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Cedar Rapids Gazette Newspaper Archive: June 21, 1974 - Page 5

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Publication: Cedar Rapids Gazette

Location: Cedar Rapids, Iowa

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   Cedar Rapids Gazette (Newspaper) - June 21, 1974, Cedar Rapids, Iowa                                CiJirls Scene The Cedar Rapids 5 Gazette: Frl.. June 21, 1974 First Reading Given New Right Turn on Red Rule liy Larry laimer ;ruuncil al p.m. in the coun-ifur the No. 1 pavinK project at rir.v''. for the intern'c'.ion of Tcn'h on an ordinance establishing electrical construction project, i null Twenty-second street, new section of city code con-j will be! Kcqnirement rij-ht turns on a red underground and addi- traffic light Thursday niRht Hunts will be! Amount of the extra cost will Hie .Marion council. 'j installed in the area. determined by the- bid unit' The city code is bdiu; brought I Retroactive to June I, in .line legislation a hike in thej The council waived the during the recent session of subsidy paid for hus.araie rcslrooin facilities re- i _.i ,-__ i ..i ii... i.. Q -slate legislature. service to and from in the building cod'-; A motorist may make a right '1'he subsidy was raisedjfor the C and I, Drywall turn on a red light after stop.! from tu j Fifth avenue. ping, Intersection.'; where such j Vrojevl 1'rogrcss l''inal payment of was au- turns mav not be made will he I I (homed for Herman Thompson! designated I Cll-v kngmccr Terry Chew told for lhc ;ni! rcnoJ the council the city's No. 1 pay- valion City Attorney Jiobert ,1. Stone, said ilJie new code goes into ef- fect Hilly ;l, but signs prohibiting the right turns at specified inter- sections are not expected to ar- rive by the first of month. Hid Letting A public hearing ;nul bid let- ting was set for July 10 at 1) a.m. in the council chambers for phases 2 and1, 3 of the public library project. These phases in- clude elevator installation and air-conditioning. Another hearing and bid let- ting was set for July 18 by the ing project is 34 percent corn- lie, .said costs were running eight percent over the contract beeausu of the extremely wet conditions in some areas. The extra cost cannot be added to the assessments, paid by property owners, councilmen emphasized. The city will pay that amount. Final payment of was made (a Blue Grass En- terprises for the 1973 seeding and sodding project. A change order was approved Minor Storm Damage Is Reported in Marion City officials reported only minor damage resulting from the wind and rain storm late Thursday afternoon. Firemen had to use emer- gency power for three-and-one- half hours in the evening when a large tree limb knocked down a power line in the alley ad- jacent to the station, GOO Eighth avenue. One fire call came at p.m. at the Kenneth Hush resi- dence. Charcoal burning in a stove in the backyard was mis- takenly thought to be a house fire during the high wind and the fire department was titled. Firemen were called later to the Harry Schrriinkey home, 1235 D avenue, for a grease fire in the oven. Damage was con- fined to the oven. This fire was Hurt in 1971 Crash, M. L. Parton Dies M. Lloyd Parton, 37, a former resident of Marion, died Thurs- day in a Waterloo hospital of in- juries suffered in an auto ac- cident Aug. 28, 1971, near Wa- verly. Born Jan. 2, 1937, at Santa Rosa, Mo., he made his home in Marion from 1948-1963, moving to Waverly where he had been employed by the United Hy- draulics Co.. for five years until his accident. Mr. Parton was a member of the Lutheran church. Surviving are a son, Kenneth Parton, and fwo daughters, Pa- mela and Jean, all of Waverly; his mother, Mable Weingart, Marion; a brother, Nelson Par- ton, Columbia, Mo.; and five sisters, Mrs. Neil Wood, Dorothy Brown, and Mrs. David Wassm'cr, all of Marion; Mrs. K.W. Arnold of Evansville, and Mrs. Hurrol Goodwin of In- dian Head, Mel. Services: p.m. Monday at the Murdoch chapel in Marion, 'by the Rev. John C. Philipp of St. John Lutheran church, Wa- verly. Burial: Cedar Memorial. Friends may call at the chapel after 2 p.m. Sunday. The casket will be closed at 1 p.m. Monday and not opened after the ser- vice. not related to the storm, fire- men said. Several large limbs and par- Mi trees were reported blown down by the winds. Marion Independent school district officials said a report ;hat windows had' been blown out of Starry school was not cor- rect. No windows were lost and officials could find no other damage at the building. One of- ficial said windows were broken at Marion high school, but not during Thursday's storm. He termed these a case of vandal- sm. Attend Funeral Mrs. Victoi Thompson, Kerri and Glenda 895 West Ninth avenue, attendee funeral services Wednesday for Laura May Jurgenson, 9-year 'old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Verne Jurgenson at Ottumwa. She died Monday at an Ottum- BUILD A NEW HOME ON YOUR LOT ANY PLAN-ANY SIZE ANY STYLE-ANY DESIGN ANYWHERE Wl; Will BUIID ANY PIAN OUT OF OUR CATAIOG OR ANY PIAN OF YOUR OWN. FREE ESTIMATES CHEERFULLY FURNISHED 30 DAY DELIVERY GUARANTIED PRICE HIGHEST QUALITY CATALOG Pdco Liil-Ownon till TY BENNETT, RUILDER R.R. ELY, IOWA PH. 848-4J68 U.S. HOMES 5370 2ND AVI. DK MOINIS. ation projee The regular meeting (late of the council falls on July this] year, so the group decided to] meet on July 3 at 8 a.m. Dance License A dance license was renewal 'or the Longbranch supper club, 90 Twixt Town road. A class B jeer permit was approved for he Pizza Hut, 1300 Seventh ave- nue, which is a new business. Class C beer and liquor pcr- nits were renewed for Club Royale, 1195 Seventh avenue, ind Stickney's Scoreboard, 740 Tenth street. A class A beer and liquor per- mit was renewed for the Indian Country club, Indian Oreek road. Nine cigarct permit applica- tions were renewed by the coun- il. Does your Pharmacy provide health sendees information for you? We do! Sorg Pharmacy. Adv. Missouri Guests Mr. and Mrs. Walter Vaughn, Kansa; City, were guests Thursday in the home of Bertha Miller, 2255 Israel: "Peace Quest chief Krogh Released UALTIMGIU; (AP) ligil i Krogh, head the White House Won't Bar Reprisals" By Associated Press !ru! said 30 Palestinian refugees null; MjIlM .u.-U J-- V.UUUUV.-U will not stop its strikes'Thursday wli'.-n n'tiil'ee a! Arab Croups that kill Israeli camps were hit. A Lebanese :government ijxike.srnar. said l-Ti.el will "continue its whole- m-artcd for speeding (lie plumbers was released Kridav communique. Thursday n i g h In.in ine foreign ministry in 'Jerusalem. lint the added that Israel will also con- Mnl: from a iederal detention center "some'.vhere in the Haltimorc authorities said. Krogh was -entenced ,lan. 24 to six months in prison for his nart in the hurelary of   corporation's claim administrator of American mill- of status and set rm A guerilla spokesman in ISei- in (.on. assessed value of on the firmed Thursday that Russian I'ropwty. Bonn Pir'f deliveries to Kgvpl have Hoys Acres was described in Clb rcior :been curtailed. the petition as a child care Zechs To "owevcr. be said, "Thi; .Soviet jgroup home for homeless and laid program has become boys. Because it was I Igsimore generous in organization for charitable t fi imitments and deliveries to Sy-jand educational purposes it lAP; The West These be exempt from taxes, man parliament ratified remained closely lied toLstated the petition. reaty Iliur.sday normalizing re-JRussia while Egypt has sought1---------------------- lalions with Czechoslovakia with the U. S DIUVK SAFELY annulling the Munich pact of! 1938. In a ballot along party lines. he was unaware of the costly j the Liberal-Socialist coalition oreign exchange voted approval of the LONDON (AP) The minori- ty Labor government was de- feated in parliament Friday for the third time in three It put Prime Minister Wilson under increased pressure to call Britain's second general elec- tions in less than a year. The vote was not on a motion of confidence and Wilson is not bound to resign. Under the Brit- ish system the prime minister is free to call elections at any time, but if he loses on a motion of confidence he is expected to call a ballot promptly. Several members of Wilson's cabinet reportedly are urging him to call general elections this summer to seek a clear ma- jorily for Labor. Friday's 49-12 defeat was on a government proposal to amend a proposed lotlery bill. Thursday night the house of commons by a J21-vote margin rejected a government proposa to nationalize or take partia control of a number of indus On Wednesday the commons by nine votes rejected Labor's plan to refund million ii taxes to trade unions, and the government suffered four minoi defeats in a committee con 'There is an old saying that the nick stops at the top." In a 12-page statement, the lank said it was not "presently i participant in any negotiations nvolving a merger, sales of assets or other disposition of my interest in the bank." Stock Swindle In an unrelated development, a former official of Franklin and another man pleaded guilty .0 taking part in a million swindle in which the bank's sidering its finance bill. Robert Mcllish, Labor's blun floor manager, said the dcefal of the nationalization proposa was "a clear indication to the country that the minorily gov ernmcnt cannot proceed very much longer. The elector- ate must how be ready and must understand why there will have to be a general election." Wilson said only (hat his party would "consider all the implica- tions" of its defeat. Rapp Calls for U.S. Budget Cut ALLISON Congress shoulc slash the proposed budget billion, State Rep. Stephen Rapp of Waterloo, the candidate for Third district con gressman, said Thursday. Addressing the Third distric Democratic central committee Rapp said the present infla tionary level makes it "abso lulcly imperative" that congress not only balance the budget bu also provide for a budgetary surplus. He said billion could be cut from the defense budget by trimming troop levels in Europe, slowing development of somej weapons and tightening pro-j curemenl practices; billion] on foreign aid and billion oni the space and public works pro-j ;rcaty and the opposition Chris-, tian Democrats voted against. Passage of the treaty marks lhc final step in Bonn's Ostpoli- tik a policy of reconciliation with East European countries begun by former Chancellor Willy Brandt. Bonn now has dip- lomatic relations with all Soviet Bloc states. Brandt and former Foreign Minister Walter Scheel jour- neyed to Prague last December to sign the treaty. The treaty text says: "The FREE GOBLET money was used to invest in agreement of Sept. 29, stock market- Robert Noole, 30, a former Branch supervisor in the bank's securities department, and Rob- ert Tomarkin, 44, an indepen- dent securities trader, were ac- cused of stealing More than half of that amount was recovered by the bank. According to the indictment, the pair used the bank's million to buy securities and repaid the bank million from their investments before getting caught in a falling mar- ket. 1938, was forced on the Czechos- lovak republic by the Nazi re- gime under the threat of force." It declares the Munich agree- ment "null and void" with resp- ect the Czech-West German re- lations. Affirming the inviolability of their common frontier, both countries promise to "refrain from the threat or use of force." The Christian Democrats said the treaty was unbalanced, with West Germany making most of the concessions and Czechoslo- vakia offering little in return. I with deposit! Your choice of throe elegant styles FREE with a qualifying deposit in a First National Savings Account or Certificate of Deposit. Additional goblets available at beautifully reduced prices. Start your collection today! (Limit, one free gift per family.) First National Bank of Marion Member F.D.I.C. 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