study reporting that 14 percent of male high school seniors admit they get drunk at least once a week, with 46 percent of all seniors saying they get drunk at least four times a year. The study this past spring involved 14,000 youths in grades 7 through 12. JACKSONVILLE. Fla. (AP) —lean, and I will be vindicated.” R-Fla.) has! Gurney has maintained all federal along that the grand jury inves-grand jury in connection with avigation is part of a political thej Ehrlichman and three others $233,000 fund-raising effort in- 1 vendetta against him by his Florida GOP chairman; George .‘vol-1 enemies seeking to oust him Anderson the senator’s 1968 treasurer; Joseph head of Gurney’s -      Winter    Park;    and broken into Sept. 3,1971.    bribery, conspiracy, taking part    p B A officials Wayne Swiger Ehrlichman is also charged in a cover-up and lying to the The maximum penalties for an( j m. Koontz, with four counts of lying to the    special grand jury. The panel    all of the various charges    mHirtment savs    -i Unrnrv FBI and a federal grand jury.    returned the indictment    against Gurney total 42 years in     l ae _ ia<3 ; lr P; ‘     a ^ rncy L ' Wednesday after a 10-month in- prison and at least $80,000 in Meetings    vestieation.    fines. The fine could be much    ,    Crittenden    on    Jan.    9, Circling dates on a large cal-,     No arraignment date was set    larger if the fine for bribery is •     haH VurtK^r ri^sruSdnrTwlfh rn? endar with a red wax pencil,    f or Gurney or the six other men    calculated at three times the     hdc ^l further discussion    with Crit- Merrill recounted a series of indited with him.    : amount of the bribe, as provid-' lenaen ed by law. meetings involving Ehrlichman (Continued: Page 3. Col. 5.) Today s Index Comics 29 Crossword ...... 29 Daily Record s Deaths ........3 Editorial Features 6 Farm ..... 25 Financial 30 Marion 19 Movies 26 Society .......... 16-18 Sports ......... 21-24 State .. ............. 4.5 Television 28 Want Ads.......... 32-37 Innocent Gurney, the first U. S. senator t in 50 years to be indicted while in office, said he is innocent. “I have an abiding faith in the American system of justice and firmly believe that 1 will be proved innocent of any wrong-j doing in this affair,” said Gurney. 60, of Winter Park. Gurney, a member of the senate Watergate committee and a staunch supporter of President Nixon both on the committee and off, is up for re-election this year. Florida Republican Chairman L E. Thomas said the indictment “dealt a mortal blow” to Gurney's re-election bid. But Gurney said: “I intend to fight this move just as hard as I SEN. GURNEY and Anderson a week later. Fund-Raising “On or about Jan. 19, 1971, Edward J. Gurney, James L. Groot, Earl M. Crittenden, Jo-j seph Bastien and George Ander-I son met at the home of Edward J. Gurney in Winter Park, at which time they discussed the setting up of a fund-raising operation for the benefit of Edward J. Gurney and decided to hire Larry E. Williams as the fund-raiser,” according to the I indictment. The grand jury said Gurney lied when he testified under oath before the grand jury on May 13-14 that he didn’t know until June, 1972, that Williams (Continued: Page 3, Col. 6.) VOLUME 92 NUMBER 183