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Cedar Rapids Gazette: Sunday, July 7, 1974 - Page 126

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   Cedar Rapids Gazette (Newspaper) - July 7, 1974, Cedar Rapids, Iowa                                Want Ads Financial Section ii Sunday, July 7, 1974 ChiSox Hang On, Win, 9-8 DETROIT i.M'i Home runs by Carlus May. Dick Allen and Rill Melton helped Chicago to a lead after five innings and the While Sox huny on for a 0-8 victory over the Detroit Tigers Saturday. The White Sox slaked Wilbur Wood to a G-ll lead with six runs in the second inning off Luke Walker. 4-1. May "blasted a three-run bonier in the inning. Ken Henderson singled in a run and Ron Santo singled in two. In the fifth. Allen and Melton hit ho m e r s off Dave Lemanczyk. Allen's homer, his 21st. bounced off the Tiger Sta- dium roof in left field. Bucky Dent also singled in a run in the inning. Rut the Tigers scored five times on six hits off Wood in the fifth. Ei'.' Brinkman hit a homer. Willie Hortnn a two-run triple, and Jim North- rup an RBI single. CHICAGO DETROIT ab r h bi ab r h b Richard 2b 3100 MStanley cl 5123 2b 0000 Suthrland 2b 5 1 2 0 3113 Kalins dh .1120 1000 WHorton If J 1 3 2 4111 Sharon If 0000 4211 Northrtlp rf 5011 .1211 Freehan lb 5010 4120 ARodrnei 3b 5 0 0 0 5122 Moses c 5220 4010 EBrnkmn ss 4232 JOll uwalker D 0000 0000 Lemncvk o 0000 0000 Stavback D 0000 jfive hits off loser .lot? Decker. 8-8. who leu in ihe eighth. Three double plays in the first five innings aided Cham- pion. IM. Ueorge Scott walked to open ,the Brewer second, but was 'thrown out trying io steal. How-, ever, Decker walked Mike He-. gan and Darrell Porter and both scored on May's double down the right field line. MINNESOTA MILWAUKEE 3 0 1 0 Money 3b -102 1000 Your.! ss 401 3 0 0 0 Brians if 300 4020 Scci! lb 300 3000 Heaan rf I 1 0 -'.010 Berrv cl 1 0 0 3020 Porter c 210 3 0 0 0 cih 0 3000 Mitchell pr 0 0 0 2000 DMav cf 301 1 0 0 0 Coluccio rf 0 0 D 0000 TJohtTiOn 2b 3 I 0 0000 Chmnion D 000 0 0 0 0 EdRriaez o 000 0000 TMurohy P 000 Terrell. Minnesota 1, waukee 3. Minnesota 5, Mil 4. SB-D.May. Decker I Burameier j Chamoion C.VJ-1) EdRdqei IT.MurDhv Save-EdRdcjez aukee1 BB SO: IP H R ER 7 5 3 2 -J 2 1-30 0 0 0 0 2-30 0 0 0 0 5 2-3 5 0 0 2 3 21-31 0 0 0 O 1 0 0 0 0 1 A-11.550. CMav If Sharo If DAIIen lb Melton dh KHndrsn cf Downina rf Santo 3b Dent ss Wood o Forster p Total 36 9 10 9 Total 42 8 16 Chicnqo 060 030 Detroit 000 053 1. caao 7, Detroit 10. KHenderson, Downing. D.Allen Melton E.Brink------ M.Stanley SB-Melton. IP H R ER BB SO Wood 5 10 5 5 1 0 Forster J 63312 L Walker fi 12-34 6 6 2 Lemanczyk 3 4333: Slavback J1-3 2 0 0 1 Forstei May Aids Brewers 3-0 MILWAUKEE (AP) Dave May's two-run double in the second inning and six-hit pitch- ing by Billy Champion and Eduardo Rodriguez swept the Milwaukee Brewers to a 3-0 victory over the Minnesota Twins Saturday. May's double was one of only Belt 5-3 BOSTON (AP) The Kansas iCity Royals belted Boston start- ler Rick Wise for 10 hits in less I than five innings and went on jto a 5-3 victory over the slump- ing Red Sox Saturday in a na- l i o n a 11 y televised baseball game. Amos Otis, Hal McRae, Tony jsolaita and Fran Healy had two hits apiece in helping the Roy- to their fifth victory in the Mast seven games. A New Look for Yankee Sfadium Joe DiMaggio, former New York Yankee great, stands on a n elevated subway station to look over the field where he made baseball history, Yankee stadium. The stadium is being refurbished for play in 1976. Patek ss Roias ;b Otis cf KANSAS CITY ab r h bi i 0 1 0 5011 2 0 (acKae n 5121 Cowens rf 0000 Mavberrv dh 3 1 1 0 Solaita lb 4111 Wohlford If 3000 GBrett 3b Briles p Fitsmrris D Healy i 4000 0000 0000 3121 BOSTON ab r h bi Harper If 5010 Griffin 2b 4010 Coooer dh 5111 Yztrmaki lb 3000 DEvans rf 4120 Pefrocelli 3b 4 1 1 2 RMrller cf 4010 Guerrero ss 2010 Burleson ss 1010 Blackwell c 2 0 0 0 McAulife oh 1000 Mntqmry c 1000 Huqhes pr 0000 Wise D 0000 Cleveland p 0000 Total 37 3 10 3 fins Schrader AMERICAN LEAGUE East Cleveland Boston Baltimore Detroit Milwaukee New YorK Jl L 35 38 Pet. .557 .5J4 2, Patek. Cilv 1, Boston 1. City 9, Boston 9. D.Evans, McRae. Petrocelli CooDcr (7) McRae, Harper. IP H R ER BB SO 51-37 3 3 1 31 32-33 0 0 0 0 5 5 2 3 -12-31 0 0 4 2 A-; Briles (W.l-2) Fitimorris Wise (L-3-4) Cleveland Orioles End As String 5> j Chicago Minnesota 35 -lo .432 10' 3 California 32 52 .391 15 Saturday's Results Kansas City 5- Boston 3 Chicago 9, Detroit B Milwaukee 3, Minnesota 0 Baltimore 3, Oakland New York 9, Texas 3 Cleveland 1, California 0 Pitchers Today Chicaao (Johnson o-O or Aloran 1-3) a Detroit (Lolich o.m. Kansas City (McDaniel 1-3 and Dal Canton 4-4) at Boston (Moret 1-2 and Lee 2, 1 p.m. Minnesota (Butler 3-3 and Corbin 5-1) at Milwaukee (Colborn 4-5 and Rcdrinuez or Travers 2, 2 r.m. Baltimore (McNsJIv 7-6) at Oakland (Holtzman o.m. Cleveland (J. Perry 7-7] a! California (Tanana 5 p.m. New York (Dobson 6-10) at Texas (Har- oan 6--0, 9 p.m, j OAKLAND (AP) Ross. jGrimsley fired a five-hitter and! I Brooks Kobinson and Paul !Blair homered as (he Baltimore Orioles snapped Oakland's five- !game winning streak 3-0 Satur- :dav. BALTIMORE OAKLAND ab r h bi ab r h bi i Blair cf J 1 I North cf 4020! .Grich 2b 4020 Campnris ss 4020! JTDavis dh J 0 i 0 Bando 3h 4 0 0 Oi EWillams lb 4 0 0 0 RJackson rf 4 o 0 0: Baylor If 4000 Rudi If 3010 BRobinsn 3b -i 1 2 1 Tenace lb 3000 F-uiler rf 3000 Mannuai rih 3000' Etchebrn c 3110 Kubiak 2b 1000 Rojanner ss 301 f JAlou ph l 0 0 0 Grimsley p 0000 Maxvill 2b 0000 McKiney 2b 1000 Hanev c .1000. Hamilton p 0 0 0 0! Odom n 0 o 0 0. NATIONAL U'JAGUK Tol-il .13 3 0 3 Tola] 31 0 5 0' Me i real Pittsburgh ChicdQO New York Los DiEOO chco 37 .J14 Saturday's Results Atlanla 3, Chicago 2, 10 inning San Francisco 5. New York 7 '.t LOUIS J. Cincinnati 1 Philadelphia San Dieao 2 "oritreai A, Anneles 1 Houston 1, Piltsburtjh 0 Pitchers Tods" (C.ipra 9-2) at Chicnc.o IReus- cbrl 2.15 P m. St Loui. (Forr.ch 00 ami Thomnstm 0- 1) at CmunnHli (Gullo! B-A .mil Carroll 5- Lo' lolm I? and Rau A'5J dt Monlre.il' lor re; 7-S and HcMola l-Oi, 2. S.in Dieno (Jonrs 5-151 .it Philadelphia {Lonbora f-Ji o.m. San Francisco (Rrvant 7-10) at New York fSravrr 2'QS o m Pilhhuroh (Ronkrr 5 ft)   til ,ib r I) hi i M.ulriox rf 5 2 0 Towir rf 513 0: iRWhilp It 4110 DNclson ?h JMurcor rl 5 1 3 .1 AJohnsn H S 1 1 O1 1 niomhcrq dh ri (1 1 1 Rurruqln r( 3013 iGNCttlpr, .1200 l.ovillo rt 0000 jChmhliss lb .S 1 1 3 Harrjrnvo dh ,1000! c 4172 Spcnrcr lb 401 0; iMrisnn ss 3010 R.indlc .11) 4030' ?h T 1 0 n H.irrah 4010 0000 f.unclhfrq c .iHrown Sunday's Games rd.ir R.tiniK .il Annlfldii nVi.itui .ii riliiltin W.ilnloo .il Wltcorr.ln IMi'id'. (V) Ou.Hl f.llio-. Now Yuik nn i i on 9 ?U Murtrr Mr .luhMMm, R While f SB Mcdif It IW.9 j.Hrown fliunuis Clvrip i A 241 9 701 000000- 3 Nrw Ynrk ft, Tfv.n rr.ili. .SurnriT, :W Munson n.Nch.on, RrtiKlln. ic M R R nn so V HI .1 f, s i :t v 9 v .s ;i n i ii o o o 32-3 1 0 0 0 4 73 All-Americans? "Before your fine sports department gives the No. 1 college football rating to Ohio State, Notre Dame or the letter says, "would like to make a case in behalf of Oklahoma." Well, sure, we would. Only thing is the let- ter came from one Carl S. Grisham of St. Louis, who must be the biggest Big Red fan of them all. What's more, his letter is a duplicat- ed copy which we assume he sent to many other newspapers. So how does he know we ALL have "fine" sports departments? Grisham sure does have a crush on Oklahoma football. He encloses a list of the entire Sooner squad. At most schools they would call this a "three-deep" roster. In Oklahoma's case, it is NINE-dccp at some positions, and at least five-deep at all of them. "Players encircled arc 1974 potential all- notes Grisham. "Players marked wilh have future ail-American potential." Guess what. He encircled 15 "1D7-1 potential all-Americans" and put an "X" by no fewer than 58 others! We met Oklahoma coach Barry Switzer at the National Football Coaches Assn. golf tour- ney al Hot Springs, Ark., recently. First ques- tion we asked him: Does he believe Grisham is correct in raling his Sooners so highly? "Don't believe I know replied thoughtfully, "lie claims we're that good, huh? Are you sure he's really trying lo do us a Forget Ohio, Michigan (irishnm also has done a thorough job of comparing schedules of the lop learns. He draws Ihis conclusion: .11 is very easy for a lop school to piay a weak schedule and make Ihemself isici look like a real powerhouse. "Also think any team Ilia! does not play a full schedule (II games) should not he ranked in the lop ten. Teams like Ohio Slate and Nntrc Dame only play 10. This gives them an extra week's rest and practice time." He airily dismisses Ihe oilier lop contenders as follows: Ohio only 111 games, of which Iwii are against lop and Michigan Slate (and Ihere is a quesliou about Michigan Slatel." Nellie plays only III. Will play only Hirer top learns- Purdue. Pill and South- ern Cal, which arc spaced nut, making Ihis a very push over schedule." Prim Stale- "Will play tiuir decent teams out of II. They are In he given some credit for up-grading, as Ihey usually play only one or Iwo lop Iranm every year. Would mil. he surprised if Stanford, Maryland, N.C. State and Pitt beat them." do play Stanford, Colora- do, Michigan State, Purdue and Ohio State. This still leaves them with six cinch wins." have six real wcakies on their schedule." Bear also has six shoo- ins." also have only five top teams on their schedule." do play five lop teams in Colorado, Tennessee. Texas Ags. Mississippi and Alabama. Again no Oklahoma, Nebraska, Ohio Stale, Michigan, Notre Dame, Missouri or Penn State to upset their apple cart." Money in the Bank Texas decent games with lop learns. After Texas. Texas Ags, Oklahoma Stale and Arkansas their schedule looks like money in the bank." also have only Texas Tech, Oklahoma. Arkansas. Texas Ags and Baylor who can be considered better teams." Nebraska should be completely jelled by Ihe lime they open with four straight push-overs." you will agree Missouri ;md Oklahoma have the toughest schedules of any top teams. Besides the Big Eight. Mis- souri has Mississippi, Baylor and Arizona Stale (plus By now you must be wondering who the heck Oklahoma has scheduled. Maybe 11 pro teams, huh? No. Grisham brushes aside the fact Ihe .Sooners face Ulan Stale and Wake Forest a pair to draw loll, and he doesn't even mention Baylor, which is not ex- actly scaring opponents into cardiac arrest of lale'. And even though we all agree Ihe Big Kight has been awfully rugged lalely. certainly a team bidding for Ihe litlr of Toughest Sched- ule couldn't get many points for facing Iowa Slate and Kansas Stale, which had 4-7 records lasl year. Come to think of it. Oklahoma lasl year was lied by USC, which lost to Notre Dame and Ohio State. And the Sooncrs barely heal a Miami (Kla.l team 21-20. Their IM-17 victory over Iowa Slate wasn't a bell-ringer. But we are afraid lo argue with Grisham. Not when he fearlessly points out: "Oklahoma has perfect balance. I am sure any of Ihe IS players (Ihe ones wilh po- tential would be stars on any college learn in Ihe country. From kickolfs, field goals, piinling. kick relunis and offense and defense, Ihcy would be Idler perlrcl. "Pul this all together with Ihe country's top young coach and his hand-picked slafl and you end up wilh Ihi; country's lop team. Thanks for your consideration." Signed: Carl S. Grisham. Cindy Hose .MIAMI i.M'i Veli-ran ccn- I'.T Jim Lanyer of the Miami Dolphins Saturday he will ignore thi; picket line and re- port to camp and even if most of his tcammatt.s v.ant to play in the College All-Star game they probably won't get the chance. Langer .said the Football League Players' Asso- ciation may be able to stop Ihe game simply by setting up a picket line. "Other unions would honor a picket line and then there would be no lights, no one to sell tickets, no ushers, and no Langer told The i Associated Press. "A lot more people are involved in a game jthan football players." 1 Langer said the decision to play or not would have to be made by each individual play- er. Want To Play still say 80 per cent of the i Dolphins want to play the I game." he said, repeating a 'statement he had made earlier Jin the week. "I'm not saying jthey will all come out for camp or will do absolutely anything to play the game, but not play- ing is a hard thing to swallow." low." Langer said he would ignore the strike, report to camp and be ready for the July 26 All- Star game in Chicago. He said (some other Dolphins also plan to cross picket lines but de- clined to identify them. Tight end Jim Mandich said Friday night he would not honor (he picket line. i Union United "I want to play the All-Star jgame but I do understand the Wis. LarryIficulty Elenes encountered point of Langer Elenes pitched and batted thejroute to the victory, only hisjsaid. "The union is united and Cedar Rapids Astros to a 3-2] third in nine decisions. behind their cause. They be- Midwest baseball league victory j He fanned 13. walked four andjlieve if we play the All-Star it over Appleton here seven hits. (will loosen the morale around night. But to get the win, he had league and they don't want Telcphclo APPLETON. The AsUos, who had been come through with a double "But I don't think thev should Clinton's victim by the same 3-2 turned the tide in the seventh. count in Cedar Rapids Friday The Astros began their able to decide for us about night, opened the scoring withjning rally wilh two down. 'the he added. "Most Rafael Tatis' solo home run in; After Stan Floyd drilled a of the Dolphins can sacrifice the lop of the fourth. single to center, Jorge Moreno the game check. But we earned Appleton bounced righl back [sent him home with a bad-hop the right to play in that game." to take a 2-1 lead in the botlonijdouble over third. 1 On Friday, Ed Garvey, exec- ;of the fourth on Larry Wallers'; Elenes then delivered a director of the NFLPA, single and Kevin Bell's homendoublc over third, and Floyd said that any veteran players down the left field line. sprinted in with the winning who decide to play in the "Ail- That was Ihe only serious [star Game would have to cedar Rapids Appicton J "walk through a mighty hefty o o wicdrano.cf .2 2 o line." ]io said that at least 20 Dol- 4 i ojphins had agreed to picket the 3 i o; Sunday opening of the squad's .3 i o I training camp at Riscayne col- 'o o oilege when rookies and nonregu- o S o liars are scheduled lo report. are lo report June M. 30 7 2 Welty an A Aurora Traveras.ss Perei.lb 1 410 Foster.lf 0 0 300 AURORA, lll.-Welty Way of Cedar Rapids split a pair of one-run decisions with Home Savings and Loan of Aurora Mis 111 Cedar Rapids a softball double header here Hollv.Dh Rudacille.Dh 33 6 3 Totals 000 100 3 000 ;00 E PHI DP- AnDletcii Cedar Rap-' ids t. LCB -AROIelo.i 7, cedar Rapids 5. ?B-Moicno, Elenes. Bell. Krutzer. IP H R ER BB SO softball power as the masters, used Saturday night. Aurora, a long-time national NFLPA Will Halt Exhibitions jtzer Combs (L, Sands a run-producing 'first-inning single and the one- jhit pitching of Dick Brubaker to j win the opener. 1-0. Welly Way came back lo win the second game, 2-1, on a iwo- by Al Rauscli. The split lefl Welly Way with man. i a season record. Home Sav- ings and Loan with a 30-2 mark. Wrlty Way 000 000 0-0 1 Aurora 100 000 B w. Gaflncr and Anderson; Brubaker 4-J) Indians Take ANA1IMM i By Bruce Lowitt 0 Associated Press Sports writer The president of the National Football League Players Asso- ciation said Saturday Hie IP East wml'tl (1" everything le- aallv within its _ Dick l .'V hibition tames if a strike liel help liom lorn Buskey Sat- urday nighl and j'ilched the Cleveland Indians inln firsl -_ place in !he American League waity way ora ioi o-j 7 o KaM wilh a 1-0 viclorv over the Aurora ocoooio-i i o I-I other veterans in Raustn and Zutcalo; Carlson and Ouinn. .'llllorilui Angels. Martin Wins 2 Features Clrn Mar- lin of Independence won the slock car feature hen1 Salurday and also look ;i rain-delayed fraluro from Wednesday nighl. LATE MODEL CLEVELAND CALIFORNIA ol> f h hi ,u> r we tn If 0 1 0 f -1 i'f t-M SPORTSMAN rc: I. not) Sduiltc, hi'lhi n, r.iti1-, 3. not) ROAnRUNNtlli I roe agents i oivd in o rain- Inn m the l-.as! Dm- in" camp. "They i rookies i can practice. all they want Curry J f j; said, "biu if Ihis thing is not settled. Ihry're mil going lo j play i he exhibition season." IMO said the NFI.I'A could 11 o o grl help from bmailraslrrs' un- ions and Ihe Teamslers In picli- i'l sladiunis. "Il nobody slums up al Ihr stadiums and noliody Ihe games, why play Ihe' games'1" he mused. Curry said he and other 'j 1 iCoiilmilcd: Page .'ID, Col. S.)   

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