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Cedar Rapids Gazette Newspaper Archive: July 7, 1974 - Page 10

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Publication: Cedar Rapids Gazette

Location: Cedar Rapids, Iowa

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   Cedar Rapids Gazette (Newspaper) - July 7, 1974, Cedar Rapids, Iowa                                1QA The Cedar Rapids Gazelle: Sun., 7. 1974 C.R. Work Stop Part of Tour for English Youth By Tom Fruchlins Downtown star may have noticed that tor the past several days, the sign atop Cedar Rapids' largest hotel has read "KL The suuth of the bonier l-'or the pasl couple of months a young man from England, whose mother and grandparents lived in Cedar Rapids, has been a jack of all traiics there. Wayne. IS. a De- cember graduate of the pres- tigious Eton college, has been spending his eight-month sab- batical from school touring the United States. He hit Cedar Rapids at the end of April, "to visit old friends of my and has been with staying with the Sutherland Cooks of 222 Cres- cent street SE. Mr. Cook, according to AHs- iair, was "an old school chum of my mother's" at Johnson grade school. Alistair's mother is the former Elaine Pailthorp, whose father was a Cedar Rapids dentist. Alistair wanted a job in Cedar Rapids to help pay for the remainder of his trek around the country, and since Cook is the president of (lie Roosevelt he became a desk clerk. This, he said, led to "some- as visitors were curious as to what a wee Eng- lish lad was doing in the heart of the Midwest. "With my accent, some peo- ple thought I was putting them on. I really didn't know how to handle it. But it was a very good experience, as I was afforded the chance to study the American public." Alter three weeks' dut1. Ihe desk. however. became a busboy. "Busing was really no! my fa- vorite duty." he admitted. "For one peop'.e thought 1 was a Cockney fun people because i was a busboy. "Then, too. 1 worked in the (irant room during breakfast, and waking up early is not my specialty. 1 was told to be there at seven, because they knew there was no way 1 could yet there by six." Next. Alistair was assigned kitchen duty, which auain Accent on Youth somewhat tickled the good hu- mored young man. "The ladies I worked with were all sweet and he commented, hedging a bit. "But it was rather overpower- ing being with them all day. There seemed to be constant bickering." Alistair's duties were varied, but he said he made enough hamburger patties to ''last me for the rest of my life." He also cooked "real south- ern fried chicken, which I found to be a bit of a joke." After three weeks here, Alistair did form one impres- sion. "For kids my age. the steady diet consists of ham- burgers, hot dogs, pizza and T- bone steaks. But with all the hamburger places, you either love them or die." ur Business! Meetings this week of public, tax-spending agencies Monday 11 a.m. Urban renewal board. Regular meeting Sixth floor conference room, city hall. p.m. Linn supervisors. Informal meeting. Room 103. courthouse. i p.m. Kirkwood Community college board of directors. Annual meeting. Linn hail board room. 6 p.m. Marion city council. Informal meeting. Council chambers, Marion city hall. 7 p.m. Marion Independent schools. Annual meet- ing. Board of education offices. p.m. County board of health. Special meet- ing. Linn supervisors will be present. Community room, Peoples Bank and Trust Co., 3570 First avenue KE. p.m. Cedar Rapids Community school dis- trict "board. Annual meeting. Board worn, Educational Sen-ice center, 346 Second avenue SW. p.m. Linn-Mar Community school board. An- nual meeting. Central administration building. 8 p.m. Hiawatha city council. Regular meeting. Hiawatha city hall council room. Tuesday a.m. Cedar Rapids city council. Informal meeting. Fourth floor council chambers, city hall. 10 a.m. Linn supervisors. Open session. Room 103, courthouse. 10 a.m. Cedar Rapids airport commission. Reg- ular meeting. Room 202, terminal building, airport. p.m. Linn county mental health advisory i board. Regular meeting. Health center building, 400 Third avenue SE. conference room 2A. p.m. District Ten drug abuse advisory coun- cil. Regular meeting. Michigan room, Iowa Memorial union, University of Iowa. 8 p.m. College Community board. Regular meet- ing. Prairie high school library. 8 p.m. Hiawatha planning and zoning commission. Regular meeting. Council room, Hiawatha city hall. Wednesday 8 a.m. Marion city council. Special meeting. Council chambers, Marion city hall. 9 a.m. Cedar Rapids city council. Regular meet- ing. Fourth floor council chambers, city hall. a.m. Regional review panel. Regular meet- ing. Lower level conference room. Linn Health center. 6 p.m. Health care for the elderly committee of the Hoover Health council. Regular meeting. Oakdale hospital Conference room, Oakdale. p.m. Board of directors of the Hoover Health council. Regular meeting. Oakdale hospital conference roam, Oakdale. Thursday a.m. Cedar Rapids planning commission. Fourth floor council chambers, city hall. 10 a.m. Linn supervisors. Open session. Room 10.1. courthouse. Community coordinating board. level conference room, Linn Health center. .Noon Recreation commission. Regular meeting. Harbour View pavilion, Kills park. p.m. Environmental review committee. Civil defense training room, basement, city hall. p.m. Marion Independent school district. Spe- cial meeting. Board of education offices. p.m. Linn county municipalities association. Ml. Vernon city hall. Friday 11 a.m. I'rban renewal board. Sixth floor conler- cncc room, city hall. 3 p.m. Handicapped systems commitlee. Regular meeting. level conference room, Linn Health center. When no: working. Alistair was entertained by my many r.e'.v friends." On his second day here, he was taken to Iowa City for a "powder puff football" game between serorities. "i jus! i-uttliin'i luiiuile liiai. l! was absolutely killing. And not only did the game amuse me but the presence of cheer- leaders was staggering. 1 just laughed all the way through it. "But what lopped every- thing was when they brought oui this immense trophy for the winner. This freaked me out." Several visits to a local c o it n t r y club also struck Wayne's wit. "I could not believe the pro- vincial snobbery that goes on. 1 found the judging of people by whether they are in the country club set a bit of a laugh. "In he continued, "there is snobbery, but of a different sort. It is more fami- ly' oriented. Money is not so important. The snobbery here killed me." He was also knocked out by what he terms "the white shoe syndrome." "The white shoes that men wear really look quite vul- gar." And the accompanying wide, white belts Alistair found equally tacky. "I was saying this to Mr. Cook one Alistair added. "And then I happened to notice that he had on white shoes. It was a bit embarras- sing." Alistair has been most im- pressed, he said, with the cul- tural climate of Cedar Rapids. Two of his favorite enter- tainments during his stay here were a performance of "A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum" by the Olde Barn Players and a show by the Cedar Rapids sym- phony orchestra. "Both were very good in- deed. They show that Cedar Rapids is an adventurous city when it comes to the arts." Young Wayne also become a Grant Wood aficionado, his chores in the Grant Wood kitchen notwithstanding. "My friends, the Cooks, took me on a memorable picnic to Stone City. The rugged sce- nery contains a softness, so wonderfully caught by Wood." Later, he said, he went to the Art center, which he Alistair Wavne thought ''fantastic. It is some- thing of which Cedar Rapi- dians should be proud. It was a pity, however, I didn't see anyone else in the center except a guard when I went." Wood's pictures of French scenery especially caught Alistair's eye, possibly bo- cause he intends to study French literature and drama at Exeter university next year. He speaks French fluently and hopes to become a pub- lisher in Paris, following in his father's footsteps. Alistair's father a news- paper writer in New York and later the managing editor of Parade magazine. Alistair and one sister were born in New York: while two older children were born in Cedar Rapids where the fam- ily lived while Mr. Wayne re- covered from tuberculosis. In 1961, mother and children moved to England and the fa- ther followed suit two years later and published the "American" newspaper. He sold this in 1969 and now is devoting his time to writing novels. One of Alistair's sisters, whose husband is a banker, now lives in New York. Alis- tair visited, and worked at a ski shop there, before coming to Cedar Rapids. Friday, he left along with Sign-Up -for Classes at Central YM This Week This week will be sign-up i Central Y staff members will week for second-half summer be available to test new mem- youth and Tiny Tots instruc- tional swimming classes at the class times will de- bers for swim classifications during fun swims from Central branch YMCA. a.m. and to 3 p.m. i New five-week sessions, with i Monday. Tuesday. Thursday I twice-weekly classes open to and Friday and from 10 to jboth boys and girls, will begin I a.m. Saturday. the week of July 15 in both pro-1 Tne youth department is closed ;on Weclnesdav during the sum- j Regular y o u t h department; mer j classes are open to youngsters! s vj f six-to-hrelvc- i are reserved for youngsters be- !'he and tween the ages of two-and-a-half and five. Aquatic Director Fred Sleeker said Saturday (hat rcgistra- Pend uPon swimming ability. tions for the two programs can j Tiny Tots classes all will be be made either in person or bypffcred in the morning, with a telephone from 10 a.m. to 4 j choice of Monday-Thursday or p.m. Monday. Tuesday. Thurs-1 Tuesday-Fr id a y attendance. day and Friday and from 9 a.m. Youngsters will be divided into to noon Saturday. i beginning and intermediate abil- i Registrations for regular levels, i.vouth classes can be made at All regular youth classes arc the youth department desk, but covered under cither annual ;Tiny Tots registrants should con-'iS201 or special summer jtact Sleeker. The Central Y: Central Y memberships. Tiny ;telephone number is 3C6-6421. Tots fees arc per ten-session Sleeker'.said the mid-summer class. 'registration period is open to Additional information, includ- 'new members as well as a full .schedule of class and girls already participating times, is available at the Cen- in the first-half program. tral Y. Parishioners Interrupt Sermons ALBANY. N.Y. (AI'i The "It me to death Ihe Hev. Conail Hart received quite first time, lint it doesn't shake a jolt when patenting liis first me any more. If they don't stop sermon to deaf parishioners. He me. I'm disappointed it would was interrupted and told lo mean I'm a total bore." change the subject. Father Hart, 52. ministers full Now, six years later, the soft- lime to deaf persons in the Al- spokcn Franciscan priest laughs bany Roman Catholic diocese, at the incident, but admits that i regardless their religion. He time hasn't mellowed liis crit-describes his assignment as "a ics. His sermons conveyed by real explaining sign language and lip reading- 'that serving the deaf is a part- arc still inU'iTiipled. lime job fur priests in moM "When you give a sermon to Catholic dioceses, a deaf audience, it has to have. Celebrating the Mass is but lie .said. "They're not one of many service.s he pro- interested in the abstract. If I vhles to some 500 deaf persons, .say somelliiiif; they don't under-'He is on call to aid physicians. ,'iland or lalk about somelhing lawyers, police and hospital1 they're not interested in, personnel in coin- slop me on Ihe spol. Imiinicalinj; wilh the deaf. two young English friends for a camping trip to the West Coast. "We're first going to a Sioux Indian he explained, "then we're going to see a bit of the oi' cow- pokes on a ranch in Wyoming. After that we'll go to Yellow- stone and eventually Wash- ington state." Following a trip down the coast of California, the three will stop off in Las Vegas "to pay for our way home" and end up back in Chicago. Alistair then plans a "holi- day" at the Michigan summer home of Mrs. Barbara Dixon, 314 Nassau street SE. before heading back to school. His only regret on leaving Cedar Rapids was that he had not yet seen a drive-in movie. "I didn't have any wheels, and if you don't have wheels here you might as well not exist." He did have a bicycle, on which he chalked up 280 miles in the weeks he was in Cedar Rapids, but he said he felt this inappropriate at a drive-in. Police Losing Fight Thefts of Art By Kd Blanche LONDON (Al'l "We're con men and kleptomaniacs and right now they're winning hands down." That's how a British security man summed up Ihe speetacu- lev, years. Scaling an treasures has1 been a lucrative business since: thieu's in ancient Egypt pillaged ;lie tombs of the Pharaohs. Bu; in the last three years it has reached epidemic proportions. Investigators believe many of the big-time robberies are car- ried out by highly skilled gangs specifically to sell to rich collec- tors or for ransom to insurance companies. One of the most recent big cases was the theft of two i Rembrandls "Portrait of an Elderly Woman" and "Man Leaning on a Sill" by three i raiders from (lie Taft museum in Cincinnati, Ohio. The gang demanded a ransom and threatened lo de-j stroy the masterpieces if it wasn't paid. They were arrested after one-third of the money had been handed over. The paint-! ings were recovered. Dozens of other works of art have vanished without trace. i Hardly any of the prized! pieces stolen ever come up for! public sale because they're too! well known. A London art expert, com- menting on a theory that some thefts are carried out by con- tract, explained: "There are some kinky characters who feel an almost sexual lust for partic- ular paintings and they'll do just about anything to get! them." j Some police agencies have es- timated that the value of the loot in the lest three years runs; as high as SI billion a year. j But some experts believe that's too conservative becausej some thefts are never reported. Few countries boasting major art treasures, especially West- ern Europe and the United States, have escaped the plun-! derers. Galleries, museums and! private collections have all been- ransacked by gangs with an eye) for beauty and fat profits. j FREE MATCHING WIGLET WITH EVERY WIG BY FASHION TRESS ONE WEEK ONLY! Let Fashion Tress brief you on the natural way to look! "First Lady" wig shown: "Petite Plus" wig at 30.00 Trust Fashion Tress to give you the natural wig way to two beautiful hairstyles. 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