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Cedar Rapids Gazette Newspaper Archive: July 9, 1974 - Page 1

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Publication: Cedar Rapids Gazette

Location: Cedar Rapids, Iowa

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   Cedar Rapids Gazette (Newspaper) - July 9, 1974, Cedar Rapids, Iowa                                Weather- I'arlly cloudy wild a chance uf raiii Wednes- day, laws, mid 70s. Highs Wednesday in mid 90s. VOU'.MK 92 XL'.MUKK CITY FINAL CKDAK KAI'IDS. IOWA, Ti'KSDAY, Jl.'I.Y 9, 1974 15 CENTS ASSOCIATED PHKSS I'FJ XK'W YORK TI'T Police Feel Skeleton Isj U.S. Envoy! HERMOS1LLO. Mexico (Al'.ij Sonnra stale police liope to establish Hie identification Tues- day of a skeleton they believe toj be that of U.S. Vice-consul John Patterson, who was kid-j naped "March 22. Lt. Col. Francisco the state police chief, said he sure" the remains found in a dry ercekbcd about eight miles northwest of Her- mosillo were Patterson's. He said he hoped Mrs. Patterson would arrive Tuesday to try to make the identification. U.S. Embassy officials in Mex- ico City said Mrs. Patterson would not make the trip. Arellano said a gold ring found on one Finger of the skele- ton carried the initials JLP and AML and it was believed these stood for John L. Patterson and Andra M. Latour, Mrs. Patter- son's maiden name. In Philadelphia, Patterson's sister, Joan Patterson Del Pozzo, said her brother's middle initial was "S" and not "L''. The U.S. state department said its records showed "S" as the middle initial. Arellano said the skeleton was wearing torn clothes, including a blue jacket, blue pants, brown socks, an indigo tie and black boots. He said they checked with the description of the clothes Patterson was wearing when he was last seen leaving the U.S. consulate in Hermosillo on the morning of March 22 with an unidentified man. Arellano said the skull of the skeleton had been fractured, in the front and at the base, "ap- parently bashed in with a heavy metal object. The skeleton also had a pelvic fracture, but the coroner's office believes that's an old fracture. The body apparently had been buried in the dry creekbed near a dirt path, but recent heavy rains uncovered the remains, Arellano said. The skeleton was found by a man looking for fruit. Terrorists? It was at first believed that Patterson's kidnapping was the work of leftist Mexican terror- ists. But on June 7 Bobby Joe Keesee. a California carpenter and self-styled soldier of for- tune, was indicted by a federal grand jury in San Diego, Calif., on charges of planning and tak- ing part in the kidnaping. to Subpoena by Ehrlichman Defense f w II fllJIil 1 PI IS WASHI.NGTON An MADRID il.'I'li Secretary "If you're referring to myl .v..-m.- Kissinger said Tuesday frame of mind at the time of the ;i: l.'indon he would fly back to, Aug. 11 memo, my mind just 'V.-i.-hington and appear as dwell on the various pos-j d'-H-na- witness Wednesday onisibiiitics. .My mind didn't run; b'-h.-df of John Ehrlichman in, over Hie various means or Kll.sbc-rg breakin trial. He i Khrlichman said. lin-ii Ili-w to Spain on the lastj Ehrlichman initialed his an-' .--.'ageof his six-nation European to thci.cyAug_ mcm'0 1 attorney told the house judi- i recommending a "covert opera- tial'y committee Tuesday thai Kissinger was directed Mon-jtion" to obtain Ellsberg's psy-jhe received a check tr> appear as a defense Schiatric files, but has testified i from his client, E Howard witness on behalf of Ehrlich-'he "certainly did not" know it Hlln. k man. President Nixon's former! referred to a breaking and en- 1 S g P No. 2 aide. Bering. j age which reportedly contained I Kissinger was ordered to tes- 1 Surprise Witness a 575-000 payment from Presi- lify about whether he or Nixon j A defense witness !-dcnt Nixon's re-election corn- were at the top of a chain of william all miltee. command that Ehrlichman says I William Billman, whose led to his authorizing a "covert! (Continued: Page 3, Col. 8.) j lengthy testimony threatened to I operation" against Daniel Ells-j delay for one day the appear- River Rescue Rolls Denial Expected Kissinger was expected to deny testimony that he, along vith Ehrlichman, gave the orders for a psychological pro- lie of Ellsberg. David Young, a co-director of the While House Plumbers Unit" tracing na- .ional security leaks, had tes- :ified the two were responsible for the Ellsberg action. Kissinger said in London be- A weeping Linda Sandback, 27, of Boston is rescued from the Charles river by Patrolman Joseph Turner Fireman Joseph Simpson (top) and Patrolman Charles Dolan after she apparently fell from the Harvard bridge Monday. The three men jumped into the water when they saw the woman lose her grip on one of the bridge's slippery support pillars. All four clung to ropes until the boat arrived. Jury Hears Henley Confession to Some of Houston Mass Murders Israelis i By Associated Press innocent Keesee. 40, pled in U.S. district Diego on June 20 and is being Held in jail in lieu of bail. Keesee (Continued SAN ANTONIO, Texas i API-1 being paid for each teen- "I killed several of them my- aged male many of them his bodies, six of which remain uni-! The Israeli navy shelled three dentified. Henley said in his statement day night, sinking more than to Mullican that he was in- self wilh Dean's gun and helped friends and neighbors he pro- u, n-u cured for Dean Corll, 33. who him choke some others. Then has been described by police as to Tori I hv Brooks' we would take them and bury the leader of a homosexual he was 14 i them in different places." ture and murder ring. So reads a statement Elmer: Wayne Henley, an 18-year-old ports in southern Lebanon Mon- high school dropout, gave police after hia arrest in connection with the slaying of 27 young men in the Houston massj murders case. j The statement, taken lastj" Aug. 9 by Sgt. David Mullican j' Helped Kill 6 j longed to an organization out of Henley said in the statement! DaIIas that bought and sold he gave Mullican that he' helped bovs- ran whores and dope and kill and bury al least six Of j stuff _ like that. Dean told __ me score of fishing boats in retalia- tion for the Palestinian guerilla I raid by sea two weeks ago on Nahariya. Palestinian guerillas vowed a new round of rcprisa raids. The Israeli military command Corll's youthful victims. Henley was arrested last Aug. after he phoned police and told them he shot and killed of the police department in the Houston suburb of Pasadena, read into the court record Monday as testimony started inj Henley's murder trial, being! held here on a change of venue. i Corll following an all-night sex Olull UftC Ulal. utall LUIU 111C -j -i l I u J- said it had numerous mdica- that he would pay me 200 a mn least for every boy that I could I bring him and maybe more if luuvy.viuti an uii-iiitui. party at Corll's ,Bu they were real good looking." Henley said he refused at the preparing more seaborne at- i tacks. The command said its raid on the ports was intended said a year later Pasadena. slaying was J b helped Corll lure a "i to "disrupt the preparations and Pinst t'he'use of to the Corll apartment and trick uth Davjd into on 'handcuffs.! said he left and the ncxtl has bee" "laiged in, four of he 27 deaths. Brooks i- i is charged with six of istnct cour at and bej ,rf d trial date has not been set. for the six deaths. As the jury of six men and six- y day was paid by Corll. "Then a day or so later I found out that Dean had killed teenager i harbors., by the gucrillas. InH d-inl- I Israel said attack was "lim- ited in and every at- tempt was made to avoid inju- ries to civilians. The Lebanese government reported one cas- fore leavin appear." for Madrid: "I will To Smas Election Win TORONTO (AP) Canadian voters swept Prime Minister Trudeau's ruling Liberal party back into power in a smashing victory that gave him a solid majority in the house of com- imons and the prospect of five I more years in the office he has i held since April, 1968. I Complete returns from Mon- Kissinger had let Nixon after io eiimmir nrinfpr _ the Moscow summit and briefed Western leaders in Brussels, Paris, Rome, Bonn and London before flying here for talks with Premier Carlos Arias Navarro and Spanish Foreign Minister Pedro Cortina. finishing, seven hours on the stand, testified Tuesday he would not have con- doned the "covert operation" against Ellsberg had he known it involved a breakin. Ehrlichman and three others are in the ninth day of their trial for violating the civil rights of Dr. Lewis Fielding, Ellsberg's psychiatrist. "Do you think the breakin al Fielding's office could be con- doned on national security associate Watergate prosecutor William Merrill asked. "As a matter of personal opin- ion. I think the investigation as originally conceived was grounded in national Ehrlichman replied. "If you mean the actual acts that were committed, I don't condone them on any grounds." Memo e who was Iislencd- Disfrict Attor-iliccman J. B. Jamison killing the youth, Corll had The Lebanese defense mi 1'iey Carol Vance read the stale-jthat Henley told them about the.homosexually raped him. istry reported 21 fishing boa mued: Page 3, Col. 5.) ,ment in which Henley told of slayings and led them to 27; waj of the! sunk: 10 at Tvre. at Sarafar :present in the doctor's office1'" Top Klan Post at 195 Owes It All to Carnegie Course "Did you know that one of the possibilities of examination of the doctor's files, which you had "Ran Whores, Dope" n civilian wounded by Mullican and Pasadena po-j statement. Henley said that be- an explosion in Sidon. m'" Merrill asked boats Sarafand whole thing." the statement1 and one at Sidon. An Isruhi said. "And since then, I have spokesman claimed about iO( helped Dean get other boys. I sunk, or aboul 10 in each port don't remember exactly how The Palestine guerilla head- many." quarters in Beirut said Israeli "I shot Charles (Cobble, 18) in frogmen blew up wooden jetties ilhc head wilh Dean's pistol .at Tyre, but the Israeli in (Continued: Page 7. Col. I.I i (Continued: Page Col. 4.1 commons, a majority of 16. This represented a gain of 31 seats over their showing in the 1972 election. Lost Badly The other three parties lost] ground badly. Roberl Stanficld's Progressive Conservatives won 95 seals, a loss of 12. The New Democrats dropped from 31 to 16, and party leader David Lewis lost his own seat in par- liament. The Social Credit party dropped from 15 seats to 12, and one independent was elected. It was a stunning comeback for the 54-year-old Trudeau. He came within two seats of losing the government to Stanfield in 1972, and only the support ol Lewis and the New Democrats enabled him to hold on for 19 months al the head of a minori- ty government. Now he can gov- ern without the support of any other party. Pollsters and political ana- lysts had predicted a tight race, but the Liberals took an early lead in the Atlantic Maritime provinces and wrapped up the election in Ontario, the most populous province. Inflation, now running a nearly 11 percent, was the bigj issue in the campaign. Stanfield ar.ce of former Attorney Gen- eral Mitchell, told the commit- tee he did not knowlingly ac- cepl money illegally for Hunt. Hunt, convicted for his part in the Watergate breakin, re- portedly received the in exchange for his silence aboul the burglary. The committee is trying to determine whether the hush money payments which Hunt had demanded were made with Nixon's prior knowledge. The President has said he firsl Panel To Release Transcripts Today WASHINGTON (AP) The house judiciary committee is ready to make public its tran- scripts of eight presidential conversations and an analysis of how its versions differ from those released by the White House. Release is scheduled lor late today. learned of Hunt's demand on March 21, 1973. Received Reps. Fish (R-N.Y.) and Lott (R-Miss.) told reporters aboul Bitlman's closed-door testimony when the committee broke for lunch. Fish said Bittman delivered a package lo Hunt on the eve- ning of March 21, bul did not know whal it contained. In April, 1973, Bittman received a check from Hunt for for legal fees which had accrued up to March 30, Fish said Bitt- man testified. Lott said that "Bittman made it clear he did not think the money was for and (Continued- HOUSTON CAP) Dimmie John- son, elected a Grand Dragon of the Ku Klux Klan at 19, says he owes it all to a Dale Carnegie personality improvement course. Johnson, a Houston machinist, said the Carnegie course "has really helped me in the Klan work. I've shown a great improvement." He was elected Grand Dragon of the Texas Fiery Knights of the Ku Klux Klan at a meeting Sunday in Dallas. Johnson beat out two other men for the No. 2 post in the Fiery Knights behind Imperial Wizard Scott Nelson of Houston, who cslimales membership at 200. Johnson said ho has been in the KKK about a year and i.s anxious In use his new position In improve Ihc image of the organization. "Our major problem in public re- lations is the image of the Klan." he said in a telephone interview. "We're Irving lo slay away from Mils violent sort of Iliing. Kvery now and I lien gel somebody in who wrnts this violence thing, but 1 don'l know anybody in it now who believes that way, although we're not going lo be pushed around by other peo- ple He said he joined "because I'm a while racist and I believe in Ihc sep ar.ition of Ihc races and I believe the Klar, i.s Iho best way of achieving thai goal." Johnson, a bachelor, said his ac- tive membership in the Klan hasn't affected his personal life, hut he said, "I don'l find many girls who think as I do on this. A girl won't expound on racisl idca.s as readily as a man will." He said some Klan members have hfd trouble wilh employers, bul he said there's been no noticeable offer! al Ihc sheet melal firm where he uurks. "People jusl seem In accept it." said Johnson. "I'm planning on running for poli- tical office one day, probably as a slate he said. "I don't know if Ihc Klan will help or not." Nivon Summons Economists, Businessmen on Inflation WASHINGTON lAI'i newest clforl 10 irient Nixon is calling more than deal with double-digit inflation. la score of the naliou's business At Tuesday's While Housi 'leaders and best-known ccouo- meeting. Hush saiii there was a mists to a White House meeting'discussion o! efforts to Irim the !Thursday lo urge restraint iiiicurri'nl federal budget below coping with the nation's eni-'tlii- target uf billion. He nomic problems his lllp administration's pohcv coordinator said Rumc I thr meeting after he I economic advisors "We are very strongly com counsellor iwh nelh Rush disclosed plans liSht fiscal policy, no con and mrl for aboul DO minutes wilh Nixon to discuss ways In cope with whal he as the evils of inflation. Hush himself has hern holding White House meetings wilh business and labor rrpi'fsenl- ativcs, bul the Thursday intrrrupicd marks Ihc first in- doing it. volvrmrnt hv Nixon in Ihc ad- and prices. lax increase and certainly no tax decrease." Today's Chuckle Tin- world is moving so fast Ihrse days Ilia! Ihc man who says il can't be done Is gencr- hy someone Convrlnltt that the attorney told the com- mittee his firm had received from the Nixon com- mittee for legal fees and the care of Hunl and his family. LaRue Presidential lawyer James St. on Clair is attacking the charge- that Nixon approved the pay- ment in order to keep Hunt from talking about "seamy tilings" he idid for the White House. Mon- jday, however, one of his wit- nesses, Frederick LaRue, re- portedly was not as strong a (Continued: Page 3, Col. 6.) Academy Dismisses 7 Middies for Cheating i ANNAPOLIS, Md. U.S. Naval Academy announced Tuesday that it has dismissed seven midshipmen for cheating on a navigations examination May. Vice-admiral William Mack, academy superintendent, said an additional n midshipmen were placed on honor probation following a lengthy examination into Ihc cheating incident. Today's Index "Oh joy, Oh Margaret Trudoau seems to be saying as she exults in her husband's elec- tion victory. Comics 19 Crossword 19 Daily Record :i Deaths 3 Kditorinl Features ii Farm 10 Financial 21) Marion 18 Society Sports State 8 15-17 Television Want Ads   

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