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Cedar Rapids Gazette: Wednesday, July 3, 1974 - Page 7

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   Cedar Rapids Gazette (Newspaper) - July 3, 1974, Cedar Rapids, Iowa                                Hoofbeats on The Cedar Kapids (iazetlr: Wed.. July :t. 1971 7 Aid to cattlemen ill-advised' From the Wall Street Journal An editorial Qt'K I1KAUTI--K1.T empathies g., lu tin- nation's Inestock feeders and ranchers, who lost more than >1 billion since beef anil hog prices broke last fall. Our regrets do not extend to having !hv ,TS bail Hie buys uul uf their financ-ial difficulties, however, even though Ibey are urulerstaiidably arguing that government get them in this fix it has an obligation to get them nut. The simple answer to the abmc is thai the government didn't force In do anything against Ins will, but simply eausecl general niiifusiun in the industry last year by beef prices. WheneuT the government suspends the law of supply and demand in an in- dustry, the industry has to make economic judgments without benefit of price signal. Operating in the blind, and assuming the public would continue to increase its consumption of meat even at sharply higher prices, the luestock feeders bid the prices nf feeder cattle and hogs inln the stratosphere. They were wrong. They now want the government In ball them out with loan guarantees, and the senate has whipped up an emergency program t" that effect. There are at least two good reasons why such a program should not be enacted. One is that credit guarantees further cloud the signals u[ the market, mi the margin encouraging investment in feedlol operations when at the moment there is obviously ovcrsupply. Secondly, it would be a dangerously- bad precedent. Every sector of the economy can now put together a ease that it has been harmed by government in- terference in the marketplace, and we would be the first to agree. But can the government guarantee everyone's credit? The other hot idea the livestock people In defense of affirmative action have been pushing is to reimpose quotas on meal imports. "There is simply no justification for permitting unlimited meat imports into our nation today." says Iowa's Sen Richard Clark ill urging same Without realizing how foolish it sounds, the senator also says "the administration can do more b encourage beef exports. Specifically, this country can accelerate negotiations with Canada that will lead to a lifting of the Canadian ban on beef im- ports." In other words, all those foreigners should stop sending us beef and we have to talk them into buying ours. It is unfortunate that S. trading partners have been restricting meat im ports, giving one excuse or another. The' real reason is that just as there are now hoofbeats on Capitol Hill, livestock interests the world over have been stam- peding their respective governments into protectionist, beggar-thy-neigh bin- policies. The price slump, after all. has been worldwide. How nice it would be if the United States were in a position to express out- rage at these practices. But the I'nited States itself is the culprit. We're the main consumers of beef in the world; the world price rises and falls chiefly as a result of supply and demand here. Dur- ing the last big price slump in livestock, congress passed the meat import quota act of 1964, signaling the livestock producers abroad that there was only limited access to the biggest market. When supplies lightened and quotas were lifted in June, 1972, the U. S. government thereby invited producers abroad to gear up again for this market. Senator Clark- Opinion Page Ideas Judgments Views Insights Comrrtents 'Valuable, short-term tool' By Tom Wicker A STUDY such as that just being published by the Carnegie Com- mission on Higher Education appears to supporl Ihe anger of many Americans at what the government calls "affirmative action" and they denounce as "reverse discrimination." That anger is still misplaced, if understandable; il is rather like being angry at a painful treatment rather than at the wound or illness that made it necessary. The new study was compiled by Dr. Richard A. Lester of Princeton as an offshoot of the Carnegie Commission's massive inquiry into higher education. It concludes that "affirmative action" by colleges and universities to hire blacks and women is lowering academic stand- ards, elevating unqualified persons beyond their abilities, and discriminat- ing against white men of higher qualification. Lester wants a different emphasis on, not an end to, "affirmative action." News accounts of his study say he ad- vocates less stress on hiring available minority group members, and more on increasing Ihe supply of well qualified black and female academics which means more black and women students in the universities and professional schools. Unfortunately, that goal, sensible as it is. runs straight into strong opposition to a different kind of "reverse discrimina- tion" preferences for blacks and women in higher education admission policies. The Defunis case, taken to the supreme court by a white student refused admission to the University of Washing- ton law school because of its "affirmative action" policies, did much to focus that opposition. Sn Lester's recommendation only shifts the problem from hiring policy to admissions policy, without really solving either. Somewhat similarly, he wrote that "affirmative action" to hire a suf- ficient number of blacks and women was more applicable to "typists, bricklayers or punch press operators" matt "rhnosing a medieval historian Hut "affirmative action" is no! really welcome at any employment level as witness Ihe fact that on the same day Lester's study was publicized, so was Ihe aclion of a group of New Ytirkcrs of llnllnii descent, whn were forming or- ganisations to fight "reverse discrimination" against themselves. They believed blacks and Puerto Hlcans, in particular, were being fnvored by special programs anil job preferences on a much broader scale than in faculty hiring. No one likes to be, or should be, discriminaled against. As Ihese Americans of Italian descent see It, mid no donbi with reason, they are legiti- mately protecting their own IntoruHlH. Academics disturbed by "affirmative aclion" are doing Ihe same, as well as trying to uphold academic standards if standards are, as Lester believes, being undermined. But the need for "affirmative action" arose only because some groups primarily white males for years were greatly advantaged at the expense of others. Colleges and universities, in par- ticular, having for so long discriminated against women in their admissions policies, having excluded blacks by racial segregation and by merit systems oriented to the white middle class, are in poor position now to decry the shortage of qualified blacks and women. Nor is there much evidence to suggest that discriminatory policies, either in univer- sities or elsewhere, would have changed sufficiently without the pressures of "af- firmative action." The fact is that there is no way to redress a deep-seated grievance without shaking and disarranging things as they are, and disadvantaging some who would otherwise have been preferred. This causes understandable anger and resentment and raises the cry that two wrongs don't make a right; but neither does ending a discriminatory practice in Way with words name only, without some effort to recover what has been lost by those discriminated against. The major problems caused by "affirm- ative moreover, are temporary. Some academic authorities believe, for example, that the number of blacks and other minorities in medical schools lias been sufficiently increased so that preferential admissions policies on their behalf are nc longer needed. This reflects the fact that undergraduate colleges not least because of "affirmative action" pressures are turning out more and more minority graduates who can com- pete equally for places in professional schools. But if "affirmative action" is neces- sary and valuable as a short-term in- strument of redressing a grievance, it is still preference by race and sex, and such preferences are not finally compatible with democratic society. That is why it is all (he more necessary lo speed the day when all Americans can compete for education and jobs on an equal basis of merit, without preference and without discrimination. Now York Times Service 'Should of must go By Theodore M. Bernstein WE'VE HAD enough of of. What bothers Mrs. S. U. E. of Warring- ton. Pa., is the use of would of instead of would hove. When people speak, the contraction would've often sounds like would of, so yon can't blame some school kiiis fin writing it that Hut if teachers doing their job properly, that first lime should be the last time. Hadn't of is something diffcrenl hove is not good English iv bi'icin with When lo use that. There is a tendency .liiiong many newspaper copy editors to eliminate the conjunction that almost every lime II appears. Unfortunately, it is not possible to lay down any rules on when II should be used and when It may be omitted. In most Instances its inclusion or exclusion is a mutter of Idiom Hint Is, how the sentence sounds to one whose native tongue is English. In general yon cannot go wrong if you include il. Mrs. (lordon A. Iloyer of Shreveport, La., raises the question, which has been discussed here before. She cites a sentence that was edited thus: "My present impression is the statement Is correct." It Is not wrong, but 11 fhol would Improve the sound of II. Beyond .simple sentences of Hint sort Iwo guide's may be laid down. One is lo use that when a time element intervenes between the verb and the clause. For in- stance: "The coach said today his team was in A-I condition." Aside from the sound of it, which is a little, though nut importantly, awkward, the sentence is susceptible to ambiguity: Does the today refer to the soid or to Ihe team's condi- tion? The other guide concerns a sentence in which the verb of the clause is long delayed .so that it is not quickly clear that a clause is present at all. Example: "The prosecutor disclosed a document per- taining to the brokerage company swindle was a forgery." A that after disclosed would definitely make the sen- tence easier to read. Word oddih'es. Kirs! it was Honiburg steak, which referred lo broiled ground meat. Then the popular food became hamburger, which name survived World wur 1 efforts to make II Salisbury steak. And then, strangely enough, the burger part became a suffix indicating chopped meat, and, lo, we had cheeseburgers, turkeyburgers and chickenburgers. Probably some of Ihe coiners of these words dill not realixe that hamburger was related lo the (iftfrnim city of Hamburg and thought it had something to do with ham; therefore, If hamburgers, why not chickonburgars? Klrsl thing you know hot dogs will be known as frankburgers. Radio The price freeze last not only con- fused the domestic il i -un- founded the foreign producers. How can we now blame them for waitlnu rciir; from the selfish and absurd stop-anil-u'o policies of the I'. S. nnieiil Knoiigh is enough. The domestic luc- stock people, who are big Inns, should recognise thai government "assistance" is an illusion, that the inevitable effect of loan guarantees or import quotas is simply a deepening of the curves in the beef cycle. With no government interference at all. there would still he ups and downs in the industry. But it would take one of nature's worst catastrophes to trigger a bourn and bust cycle of the kind the government fashioned these past few- years. Instead of caving in to the livestock lobby and starting the cycle again, the government should emphatically renounce these assistance schemes. If it does so with enough conviction, il might be in a position to persuade our wary trade partners that we can be trusted. They'd then have a better chance of resisting the pleas of their livestock interests and the nontariff barriers In trade can be negotiated away. Whether the cowboys believe it or not, the quickest way to gel their industry back to health is to get themselves and their horses back on the range, or at least out of Washington, D. OVER 2000 STORE ALL STORES OPEN THURSDAY, JULY 4TH! versatile Battery Or AC Operation! OUTSTANDING FEATURE Unique World Time Chart On Hinged Cover Pulls Up For Ready Reterence! Folds Down For Travel. Removes Easily! AUTO CASSETTE PLAYER WITH FM STEREO RADIO Reg 119.95 SAVE REALISTIC" AM-FM 4-CHANNEL STEREO RECEIVER SAVE 1110 enhanced stereo1 Tape inputs and outputs SoO valui' v.Mlnni cnnmot BIG BARGAIN1 31-4009 REALISTIC' AUTO WEATHERADIO Player starts when cassette is loaded, shuts off and ejects tape automatically at end of play. 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