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   Cedar Rapids Gazette (Newspaper) - June 22, 1974, Cedar Rapids, Iowa                                Weather- Cloudy and continued cool through Sunday. Ixjws Saturday in 50s. Hicks Sunday in 60s. CKDAH ItAPIDS, IOWA, SATUKDAY. JUNK 22. 1974 CITY FINAL 15 CENTS ASSOCIATED PKKSS, UPI, NKW YORK TIMES Sfldat Warned Nixon Curb Nixon Abouf Mifche" Of Israelis WASH INC TON (AP) session in which he talked toi By United Press luti'inatiumil Egyptian President Anwar has sent an urgent letter to President Nixon asking him to pressure Israel into halting raids on Palestinian refugee camps in Lebanon, government sources in Cairo said Saturday. Israeli soldiers meanwhile began efforts to seal the 50-mile border with Lebanon and stop guerilla attacks. Israeli Chief of Staff Lt. Gen. Mordechai Gur said troops were taking positions to "seal the frontier hermetically." Israel called on Lebanon to shut off the border to guerillas. Letter to U. N. Israel warned Friday in a let- ter to the U. N. that Lebanon must decide whether it is an in- dependent nation or is con- trolled by "Palestinian murder and terrorist organizations." A Cairo newspaper quoted Egyptian government sources as saying Sadat condemned the Israeli air attacks and asked Nixon to "take a firm stand." "Egypt will not stand with arms folded in face of these repeated aggressions on Leban- on and is prepared to take the necessary measures to deter the Israeli the letter warned. The U. S. state department called Friday for both Lebanon and Israel to end the cycle of vi- olence and retaliation. Charles Colson has told house judiciary committee counsel that he twice warned President 'I Nixon, in January and again in I February, 1973, that former At- jtorney General John Mitchell was involved in the Watergate Sadat Plans To Ask Billion NEW YORK (AP) Pres- ident Sadat plans to ask the U. S. for billion in compensation for oil pumped by Israel from the Sinai desert over the last seven years. In an interview with CBS News televised Friday, Sadat was asked by Walter Cronkite what direct economic aid he ex- pected from the U. S. He replied: "I expect to see only million, but I can't compare it with what you have given to Israel. And, for in- stance, I'm losing every year million from my oil that's exploited in Sinai by the Israe- lis. It makes about billion. I'm going to ask for it also." Chopper Gift WASHINGTON (UPI) Pres- ident Nixon gave one of his helicopters to President Sadat during his visit to Egypt, the White House has confirmed. The White House said it was 12 years old and congress al- ready has appropriated funds to get Nixon a new one. Normally it would have reverted lo Ihe U. S. military. Gradual Rise in Gas Cost Seen; Nixon has asserted repeatedly that he first learned of high- level participation in the break- in and coverup on March 21, 1973, when he was told by John Dean. Virtually identical reports of Colson's statements were pub- lished Saturday by the New York Daily News and Columnist Jack Anderson. Committee of- ficials refused comment, but Colson's attorney and former law partner, David Shapiro, confirmed that "it's all there" in the published accounts. The Daily News quoted Colson as telling Nixon in January, 1973, that Mitchell had advance knowledge of the breakin. It said Colson told of a Feb. 14 Nixon of Mitchell's role and the; nvolvement of Jeb ,hcn deputy.director of Nixon's' re-election campaign, in the planning of the Watergate af- fair. The judiciary committee ap- pears likely to question Colson about Nixon's role in an attempt- ed smear. Colson said President on Jackson Says Missile Pact Lids Juggled WASHINGTON (AP) Sena- tor Jackson (D-Wash.) charges that the administration secretly negotiated "rather startling" changes in the U. S. and Soviet missile levels permitted under the; SALT agreement. Knowledgeable sources said a "subsequent agreement" was reached after the original 1972 pact. The sources said the 95C sea-based missiles permitted the Soviet Union were raised to while the U. S. total was lowered from 710 to 656, the level before the strategic arms limitation talks agreement was reached. Jackson said he plans to ask Secretary of State Kissinger about the matter when Kis- singer testifies Monday before Jackson's armed services sub- committee on arms control. Asked about Jackson's state- ment as he emerged from a briefing for the senate armed services committee Friday, Kis- singer replied, "Such views must be based on some misap- prehension of the negotiations." Jackson, who has been criti cal of President Nixon's detente policy, told newsmen he has received "reliable and credit- able information" that the missile ceilings "are higher the Soviets and lower fo. Americans" than those congress in 1972. "It's a material he added. "It's not a matter of talking about five or 10 mis- siles." Jackson said "we were led to believe there would be good consultation with the congress" but the administration failed to give the information about the changed missile levels. Friday: numerous 'The! oc- casions urged me to dissemi- nate damaging information] about Daniel Ellsberg." The former presidential aide made the statement before he was sentenced to one to three years for obstructing justice. He had pled guilty of scheming to "defame and destroy" the pub- lic image of Ellsberg in 1971. After the statement, several committee members said Col- son should be called to testify in the panel's impeachment inqui- ry. "Serious Questions" Chairman Rodino said: "Certainly the develop- ments of today raise serious questions as to what that (Col- son's statement) implies." The chairman would not comment directly on whether Colson would be called but -said the committee "absolutely" would look into the matter. It has scheduled meetings for next week to decide such mat- ters as what, if any, witnesses will be called and whether the testimony will be open to the public. Committee Counsel John Doar said he and the minority coun- sel, Albert Jenner, had ques- tioned Colson and were likely to talk to him further. Vice-president Ford said he does not believe Nixon ordered Colson to carry out the breakin into the office of Ellsberg's psy- chiatrist. Ellsberg leaked the Pentagon Papers, a study of the Vietnam war, to the press. One Reason Ford said there is a difference between the President asking an aide to smear someone, as claimed by Colson, and ordering a breakin. Colson told U. S. District Judge Gerhard Gesell that one reason for his guilty plea was to allow him to testify in the im- peachment hearing. He said thej work of the special prosecutor and the committee is "far more important than the possibility of my eventual public vindica- tion." The White House communi- cations director, Ken Clawson, charged that the same felony for which Colson was sentenced defaming a person under in- dictment "has been standard practice of members and staff of the Watergate committee for more than a year and is the same felony committed daily by some partisan members of the house judiciary committee." 2 Electrocuted; Boy, 6, Drowns iBy Gazette leased Wires A six-year-old boy drowned and two windmills on the Martin farm, hut missed the house. '.Saturday in a flash flood as a! Heard N'nise .third wave of severe storms andj said hc woke ahou, damaging winds reaching m of st per hour whipped across wind and heard lhc lnwa h'Kllway a blast in another room. Imva .said. Troopers at the patrol's Ce- dar Falls office said the uniden- The force of the wind knocked out several windows in the house, but left two silos and a jtificd child was swept away in a I fed house, located near the flash flood on a creek onc-and-farm house, untouched. in-half miles south of Whittcn inj Several sheep were pinned southeast llardin county. in lnc barn wreckage, but Information was sketchy be- tno Martjns were able to re- cause high winds knocked out move tne debris to rescue them. i telephone service to much ofi the county. No Estimate Body Found j No estimate of damage has 'been made, but Martin said a The child's body was found late Saturday morning during a search in which an estimated 300 persons participated, au- thorities said. Two persons were electrocut- Krogfi, Back Home, with His Son, Matthew, 4 Probe Is Good Thing Link Crash For Country-Krogh IXlnT W ASHINGTON (AP) had taught him some- Former White House aide "I found out how impor- Krogh, home from prison, saysjtant it is to respect each individ- the Watergate investigation is ual's rights." argc quantity of hay stored in :he barn was lost. The tornado caused some damage on other farms located nearby, although it was general- ly limited to fallen tree limbs. A circus truck was overturned by the high wind about 5 a.m. Saturday a half-mile west of the West Liberty interchange of In- terstate 80. Authorities said the driver, Stanley Vaught, 26, Huntington, W. Va., became concerned said a car driven about the wind and started to pull onto the shoulder of the road. sen, struck a utility pole after it The wind caught the truck, [left the road and plunged into a i however, and turned it over. ditch during the severe weather. Passenger Hurt Fire Fighter.. A passenger, Pierre Tetatit, Wireohoto ed in connection with the weather. Plymouth County sheriff's deputies said a woman was electrocuted when her car came in contact with a downed power line along a county road near Rcmsen. Authorities by a recent local high school I graduate, Jean Heidesch, Rem- having a good effect on the na-, tion. Some Changes He said he would make some "The trials, the in the acti0ns that led the sentences, all are just aL his conviction i{ he could live LOS ANGELES (AP) Un- even terrain, not an .anti- aircraft missile fired by the Symbionese Liberation Army, j caused the crash of a police (helicopter last month, a Federal [Aviation Administration inves- tigation has determined. The FAA said Friday: "The small part of coming to ljfe agajn ..r wouid certain- helicopter began a rotational with what this country not engage in anything that he said Friday. "And that's a good thing." Krogh, who supervised the White House agents who bur- glarized the offices of Dr. Lewis Fielding, the psychiatrist of Pentagon Papers defendant Daniel Ellsberg, made the com- their two children arrived home. descent where it struck uneven terrain and rolled down the hill. A fire fighter trying to rescue the woman, Robert Arens ol Remsen, was also electrocuted authorities said. Ray Cram, 57, Wilton, spent a half-hour with a hot wire dan- gling only inches from his face Friday after the utility pole he had climbed broke and fell, pin- ning him beneath it. Cram, a lineman for Eastern Iowa Light and Power Coopera- tive, was in serious condition in Davenport. A spokesman for the utility said Cram was working atop a 35-foot utility pole to restore a Fire ensued and the aircraft Power. "ne dama8ed in Thurs; Iday night s storm a mile south of Bennett. was stupid, unlawful or he added. Krogh pled guilty Nov. 30 ofiwas destroyed." conspiring to violate the rights The highest-ranking Los An- of Fielding. He was sentenced to geles' police officer ever killed Some Tornadoes two to six years but all but duty, Cmdr. Paul Gillen, died months of that was suspended. in 
                            

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