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   Cedar Rapids Gazette (Newspaper) - July 6, 1974, Cedar Rapids, Iowa                                See Eaker Stay Low, Win Late-Model Stock Race The Cedar Kapids Gazfttc: Sat.. July ti. 197-i 9 .jLii liy Al Miller Cli.I. i .M.mmiru l'J72 .N'uva into UK.. fjrvt forciiij; racini; action on Uic fir.-t lap of tin- 2J-lap lalo-inodi-1 .stock car feature Friday al Hawk- rye IJO'.VILS. It was a calculated move by (lie Cedar Rapids chauffeur an estimated 7.50U All- Jowa fairgoers and it paid off Kaker, who .started the feature on the. in- side of tlie second row, con- liimed on lo sel ihe tin- full distance. "1 was hoping 1 could stick down below and that the first row (Fred Horn and lul Sungert would Kakcr said witii a wry smile. "That's the nice thing about starting where I you can try something. But you're al- Verlin Eaker must afraid to try anything when you're in the lead." Eaker stayed with Ihe low groove for the most part and was chased by both Sanger and Curt llansen. That was a battle, also, with the runner- up spot taking a .switch on the llth and 12th tours before Sanger settled down. Sanger tried Kaker both high and low several times, but couldn't quite get the job done and had to settle for .sec- ond place by about five car lengths. "I don'l think 1 could have won by staying Eaker admitted. "1 could run about anywhere, hut the low side worked best for me. "I got a better bite on the inside coming out of the turns running about half throttle." Verlin, who posted his first feature triumph at the Downs since winning the Iowa Chal- lenge Cup a month ago, also said he felt running the third heat (which lie won) proved to uc an "That gave me a good idea of what the track would be like in the he said. llansen, who captured last week's Fair opener, took tiiiru, with HiH Roger Dolan rounding out the top five. Sanger and Horn also claimed heat victories. Horn's win was the night's thriller. Kred and llansen were in a wheel-to-wheel duel for tin: last three laps, with X.wan- y.iger pushing the last two laps in the 10-lapper. It was, in- deed, a blanket finish and the near-capacity crowd let its ap- proval be known. The semi went to Don Hoff- man. Dave Burkliofcr won his second street stock feature in as many weeks. He and Bar- rel! Krewson were the heat Says Each Dolphin Can Make His Own Decision MIAMI (AP) The .Miami Dolphins' representative to the National Football League Play- ers' Association says each play- About 35 members of the Dol- phins and representatives from the NFLPA met here Friday for three hours to discuss the er must decide for strike, whether to participate in the] College All-Star Game. No Force "We are trying to stress indi-j Afterwards, Swift, a vidual choice for each player representative Doug Swift said after Friday's meet- ing. "We can't be striking for freedom and at the same time force the players to do some- thing they may be against." Meanwhile, Ed Garvey, exec- utive director of the NFLPA, said at least 20 veterans of the Super Bowl Champion Dolphins had agreed to picket the Sun- day opening of the squad's training camp at Biscayne Col- lege. line- backer, said it would be against the goals of the players' group if team members were forced to boycott camp or the July 26 All-Star Game in Chicago. But Garvey said that if any Dolphins decide to play in the of Mandich said All-Star game, "they will have to walk through a pretty hefty picket line." Garvey also said the Dolphins will meet Sunday morning to complete plans for picketing at the team's training camp. Rookies and free agents are to Past Russian Runners DURHAM, N.C. (AP) Reg- gie Jones doesn't care whether he's known as the world's fast- Vladimir Panteley swept the race, with Ponomarev record- ing a time of "He lost cst human. But he'd like for his Ponomarev said people to know his name. Jones, angry at being the ''unknown runner" behind Steve Williams, sped to two gold medals in the U.S.-USSR track meet Friday. His efforts weren't enough to keep the Soviets from taking a 90-75 lead in the combined men's and women's competition and a 54-49 lead in the men's events. But Jones and his teammates from the National Collegiate Athletic Association champions at the University of Tennessee kept a depleted U.S. team from being run out of Duke Univer- sity stadium. Jones led Williams in a U.S. sweep of the 100 meters in 10.2 seconds and anchored the 440- through an interpreter. "I think I would have won anyway be- cause I felt great." Other long American faces belonged to pole vaulter Dave Roberts, who failed to -clear any height and recorded no points, and to Qiarlie McGuire. McGuire bided his time in the meters until the last lap was half over. He spurted into the lead but was soon over- taken by Valentin Zotov. "I started my kick loo McGuire said. The Soviets showed their strength in the field events. Alexsey Spiridonov won the hammer with only one throw, a meet record 244-11. Viktor Saneyev then won the triple jump with 54-4. Vladimir Trofi- yard relay team lo a 3fl.3 took the pole vault at ifi-1034. Viktor Voikin set a So- Darwm viet national record with a 67- heave in the shot put. rcport Sunday with veterans scheduled to show up a week later. But at least one veteran play- er said he plans to cross the line, and indicated that others felt the same way. Tight end Jim Mandich said there was nothing in Friday's meeting with NFLPA official: to make him change his mind about ignoring the strike and reporting to training camp. "I'm tired of the business end "Management has treated me very well in my contract nego- tiations and I'm looking for ward to my best year yet. don't want anything to spoil it.' Mandich, a five-year pro who has a shot at a starting slot this season, said he felt that since the Dolphins are world cham pions, they have to set an ex ample for the rest of the league. He said other players also planned to cross picke' lines, but he declined to identi- fy them. Two other players indicated they were upset with some ol the demands of the players' as- sociation, but said they would not make a statement pending further consideration. No Backing Center Jim Langer, who ear- lier this week said that 80 per cent of his teammates want to play against the All-Stars, and inebacker Bob Matheson said the session produced good dis- cussion on both sides. But they added that they weren't yet ready to back either position. Placekicker Garo Yepremian said it appeared as if most ilayers were supporting the strike, and he would go along with whatever the majority de- cided. In a related development, Dolphin Coach Don Shula said n a speech Friday that the layers' demands "seems like someone's telling me how to un my football team." Shula said the list of 90 de- mands by the NFLPA makes lim wonder if either he or the NFL has done anything right. UfODS rOD-UD C ond victory. Fellow Volunteer Bond outkicked Maurice Peo- ples to win the 400 meters in 46.1, and Tom Hill and Charles Foster recorded the only other U.S. sweep in the 110 meter! hurdles. Hill held Foster off to; win in 13.5 seconds. Today, at least. Jones the Russians will know who he! is He said he had read a hchradcr Astros aren't over- story this week quoting a Sovietj The Clinton Pilots would have stocked with RBI men these as saying that Steve saying anything but "Holy and someone else would be if they had blown Fri- for the U.S. ida.v night's Midwest Basebaf LATE MODEL Fealure (25 1. Verlin Faker, Cedar Ranids; 2. Ed Sanqer, Waterloo; 3. Curt Hansen, Dike; 4 Bill Zwanziuer, Wa- "'10; 5 Roger Dolan, Lisbon; 6. Stan, ..er, Relnbeck; 7. Darrell Dake, Cedar! Rapids; 8. Fred Horn, Marion 1st heat Horn; 2. Hansen; 3.1 Zwaiulsjer; 4. Dake 2nd heat 1. Sanger. 2. Stover; 3. Bill McDonough, C.R.; 4. Arlo Becker, Atkins 3rd heat 1. Eaker; 2. Dolan; 3. Red Droste, Waterloo; A. Cal Swanson, Relnbeck Semi 1. Don Hoffman, DCS Moines; 2. Mike Niffenegger, Kalona; 3 Bob Helm, Andalusia, ill.; 4. Ken Walton, C.R. STREET STOCK .'ature: 1. Dave Burkholer; 2. Ken Fenn; 3. Ken DeGood 1st heat: 1. Darrell Krewion; 2. Shirley Derr; 3. Don Sterba 2nd heat: 1. Burkhoferj 2. DeGsod; 3. Fenn Attendance: eslimated. Teieoholo Americans Sloppy, but Win 109-86 PONCE, P. R. (AP) Quick guards, led by Luther Burden paced an often-sloppy Ameri can basketball team to a 109-86 victory over Argentina Friday night in the World Basketbal Championship tournament. The victory was the thirt straight for the U. S. squat which exploded after Argentina had tied the game 8-8 in the early going. The American squad then scored 14 of the next 18 points to pull away. Burden, of Utah, finished the game with 22 points, while John Lucas had 15. In the other game at Ponce, Spain defeated The Phillipines 117-85 to gain a berth in the fi- nal round Sunday. In Group C competition at San Juan, Cuba edged Canada 10-79, while Czechoslovakia de- 'eated Australia 88-84. At Caguas, the Soviet Union advanced in Group A with a 95- !0 victory over Mexico, while Brazil routed the Central Afri- can Republic 95-54. Cuba had to come from be- lind to edge the Canadians. Alejandro Lazaro Ortiz scored 'our crucial points in the last three minutes of play. Canada, looking for its second upset victory of the tourney, ook the lead from the first and leld it until Ortiz went to work vith remaining on the ilock. Wayne Brabender, Spain's Evert plants a kiss on trophy after winning singles title Friday at Wimbledon. if Connors Snead's Lead Up to 4 Reigns at Wimbledon MILWAUKEE lAPi "It's1 Sneed. who has led ever since has been bettered only twice ja good feeling to be leading opening year, four Ed Sneed one more shot off par: fala 66 after three rounds of the a scrambling 71 000 Milwaukee Open Golf Tour-land put together a 54-hole total! brou6ht him trom out ot the nament. of 204, 14 under par on the to fourlh alonc at 209- But Sneed, the pacesetter Tuckaway Country: It was another two strokes WIMBLEDON, England (AP) Jimmy Connors crushed 39- year-old Ken Roscwall 6-1, 6-1, 6-4 in the singles final today and joined fiancee Chris Everl American-born star, was the of- 'ensive star against The Philli- the way and now enjoying onejClub course. of the largest 54-hole leads of Hill, ho played the par five the season on the pro tour, three under despite some not without a challenger going into today's last 18 holes in the chase for a first prize. erratic driving and uncertain putting, had a 68 and was tied for second at 208 with big Bob "I have a number in Zender had a 69 in the back to the group at 211, seven shots off the pace. At that fig- ure were Tommy Aaron, Lee Trevino, Hubert Green, Larry Hinson, Bob Smith and Cesar Sanudo. Wimbledon tennis cham- said dangerous Dave Hill, re-i almost ideal playing conditions, Neitner Sneed. whose only jferrmg to his target score sunny weather with justjt0ur victory came in the Kaiser ithe last round. "The number is the hint of a breeze. J0pen last fall, nor Hill were Sneed's four-stroke advantage i completely enchanted with their play in the third round. pion. Miss Evert won the women's 155 singles title by beating Olgaj_____________ Morozova of Russia G-0, 6-4 Fri- day. The 21-year-old Connors, of Belleville, 111., simply over- whelmed the veteran Aussie j with well-placed serves and' blistering ground strokes. j Connors changed tactics for the championship match. He GRAND ISLAND. N.Y. But Mrs. Brcer wasn't fin- forced Rosewall into a duel Murle Breer's motto when ished. On the 481-yard par five groundstrokes by holding back make a bogey: "Don't give v.ho instead of rushing the net at "P- Don't get down on yourself." the first oportunity, then after! She didn't. And that's why several exchanges he a three-under-par 70 she is eighth, she put her drive down "It was a pretty good score, jail considered." said Sneed, Uvho now has 19 birdies for three rounds. "But I really didn't play very well. I hit my irons kind of shabby." He had five birdies and four bogeys, the last on the final hole after driving behind a tree. "I'm aware of my rush the net. In the second set Connors re- mained at the baseline after his serve, on the theory that Rose- vall's service return was the) Australian's best shot. Rosewall lad little chance to try passing shots, and Connors wore him down with sharply hit ground- trokes. In the final set. Rosewall double faulted to give Connors a break. But the Australian, a strong ientimental favorite here, >roke right back and then held lis serve 2-1 as he bid desper- ately to stave off defeat. Connors saved three break- iflints to hold serve and even he set at 2-2, and then took the the center of the fairway. Her ne said "There's pressure. Of three-iron second shot j course there is. I feel different the front-runner after the first) dropped the ball three feet jthan if I was shooting a bunch round in Ihe 54-hole Nia- gara Frontier Golf Classic, the 19th stop this year on the Ladies Professional Golf Association tour. Mrs. Brcer, a touring pro since 1958 but a non-winner since 1969, played the back nine first Friday at the par-73, River Oaks Golf club course in par 37. Then S'je exploded. from the cup and "I just 73s and was 15 shots back. j Everyone feels pressure. "I've just got to not get too concerned with what the other Pam Barnett, Mrs. Breer saw iguys ,are doin.g then do Joanne Carner and Sharon stuPld myself' Thats er come in with 71s. !what Ive 8ot to rolled it in" for an eagle. In the clubhouse with a three] stroke lead over playing partner She reeled off four slraiehti a''d''a Miss Barnett and Carolyn] Kertzman were in with par 73s. j Behind them, with 74s, were Jo Ann Prentice, the tour's leading money-winner with and Debbie Austin, Mary Homer, rom' Leaders Gricr Jones Lee Trevino Cesar Sanudo "I unifny Aaron ead by breaking service as losewall again had problems Vith his first service. later. "I hit a good shot, but that's what happens." On the sixth, a la-fool putt was good for a birdie. On the seventh, her seven-iron tee shot hit the green right of the pin. dribbled left and Leaders ___ Snead Curtis Sifford I Dale Douglass bob stanton Toledo Almost Saves C. "Thai said. mad." he I Ic-aguc game to !Rapids Astros. the Cedar The Soviets had a lot of com-i Their first baseman. Manny pany in their ignorance until this spring. Jones, a 20-year-old Toledo, almost gave it away by dropping the simplest, kind of freshman from Saginaw. fly, but Clinton held on for a burst on the scone when he 13-2 victory lo even the Iwo- beal Williams in the NCAA series, yard championship earlier tliisj hit nlc year. Friday was his first inter- national competition. don'l want lo be Ihe world'.'', fastest human." he said. "Then everyone will be gunning for inc." .1 o n P s ebullience w a s matched by disappointment on I he part Ihrce Americans. Tom Hycrs. an Ohio .State freshman, led Ihe 1500 mclers until Ilic final turn. Then, ac- cording I" Bycrs, IIP was bumped by a Russian runner and slumbli'd off Ihe (rack. Meet officials and Ihe Sovicl runners disagreed and Ihe final ruling was thai Byi'i's tripped on tin' curb and Ilipn bumped the Hii.ssian. With B.VITS slumbliug, llu.v Wiscimsin for four days, play- ing two games each at Applc- and Wisconsin Rapids. Next home stand is Wednes- day and Thursday against Dii- buquc's Packers. days, pinch-hittcr Alex Taveras grounded out to end the threat. Tom.Twcllman was the best of Ihe Astro hitters, getting a double and two singles, but none of them figured in Ihe scoring. Acting manager Bob Cluck Ihought Tom should have had a perfect, night, as lie argued heatedly with umpire Dick Rim- chy when the latter called Tom out on a close play al first in sailing along with a :i-l lead and retired Ihe first Iwo C.R. batters in the eighth. Then Cat I'orlley cd a brief pop-up lhal Tole- do called for almost where lie stood. Toledo somehow let IMP ball squirt out of his glove, h'rrti Minis and liaf Tails quickly rallied singles for one run, and (ircg Kiihl, who replaced him, walked I'asUir on four pilches tn load Hie bases. The olhcr Astro run came in the fourlh. Porllcy singled. With one mil, ho was forced at second by Tails. Then Talis stole sec- ond and look third on the over- Ihrow. lip ccorcd on single. Alan Newsomc led the win- ners with three singles, hut his hitting didn't, figure in Iheir scoring, eilher. I'Yed Auslin tripled in a run in the fourlh and scored on (ilynn's Texas-league single. The first Clinlou run, in Ihe sec- Drake, fleet outfielder from Lompoc, Calif., who was Hous- ton's No. 1 draft choice last month, says he will pass up football at UCLA. This mixing of pro and amateur sports now is legal under a new NCAA rule, but he thinks he already has lost too much football practice time. He wanls lo concentrate on baseball, his first love No- body has succeeded in throwing a baseball into Ihe hole on the Henry's Hamburger target, so there will be a prize offered next Wednesday when the Aslros return. After each game. is added the pot. Clinton (.1) Ccd.ir R.wicls ah h rbl .in h rbi Wolfe.ft ...100 Rinw.cf .3 00 Mlchaeis.cf .5 i o .t i o N'cwsomt'.lf ..430 AAims.lf .1 1 0 VasqiJMJb .100 Tatis.svrf .t 1 l Vtfjn.c ,.i o PcreMb .1 1 t .-110 -1 l TilvcMs.ss 1 0 0 4 0 1 Twcllm.irUb -t .1 0 Flrc.wn.c 4 0 0 It 0 0 .100 I 0 0 [dropped into the cup for a hole- Each player held his next twoim'onc- ervices and Connors led 5-4 i was hor llllh carccr aee nd served for the match. her sccond in LPGA Connors took a 15-0 lead when Rosewall hit a volley out. The American ran it to 40-0 when he scored on a forehand volley and Rosewall missed a baseline shot. Roscwall then saved malchjSkS.' point twice by scoring on Karolyn Kertzman Debbie Austin Mary Homer Sandra Post Jo Ann Prentice Kathy Welsch Denise Bebcrnes Jane Bialock JKathv comeim 35-39-74 38-37-75 37-38-75 Charles Goody Jon Lister Chi Chi Rodriguez Don Iverson Billy Ziobro Bruce Fleisher Tom Shaw Bert Yancey Mac McLendon 73-72-68-213 S backhand passing shots R'loid5 Connors won the championship' with a second serve that Rose- ALWAYS EN FIRST PLACE 5 .5-15------ put into the net. illlrnrlcjT The I Decalur Quad C match lasted only 50 minutes. Roscwall opened the match by holding bis service despite two double faults. But Connors! Qu3d then won the next six games in] the first set, to win the set, and the first four games in the sec- ond set before Roscwall finally; broke Connors' service. Rut with the center-court crowd shouting, "Come on give it a go." Connors broke' back for a ;Vl lead and then held his serve to win Ihe set N- when Rosewall put a vollev into the net. i1 Sunday's Games Chicago at Detroit, p.m. Kar.sas City at Boston, 2, I p m Minnesota at Milwaukee, I'.m Baltimore at Oakland, 4-30 p m Cleveland at California, 5 p.m. New Ycrk a! i exas, V p.m. NATIONAL LEAGUE East AMERICAN LEAGUE Fr i Dieno siiifili1 and nil infield out. V: Kevin j n o i o o l  San Dioqo at Philadelphia, p. Siin r-rniicisro at New Ynrk, 2 ii. Pittsburgh at Houston, n.m. at New incinnati ea I Ihony of Siinln Monica, Calif..! Iho the women's doubles al Wimhle- don before being Friday. J Scliiillau and Anthony wi'i-ei defeated by Ihe Australian Ian clem of Helen (Jourlay aadj Karen ft-lt, li 2. i DID YOU KNOW THAT: Wriglcy Field, in Chicago is the oldest I National League ballpark still in use. First opened in 1914, as home of tho Chicago I l Whales in Ihe Federal League; Ihe park became the home of Ihe Cubs in 1916. The first National League game in Wrigley Field was played on April 20, 1916. Wrigloy Field has since hosled over National League games, through the 1973 season.   

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