Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Share Page

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Cedar Rapids Gazette (Newspaper) - June 23, 1974, Cedar Rapids, Iowa                                HIGH PRIORITY ARCHEOLOGY Threatens History (In Section B) ALUOWA OPENS FRIDAY Schedules, Stories, Pictures 'In Soction E) Section A Weather- Mostly sunny toihn, highs around 70. Fair tonight, IOHS in the low- Oils. CITY FINAL 35 CENTS CK1MK HAI'IDS, IOWA, SI.'NDAY, Jl.'.XK 1074 ASS'jriATKl) PHKSS, XKW YORK TIMKS U.S. Denies Pentagon Chief Opposed Aid to Israel WASHINGTON (AP) Alle- gations that Secretary of State WASHINGTON (AP) Secre- tary of Defense Schlesinger re- sisted sending planes and tanks badly needed by Israel in the early (lays of the 1973 Middle East war, according to a new bi- ography of Henry Kissinger. contained in writ- ten by CBS correspondents Mar- vin and Bernard Kalb. An ex- cerpt was printed in the .New York Times Sunday magazine. The book, which will be pub- lished in full by Little Brown maintains Both Kissinger and Kissinger made secret nuclear Saturday denied the rermrls i, c arrangements with .Soviet lead- -i 11 e Pr WaS rcpcated crs in 1972 are "totally without Ujef .jndI ]lis lo, Wil l Prcsidcnt merit or any foundation whatso-i'- V....'" Nixon that the the state departmen Israel was reeling from th Arab attack, hoping to avoi said Saturday. "There arc no secret arrange menls of any Robert An derson, the department spokes man, told newsmen in disputing reports suggesting the Russians were allowed to build more missile launchers than congress had been led to believe was per missible under the U.S.-Soviei accord. "Reliable" Senator Jackson F critic of Ihe administration's ne- gotiating strategy, had support- ed the allegations as being "re- liable and creditable." Accord- ing to one account, the 950 sea- based missiles allowed the Sovi- et Union were raised to while the U.S. total was lowerec from 710 to 656. Following a meeting with the senate foreign relations commit- tee Friday, Kissinger was askec about Jackson's comment and said "that view must be based on a misapprehension of the ne- gotiations by some of the wit- nesses." Senate Majority Leader Mans- field told reporters Saturday he had been satisfied with Kis- singer's explanation in the closed-door committee meeting. Meanwhile, Rep. Wiley May lie (R-Iowa) Saturday called for new agreements with the Russians to limit multiple warheads and reduce the over-all arms expendi- tures by thc U.S. and Russia. Mayne, speaking at the Veter- ans of Foreign Wars state con- vention, said the Soviets are making much faster progress than expected in weapons and technology not covered by the 1072 ABM treaty and interim agreements. "Unless they can be persuad- ed not to exploit their full poten- tial, we arc headed for a costly arms said Mayne. He said the Russians know the contractor, delayed at a tim a counter- further U.S. alienation of th Arab states. Excerpt Printed The account of American in volvement in the 1973 war (Continued: Pago S, Col. 6.) (Continued: Page 3, Col. C.) Mayors Take No Stand on Watergate SAN DIEGO, Calif. (AP) The leader of the nation's may ors said Saturday the impassi in Washington could be resolved by the immediate resignation 01 impeachment of President Nix on, but his colleagues refuscc to formally embroil themselves in Watergate politics. Democratic Mayor Roy Mar- :in of Norfolk, Va., said'a pro- onged trial of the President would be disastrous for the na- ion and particularly for critical urban legislation stalled in the congress. Martin, who said he wasn't endorsing impeachment or res- gnation, made his comments during a news conference open- ng the 42nd annual meeting of he U. S. Conference of Mayors, if which he is president. He said a critical lack of eadership from Washington could be resolved "by either mmediate impeachment and conviction, resignation or for- get it." But when the conference ses- tions formally began, other mayors apparently thought it iest to avoid the controversy. Vith scant debate, the rcsolu- ions committee killed three iroposed measures dealing with Vatcrgate and related matters. One would have asked con- gress to write a strict legal def- attack. The Kalbs say their book is based on interviews with most of the major participants, high officials and other informed sources, plus scrutiny of avail- able records, public and pri- vate. The following account is taken from the excerpts in the Times! magazine: Kissinger felt double-crossed! by the Russians at the outset ofi the war, in view of agreements promising to inform the U.S. of "any threat to the peace." Soviet Effort He also was angry because the massive Soviet supply effort at the beginning of the war in- dicated the Russians must have calculated they could have both detente and war. Kissinger's original strategy, ,vas to avoid provoking the Arabs with a large-scale Ameri can supply effort, and he sharcc he common assumption thai srael could quickly repulse the Arab attack. When that did not prove out, Kissinger began working to get Rochester Ploodings Teleprioto lid for Israel, ilanes and tanks. particularly But early on the morning of Oct. 8, 48 hours after the out- ireak of fighting, the book says, Ichlesinger refused even to illow Israeli planes lo pick up immunition and spare parts in he United States. Political Power Kissinger cleared this up later bat morning, but acknowledged Israeli Ambassador Simcha Mnitz he could get only two 'hantom jets released for the ewish state. When the defense department eluctantly said it might allow Phantoms to go to Israel, )initz indicated to Kissinger he invoke the political power River water at Rochester, Minn., was slowly receding Saturday and some of the 100 persons who had been driven from their homes by the high water were returrifng. The Zumbro river crested at five feet above flood level Friday and the National Weather Service said it was receding Saturday. Ten Fires Blamed on Arsonists SPOKANE, Wash. (AP) broke out at the Villa Twelve fires erupted in Spokane I Nova apartments, the North and its suburbs Saturday, and officials of three fire depart- ments said at least 10 of them were the work of arsonists. The most serious destroyed a three- story apartment building, leav- ing about 60 persons homeless. Within a period, Side building, Automotive Ware- house Distributors, Inc., and Gung Ho restaurant. Wooden Shed Fires also struck a motorcyc- le distributorship, a truck dis- tributorship, two parked cars, For of; Neutral Party Should Review Tapes three parked trucks, and a wooden shed in a suburban Officials said a total of seven trucks were damaged. Spokane Fire Chief Alfred O'Conner said it was not known whether the fires were the work of the same arsonist. "It's still too early to say whether these are all O'Conner said. "They are all under investigation." Eleven trucks answered the pre-dawn three-alarm call for assistance at the apartment building, a brick structure perched on a steep hillside at the western edge of the city's key locations, a two-alarm call came from the building supply (Continued: Page 3, Col. 2.) 'contents. MONTEREY, Calif. (AP) While ruling himself out of Ford suggested isucli a job, Ford said an in- on Saturday that an indepen-j dependent listener could iron downtown area. cnmnanv dent third party might listen alleged discrepancies be-l Flames began in the base- pdn-v he Watergate tapes and the transcripts O'Connor said, shortly! The quonset-hut structure, lo- an unbiased transcript of thciriby the White House and :l-m- A' noon, remnants catcd across from an empty fire warehouse when the apartment alarm was received. Damage there was contained to a loading dock and door. But soon after the apartment was reported in flames, crews were dispatched to the restau- rant, where a set blaze dam- aged a doorway and trash con- tainer. city arson investigator Capt. Paul R. Nolan said. As firemen struggled there, flames broke out in an auto- mobile parked 50 feet away. Apparatus At that point, with all the city's fire apparatus shifted to Hospitals Take Note Man To Watch Out For By Gary Peterson What do hospitals in Cedar Rapids, Molinc, 111., and Bill- ings, Mont., have in common? The answer: A man who calls himself Dr. James Rob- erts, and he's not your average sort of doctor. Without a doubt, many other hospitals in the country have heard of Dr. James Rob- erts and each may have the same story In loll about him. Hospitals beware, the man is a con man, and a very adept one, and not in mi ordi- nary Kcnse drugs arc (he object of his con, according to local physicians. This particular con is not new, but it is seldom hoard of and bears a Irxlhook name..... "iVIundiaiiscn Tin; following is I lie story related by Dr. Roberts to SI. Luke's hospital personnel anil allcnding physicians and Ihcir reaclious to him. lie arrived al Hie emer- gency room by ambulance in late May, complaining of pain indicative of kidney problems. Routine tests indicated blood in his urine and he was admitted. Though stories varied slight- ly from person to person, Dr. Roberts said he was a provost at the University of the West Indies and most recently had completed a commencement speaking engagement in Van- couver, B.C. lie said he was returning to the West Indies when he suf- fered a kidney attack and the plane on which he was riding made an emergency landing at Cedar Rapids so he could seek medical help. Complaining of intense pain, Dr. Roberts said lie was aller- gic to morphine and ilcmand- ril 151) milligrams of demenil, a pain killer that is addictive. Doctors said 1511 milligrams is illllllll twll'c Illl' dnsc. He was a palii'iil at Hie hos- pilal for Ihrci! days during which lime he was adminis- tered several shots and tests. On his second day he re- ceived "tragic" news Ihat his grandmother had died. He checked out on the third day, arranging with the hospital to bill him in the West Indies. He also look with him some which had been collected In help pay for his unsched- uled trip home. He promised to repay the money. II was not until two or three days after the patient's de- parture thai the con became evident. One of the women involved in Hie collection of the for Dr. Roberts' trip to I he West Indies. Mrs. Hurley Haysclt, was atlemling a church meet- ing in lies Monies. There, a minister from Ilav- I'nnni't iclalcd a story alioiil n provost from the University nt the West Indies who was hos- pitalized In with n kid- ney ailment. On lop of that. Ins grand- mother in Hie West Indies died and cfforls were under- way to raise some funds ,ro he would be able to attend the tu- ncral. Mrs. Rassell suspected the worst and made a call to Mrs. Kingsloy (Irani in Cedar Rapids. Mrs. Grant told her husband, Dr. Gram, who had had occasion to visit with the patient. Dr. (Irani notified Dr. Percy Harris, also a Frequent vis- ilor with the patient during his s'lay at St. Luke's. Dr. Harris called Hie Moline hospital to find mil if they did, in fact, have a Dr. James Koberls as a patient tlu'ri'. They did and Dr. Harris had his call transferred to I he pa- room and and talked with him. Harris was told that Dr. Huberts had had another at- tack and tin! plane was Forced lo land in Molino Tin' call apparently friglil- cni'il the. patient. He let! the hospital paying. lie later .showed up in Hill- ings, Mont., using (hi! same (Continued: Page HA, Col. I.) from corners I station, was heavily damaged. As the fire was being fought, thc second car burst into flames on thc same street. Meanwhile, 1 developed by Ihe house stil1 flarin jary committee, which is thc' building, ducting impeachment hearings1 All Evacuated on President Nixon. Apartment m a n ag e r Dale Meanwhile, Spokane Valley Neutral Party i Kuder said all residents ap- fire department crews were dis- jparently were evacuated from patched to what officials said ferhaps we have to have ajthc structure. But (were arson fires at a truck dis- Ihird or neutral party take the O'Connor said firemen planned j tributorship. In the same area, tapes and get transcripts search the partially caved-inlthc motorcycle shop was set them." Ford told a news confer-i building. aflame. Damage there was con- enee here, where he is T'lc apartment blaze was; fined to smoke and water, a "olfing weekend "'classified as possible arson. No! A blaze handled by suburban "I nii'l tell vnii how it oslimate District 
                            

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 145+ million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

10 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 10 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 145 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 19 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication