Cedar Rapids Gazette, July 6, 1974, Page 8

Publication: Cedar Rapids Gazette July 6, 1974

Cedar Rapids Gazette (Newspaper) - July 6, 1974, Cedar Rapids, Iowa 8 The Cedar Rapids Gazette: Sat., July 6, 1974 Stop-and-Frisk Zebra Hunt Hit by NAACP NEW ORLEANS (AF) - The stop-and-frisk searches of black men during San Francisco’s Zebra manhunt was condemned by the National Assn. for the Advancement of Colored People convention as dangerous overreaction by police. Undertaken in a drive to end terrorist-style murders of whites by blacks, the searches later were ruled unconstitutional by a federal judge. “The lawless acts of the police created such an intolerable condition of tension and apprehension in the black community that it could have led to an explosion of enormous dimensions,” a resolution said. Zebra was a police code name for a special radio frequency used in coordinating police action whenever a new sidewalk shooting occurred. “Knew Illegality” In motiveless attacks spread from last December to April, 12 whites were slain and eight maimed. Police said that in each instance the attacker was identified as a black man. Nathaniel Colley, a Sacramen- Military To Call Signals For Ethiopia ADDIS ABABA (AP) - Emperor Haile Selassie has agreed to military supervision of the Ethiopian government and to ac-eelerationof constitutional changes to bring democratic reforms. In an hour-long showdown with the 81-year-old monarch at his Jubilee palace Wednesday, a committee of military reformers who have been calling the turn in Addis Ababa for five; days obtained his assent to direct military intervention in civilian affairs- to lawyer who won the U. S. district court injunction against the stop-and-frisk, said authorities knew such searches were illegal when they were ordered. “It was really a search for evidence, they were looking for a .38 pistol,” he told a convention workshop. “They knew this was an unconstitutional search.” In another resolution, the NAACP demanded a moratorium on mental tests where most blacks score lower than whites. Standardized tests are misleading when they have not been corrected for cultural bias, the delegates said. “Racism Flames” Such tests result in “a disproportionately large number of black students being misplaced in special education classes and denied admissions to higher education opportunities,” the resolution added. It urged use of “all administrative and legal remedies to prevent vioaltion of students’ constitutional rights through misuse of tests.” President Nixon's administration again drew fire for “continuing to fan the flames of racism with code words such as 'neighborhood schools’ and ‘forced busing.’ ” A resolution said the continued use of such words has “given encouragement to the proponents of segregated schools to the extent that they have become more blatant in their discriminatory practices and more recalcitrant in their actions.” Dog Carf —UPI Telephoto U. S.-Soviet Team To Study Early Migrants NEW YORK (UPI)-A team of Soviet and American scientists, happily removed from the day-to-day fluctuations of political detente, has left New York for Alaska to study mutual ancestors — the ancient inhabitants of the Aleutian islands. A group of five Russian archaeologists and anthropologists plan to spend a month with their U.S. colleagues in joint research on Umnak island, the site where thousands of years ago Siberian settlers first penetrated what is now tile American continent. Although scholarly collaboration between Soviets ;md Americans dates back through the years of the cold war, the current project is believed to be the first time Soviets have ever been permitted to come to the U.S. for original research. Two Sides “We know where the migrants went to but not where they j came from. They (the Russians) now where they came from but not where they went to,” said I University of Connecticut pro- and what stage of development they reached.” “We are interested in all aspects-! align age, dc mogr a phy, everything,” the Soviet professor added. Asked if the archaeological NE project had significance for U.S.-Soviet cooperation in other fields, Okladnikov, a round-faced, middle-aged man with twinkling blue eyes answered —Services— (Continued from Page 3.) ave. NW. Neal B. Gail. S.S. (J:30. Serv. 10:30. Eve. 7:30. First Pentecostal Church — ROO Center Point rd. NE. James O McCoy. SS. 930. Serv. 10:30. Tues., Thurs. Eve. 7. Foursquare Gospel OOO 1st ave. SW. Lee Griffis. S S. 9:30. Communion and serv. mdn-Eve. 7 Wed. eve. 7:30. Phil Starr. Eli. 1:30 p.m. Grace Brethren—2905 D ave. Gilbert Gilman. SS. 9:30. Serv. 10:30. Eve. 7. Wed. 7:15. Interdenominational —3rd st. and 5th ave. SW. A. J. Stokes. SS 9:45. Serv. 10:45. Eve. 6:30. Islamic (’enter—2999 1st ave. SW. SS., serv. 11:30; prayer, enthusiastically: “I believe it is ^Meth-Wiik Chapel — 1224 a very big — a very effective — 13th st. NW. Donald Artman. beginning for contact between I Serv. 9. our countries. Sawhill Pushes State Overhau Of Utility Rates New Apostolic Church—2930 Wilson ave. SW. S S. 8:45. Serv. at West Amana, IO. Wed. eve. 8 p.m. N e w Jerusalem Church of God in Christ—631 9th ave. SE. In. Bassett. SS. 10:30. Serv. 12. j Eve. 8. Peoples Unitarian — 600 3rd ave. SE. Walter E. Kellison. .....    _    .    ....    „    ,    .Conversation, ll. VAIL,    Colo.    (AP) — Federal    salvation Army — 1123 3rd Energy Administrator John st. SE. Eugene Adney. SS. Sawhill called Wednesday for a Seir' J ^    ,    AO    , .    ,    ,    . . ' . *,•. Scventh-I)ay Adventist—42nd major overhaul of state utility st .md EdgewJood rd. NEt strafes to provide revenues to ex- fried Roeske. S.S. 9:30. Serv. ll. pand electrical facilities.    Seventh Day Church of God C u n , U .U f »    ♦ * Ail -- (Meridan) a336 Prairie dr. Sawhill told the Interstate Oil NE w T McMickin. School Compact Commission he sent Sat. IO. Serv. 11:30. Temple Judah — 3221 Lind- Summer serv. Fri. fesse.- William Laughlin, who is lem'rs Tllcsda.v 10 the 50 «°ver;isav lane SE directing the archaeological dig "°rs    «    maJor, overha“!    “J. tao. .    .    rn ruin crriir*fnmc a en u/nnrn    it-:,., n__ Unity Center—1015 2nd ave. SE. Mabel K. Swanson. Serv. ll. Barney Butler, a graduate student in veterinary medicine at Michigan State university East Lansing, fashioned this special cart for his dog, Clancey, out of an old golf cart and a milk carton. in FEA: Lead-Free Gas Prices Ic Father Raps Coast Guard's Handling of Shark Rescue gents the loss to the Horne family, This case, as does every search and rescue case, points up the need for improved boating safety and adequate surviv- HOUSTON (AP) - Edward Horne said he radioed the I al equipment. Had the Princess Horne, who spent 13 hours in j exact position of the cruiser Dianne (Horne’s boat) carried a WASHINGTON (AP) - Leadfree gasoline, required at large service stations starting this D ,.K shark-infested waters with his about 10:30 p.m. and he saw a    or    llferaft    [°r    dPcn ''a \Jver Regular wife and five children, has cri- helicopter make two passes in va>aS°- they might have found ticized the way the U. S. coast'the distance during the night j ten}P°rary protection need-guard handled their rescue. 'but that the air search was not ed in ttus emer8ency* Horne’s 43-foot cabin cruiser, resumed until three hours after' month may ^ saH at no mnrr PrinCeSS D,a'U’e' S3”k a dayl‘ght    .    AlaDamaLoOKS month, may be sold at no more Sf0rm Monday night off Carra- A coast guard spokesman in — nil ..i The armed forces were given than one cent per gallon higher belle, Fla. Edward, jr., 3. and New Orleans said a rescue cut- rOT DmCKSmith virtual veto authority over the than the dealer’s regular gaso- Billy, IO, died while en route by ter left Point Lobos 45 minutes onNTGOMirRv ai ppd cabinet, power they had “as- linGi at \east temporarily, the I helicopter to Tyndall Air Force after receiving the distress sig- *    ‘    \    t/ sumed anyway, but getting the j Federal Energy’ Administration Base in Panama City, Fla.    nab He said a    plane    and a    J" 1.    df?J°‘    “c    J1:l emperor to agree makes it legit-! (FEA) ruJed Wednesday.    Billy    had    an arm and a leg helicopter left that night and    ^    Q imate,’ one diplomat said.    The    pea originally proposed mangled by a shark. Edward, searched throughout the night, ij    f\ a . The emperor called a special, t0 allow sales of lead-free gaso-jr., apparently died of shock The coast guard said addi- m written examination recession of parliament to enact jjne af the price of premium and exposure.    tional units were    called    the fob    Qulred- constitutional changes making grade.    Horne, who lives here, said lowing morning and continued The salary ranges from $6,019 him virtually a figurehead,!    Regular gasoline    currently    Thursday that the coast    guard    to search    a 4.300-square-miIc    to $7,878 a year. Experience    and making the prime minister re-    averages about 55.1    cents per    should    have had    oxygen    in the    area that covered a 35-mile ra-    an eighth-grade education    are sponsible to parliament and gallon, the FEA said, so lead- rescue helicopter, and accused dius from the point where the the only requirements, ending government support for free gasoline can be sold at the coast guard of failing to distress signal was sent.    The state says it needs a the Ethiopian Orthodox Coptic the pump for an average of resume the air search until    Official    Policy    blacksmith to forge, sharpen Christian Church.    56.1 cents per gallon, some 2.6 three hours after daylight Tues-    ,    *    and temper tools and pieces of Endalkachew Makonnen con-iCents less than the average day    Concerning the lack of ox-1 tinued as prime minister despite! price of premium.    “Criminal”    :ygen’ an the military reformers’ anger The FEA noted, however, that;    statement said: with his lack of progress in; gasoline prices may vary con- “Tm very bitter because it “Official coast guard policy is making the changes he prom-1 siderably from these averages I " as criminal not to have ox-not to carry paramedics or hos-ised when he took office four; jn different parts of the nation. I ygen/’ Horne said. “Tex (Ed-pi tai corpsmen on routine months ago. It was this delay    An FEA spokesman    said the    ward,    jr.) was    alive    when    search and    rescue missions in that resulted in the military in-    one-cent add-on for    unleaded    picked    up and I    can’t say he    as much as    90 percent of search    Srand mufti of Jerusalem who tervention last weekend, when gasoline would take effect im- would have lived had he had ox-'and rescue missions occur with- severa* ^rah revolts against the reformers sent troops into mediately and remain in effect ygen,” Horne said. “But we in 30 minutes flying time from J*1* ^r^S^Thma^[late in I^es' the streets of Addis Ababa and at least through this month. were told on the rescue fishing the shore where medical facili- Jine’ Thursday, took control of the country.    But    FEA said it was still ana- boat it was imperative that he ties are maintained. The reformers’ goal now, and lyzing the cost of lead-free gaso-Shave oxygen.”    “The    coast guard    deeply re line and may revise the autho-i- of rate structures also would discourage energy waste. “States bear the major re-1 sponsibility to regulate utility, rates, and major action is needed here to meet the financial crisis that utility companies are j in today,” he said. “At all levels of government,!    ‘ Y1'    ,    , „       ,hat    |hp agriculture department had on Umnak island. Laughlin’s words were echoed by Dr. Alexei Okladnikov, director of the Institute bf History. Philosophy and Philology, ocated in Novosibirsk, Siberia, and leader of the Soviet scientific team. “You know it from your side; we from ours — together we | we must understand mc, M«v ,    ,    ...    .    .    ,    ,, can accomplish something fan- era of low-cost, abundant ener-good news dnes ay ,or gy is over, and adjust to the' Predict Coffee Supply To Jump WASHINGTON (AP) - The tastic,” Okladnikov said in an interview before the Russians departed for Anchorage. Village Located The research project is sponsored jointly by the Soviet Academy of Sciences and the U.S. National Academy of Sciences and funded by the University of Connecticut, the National Science Foundation and the New York-based Wenner-Gren Foundation for Anthropological Research. Last May, Laughlin, chairman of the University of Connecticut’s laboratory of biologi- drinkers and other the crop in Brazil countries will be cal anthropology, traveled to, I ,    ■ ... ■■■ , Siberia for a conference on the continued vitality, the letter realities of growing scarcity. ,    ,    ,    ... Sawhill released copies of the '"uch la,rger th,ls year- mean,ng letter in which he outlined for 'he wor,.ld fW'y for .exP°rt wl" the governors the results of a P° UP ab°ut 35 percent. June 19 Washington conference Total world production for the with utility executives, commis- 1974-75 season is estimated at sioners and consultants.    80.3 million bags, up sharply The letter said the electric from last year’s drop of 64.3 utility industries in most states million, the department’s are having great difficulty in f o r e i g n agricultural service raising capital and in paying said. costs for fuels and materials in But USDA officials are cau-meeting growing environmental tious about predicting lower cof-demands.    f e e prices for consumers, “And they are generally frus- whether in retail stores by the trated by an outmoded rate can or in lunch counters by the structure that threatens their cup. Bering land bridge that once connected Asia and North Amer- Fare Boost WASHINGTON (AP) - Air said. Sawhill said 31 states have existing provisions for automa-1 fares*“’n routes ' over the north “We’ve already located a vil-|tlc pass-throughs for increased and centraj pacific will go up 4 lage site on the island that dates ^L,el costs by utility firms, but Dercerd effective Julv 15 — o-aa    -7PAA    no state has an automatic pass- v    J lea back to between 8700 and 7800 B.C.,” Laughlin said. He said through for increased operating this was about the same time costs-the Bering land bridge finally split apart. “Big Beginning” “First we wish to know how m me jeu.* ui u.\-    a    ili.- ithe Aleuts came to what is now lh mc    UA    equipment    used    on    state vehi-.. official coast guard    j , d d onujDmfM1*    the New 'Vorld' Okladnikov cits and road equipment.    sajd    .<Second we wish to how they managed to settle j Grand Mufti Death    there    — what kind of culture j BEIRUT. Lebanon (AP)-Haj Amin el Husseini, 77, former TK AokstrE*) c OUM OL) ^5--- 30 YEARS AGO — Berlin announced that Marshal Earl von Rundstedt, commander of German forces in the west, had been replaced by Marshal Guenther von Kluge. when they overthrew Makon-nen’s predecessor in February, is to end the power of the feudal clique of landholding nobles and aristocrats and their allies in the church. Drive Safely rized price “in either direction, depending on the results.” Meanwhile, FEA Administrator John Sawhill estimated that Venezuela’s new price increase The emperor agreed to re-; on crude oil would raise gaso-lease of political prisoners ar- line prices in the U.S. less than rested by previous regimes, and one cent per gallon on the aver-amnesty for exiled foes of those age with geographic variations, regimes. Scores of persons were believed affected. Egyptians Aiming To Build Own Warplanes CAIRO (AP) - Egypt, claiming success in modifying its So-vict-built jets, now hopes to manufacture its own warplanes, the air force commander. Hosni Mobarak. says. In an interview with the official Middle East News Agency. Mobarak said. “President Sadat instructed us to make the necessary studies.” He gave no further details. Mobarak said Egypt introduced several modifications to its planes prior to the October war to increase their maneuvering capabilities. “We have increased the armament of the planes and managed to increase the range of the bombers.” he said. SPECIAL- OF-THE-WEEK! 11,500 BTU AIR CONDITIONER • no VOLT • QUICK MOUNT IO YEARS AGO — Two American special forces men and an Australian army adviser were killed in what other Americans described as a magnificent defense of a central highland special forces camp under heavy Communist-Viet (king attack r \ ZZT\ 'tiyar/uHi aui'ayi J i im*-Only* This is neither an offer to sell nor a solicitation of an offer to buy. These securities are offered by Prospectus only to bona fide residents of Iowa who purchase for investment and not for resale. MorAmerica Financial Corporation 6-1/2% 7-1/2% ONE YEAR THRIFT CERTIFICATES Interest Payable June 30 and December 31 THREE YEAR THRIFT CERTIFICATES Interest Payable June 30 and December 31 8-1/2% SUBORDINATED DEBENTURES DUE JUNE 30, 1984 Interest Payable May 31 and November 30 Copies of the Prospectuses covering the Thrift Certificates and/or the Subordinated Debentures may be obtained from the undersigned as licensed dealer in the securities. The Morris Plan Securities Company IOO American Building Cedar Rapids, Iowa 52401 Oijtr Tv? Color)’or (ui i( SATISFACTION GUARANTEED • Ail ages: Babies, children and adults • One sitting per subject Additional subjects—Groups or individuals in same family —$1.00 per subject No proofs—Choose from finished professional portraits (poses—our selection) You may select additional portraits offered at low prices Only : W NO HANDLING CHARGE Photographer on duty Daily IO a rn 8 p m. Sun loam 6pin KMART WEST ONLY 2727 16th AVE. S.W. rn ;

  • A. J. Stokes
  • Alexei Okladnikov
  • Barney Butler
  • Donald Artman
  • Edward Horne
  • Endalkachew Makonnen
  • Eugene Adney
  • Gilbert Gilman
  • Haile Selassie
  • Haj Amin El Husseini
  • James O Mccoy
  • John Sawhill
  • Lee Griffis
  • Mabel K. Swanson
  • Marshal Earl Von Rundstedt
  • Marshal Guenther Von Kluge
  • Nathaniel Colley
  • Neal B. Gail
  • Phil Starr
  • Princess Horne
  • Walter E. Kellison
  • William Laughlin

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Publication: Cedar Rapids Gazette

Location: Cedar Rapids, Iowa

Issue Date: July 6, 1974

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