Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Share Page

Cedar Rapids Gazette: Tuesday, June 18, 1974 - Page 1

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Cedar Rapids Gazette (Newspaper) - June 18, 1974, Cedar Rapids, Iowa                                Weather- Chance of rain to- night, laws, low 60s. HiKh Wednesday in up- per 80s. cur FINAL CK1WK KAPIDS. IOWA, TUESDAY, JUNK 18, 1974 15 CENTS ASSOCiATKD I'KKSS, UPI, NEW YORK TIMES MEAT BUY SET Key G.O.P. Nixon Foes Weakening WASHINGTON (UPI) The three or four Republicans on the house judiciary committee once considered probable votes in favor of impeachment arc now wavering because, as one of them put it. the evidence so far "just isn't there." "It's far too early to predict how this will come out I'm not sure how I'm going to vote but I'm one of the key Republicans said, ask- ing not to be quoted by name. "The Democrats are blowing the case. As of now the evidence just isn't there." He added there has been "some damaging but there are many gaps that have to be filled before he will make up liis mind. Another of the key Republi- cans agreed, adding: "The case is weak It's not as strong as I thought it would be." Most Evidence Heard The Republicans' conclusions are important because the com- mittee has already heard most of the evidence in the Watergate case itself, plus evidence in key areas as the milk and ITT matters. The committee hopes to com- plete closed door hearings this week, taking up the firing of special Watergate prosecutor Archibald Cox; Nixon's personal finances, including his income taxes; and his ordering of the secret Cambodia bombing. While none of the Republicans has committed himself, for some months it has been con- ceded that the minority members most likely to vote for impeachment were Reps. Fish of New York, Cohen of Maine, Railsback of Illinois and Mc-j Clory of Illinois. Votes Critical Their votes are considered critical to the future of im- peachment in the congress. One of them explained their role this way: "If there are. three out of 17 Republican votes on the com- mittee in favor of impeachment, that's enough to make it bipar- tisan. Remember the Republi- cans on the committee are more conservative than the Republi- cans on the floor of the house. "If there are three Republi- SCOD6 Government Moves To Of CitizenBoos' Markei] WE WASHINGTON lAP) substitutes will become! While House's economic chiefithe rule rather than the excep-S announced Tuesday Ihe govern- I Ci DfllllWiml'nt wi" "P lo ?HM) millinn "Humping Ground" i i worth of beef and pork this! Tlie speaker attributed WASHINGTON (AP) to help relieve the I than 1.25 billion pieces of infor-j lion's depressed cattle and "dumnine "ground'" for their! niation about. American citizensi'miustry- ibcef; farmers and ranchers K c n n e I h Rush, economic.., fc. th f b f had, counselor lo President toon the meat would be donated_______ the, foreignj our Ends liave been collected in informa- tion data banks by 54 federal agencies, !told. congress has been i to school lunch programs. HP I said Nixon approved the pur- Champagne Surprise Vice-president Ford grimaces  anks, littered with diverse in- ormation on just about every citizen in the Chair- man Ervin (D-N.C.) said of the The subcommittee says it is attempting to protect individual r i v a c y against undue en- croachment by data banks naintained by federal, stale, ocal and commercial agencies. "Whittled Away" :As each new data bank is created and each additional bit of personal information is re- corded, that precious sphere ol privacy in which an individua: can do as he pleases withoul qutside interference is slowly but surely whittled Ervin said. The survey said there were a least, 858 federal data banks, o which 86 percent are compu terized. It said that 'the grea majority were established with out legislative authority. The report also said about data banks are concerned pri marily with negative informa tion, including agency black lists, intelligence and civil dis- turbance files. Ervin called for legislation to include these safeguards: Explicit legal authority foi creation of each data bank as well as legislative approval for each decision to computerize files. Notifying subjects that per sonal information about them is stored in a federal data ban! and providing opportunities to review and correct the records. Limits on exchange of data bank information between agen cies. Strict security precautions protect the data banks fron unauthorized or illegal access. Conlinned legislative contro over the purposes, content am uses of government data sys terns. liases now "while farm live- lock prices are low in order to rovide student lunches during ic coming school year." j "It's good business to buy icse meat supplies Rush aid in a statement. "We would e buying this meat for school [inches anyway. By buying ow, we help the cattlemen and; og producers, who are suffer-1 ig from low prices and we help revent future dislocations in :ie market that would adverse- y affect consumer prices." The agriculture department las already purchased about 105 iflunds of beef and pork during he current fiscal year to end une 30. To Start in July j Rush said the meat will he! purchased beginning early in luly with deliveries to begin Aug. 11. He said the meat will )e stored at a cost of about 1.5 cents per pound for use during the 1974-75 school year. Commenting on the White House announcement, Claire (Continued: Page Col. 8.1 Presbyterian Sects Aim at Healing Rift LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) Presbyterians, divided North and South since the Civil Tuesday headed into a series of joint sessions aimed at healing! their century-old split. "We have learned that 113 years of separation have not succeeded in producing two dif- ferent kinds of Presbyterianism in this said a fore- word to a 120-page draft propos- al for reunification. "We have a common heri- tage and a genuine unity of faith and life We are con- vinced tfcat full union alone is and necessary AMMAN, Jordan (AP) President Nixon ended his tour of the Middle East Tuesday with a promise of continued military and economic assistance lo Jor- and an invitation to King i Hussein for talks in Washington !on "the strategy of future ef- iforts to achieve-peace" between I the Arabs and Israel. The President left Amman for an overnight stop in Por- tugal's Azores islands in mid- Atlantic. He will hold talks there Wednesday with the lead- er of Portugal's revolution, President Antonio de Spinola, before returning to Washington. Would Resume Robinson, president of the Kansas Livestock Assn., said: pleased with their an nouncemcnt but they're a long way from the cure. If the mea was purchased all a( one time it would represent about 2'.2 days of slaughter." Earlier, in testimony before :he house agriculture commit- House Speaker Albert called the situation in the live- stock industry an economic de- jacle and said, "The admhiistra- :ion gives every evidence that it understands neither the depth nor the meaning of the prob- lem." "The congress may well be faced with one of the most serious economic problems since the Albert (D-Okla.) said in opening three days of hearings. We have discovered how much we need each other." Involved in the joint meeting! the'first held in 50 years, wer delegates to the governing as semblies of the Presbyteria church in the U. S., a Souther body, and (he United Presby terian church, a denominatioi with members throughout fhi nation. United Presbyterians number about 3 million and the Southcri body about If reunited, the new church would have about members, making it the fourth argest Christian body in the country, next to the Roman Catholic, Southern Baptist ant United Methodist churches The action proposed here is for the two assemblies to autho rize a two-year, churchwidi study of the reunion plan, whicl means that no legislative sane Livestock prices have fallen Ition coultl be until 197C. for News Of Pat Remains H1LLSBOROUGH. Calif. (UPI) The Randolph Hearst family has no plans to withdraw the reward offered for in- formation leading to the return of their kidnaped daughter, Pa- tricia. Spokesman John Lester told reporters at the Hearst home Monday that the offer will con- tinue "as long as she's out steadily at the farm level for eight months while holding rela- tively high at the retail level. Three Measures Albert gave his support to three of the proposed solutions being put forward by a large number of congressmen: An mediate moratorium on beef! imports, passage of a guaran-j teed loan program for the meat industry and purchases by fed- eral departments of excess beef. "If the department of agricul- ture and the administration re- fuse to recognize the problem, then it is up to congress to take Albert said. "In implementing these sug- gestions it is important to con- sider the consumer, for the ul- timate result of the present trend of the cattle industry will be complete scarcity of beef for the consumer. Beef will become If approved then by the a: semblies, it still would have t be ratified by local units to b 1 put into effect. A joint Jordanian-American .atement issued in Amman aid Nixon and his royal host at ic last stop on his five-nation swing discussed a hole range of issues and would esume their talks in Washing- an early date." The joint statement promised i "special effort" by the U.S. [overnment to assist Jordanian iconomic development and to 'play a strong role in maintain- ng Jordan's military strength. "It was agreed that a joint Jordanian-U.S. commission will established at a high level to oversee and review on a regular basis the various areas of coop- eration in the fields of eco- nomic development, trade, in- vestments, military assistance, and scientific, social and cultur- al affairs." King Hussein hailed Nixon's "journey for peace" in a ban- quet toast Monday night but cautioned that "the final goal is still many milestones away." Next Step Hussein said the withdrawal of Israeli forces from some of he Jordanian territory cap- ,ured in 1967 should be the next >tep and was "an essential )rerequisite to any permanent settlement." The king said he hoped this disengagement of Israeli and Jordanian forces along the Jor- dan river could be accomplished "with the strong and friendly hand of an indication that he would welcome a Jeru- salem-Amman diplomatic shut- tle by Secretary of State Kis- I singer. Echoing what Nixon's hosts in Egypt, Saudi Arabia and Syria had told him, Hussein also called for Israeli withdrawal from all occupied Arab territo- ry, restoration of Arab sover- eignty over the Arab sector of Jerusalem, and recognition and restoration of the "legitimate rights of the Palestinian people" to return to their homeland and determine their own future. Nixon in response said the ten through college. Authorized by a two-year-old jnjcc( "one ncw clement" into HEW Sets Rules To Prohibit Sex Bias in Schools WASHINGTON (AP) The department of health, education and welfare announced Tuesday controversial rules prohibiting sex discrimination in the na- tion's schools, from kindergar- fedcral law. the proposed regu- lations arc designed to assure equal treatment for females Of admissions, athletics, the Middle East (lie use of its influence to bring together lead- financial assistance. extracur-jjlls, ricular activities and employ- jcms nations with disagree- 'to try to find fair and solutions to these prob- so scarce and expensive that! nuiuv LU OHIKI jusl before i is in charge of arrangements. Sabotaged; Slams Viet Reds for Balking ment. also decided lo postpone the question of calling witnesses mi- j W. Va. Vice-president til Ihe committee in his sharpest attack so the specific areas of Ihe inquiry j far on critics of Henry Kis-j on whidl intends Ihe missing in Indo-China, Vowed To Escalate B u I Palestinian guerillas different Nixon ".and vowed to escalate attacks dormitory curfews for girls, as well as most single-sex scholar-: They would require coeduca- tional physical education classes anil outlaw !against Israel "despite renewed SAIGON (UPI) The U. S.icounting for the 1.100 Ameri-iilary attacks and are still Irate. Cong and North Vietnam in a The inquiry began with and backbiting." allegations against Nixon. It has! "Many of you are presidents of __ been effectively reduced Ford said Mon- lack of Thc statement said the Hanoi ii i regime continues to ship "mas blistering Etalcmcnt blammR of Wiir malcrjc day in an address In the cerv Manufacturers of America. Colson Questioned'.' There were indications day the committee (Continued: I'aRi'H. Col. Today's Chuckle A politician is a man who says "Nice lo see you again, even if he has never seen you before. (.uwiuii1 el and thousands of their young progress in Ihe search for miss- men into Ihe South, both in obvi- iiul a Vietnam violation" of the Vietnam peace agreement. jyoiir iahorT "It seems clear that their sole! claimed North Viet- rying unsuccessfully to conquer .lie people of South Vietnam by jure military the cm- want a formal paring down so wry Manufacturers of America, thev will know what would you feel if youjing Americans t might he needed. lhc rn''I MonJm.-magoincnl negotiations .jpurpose continues to be to pro- si aff had i and some dissident stockholder! mote propaganda and to spread ugly, untrue and dishon- vent real said a se- esl rumors aboul you through- out your marketing "I don't think you'd like Ford lold Ihe grocery execu- tives. "And I can understand !Kissinger's disRusI with those, who behind his hack, spread F.tories clialleiiRiiiR his inlCRri- vrn-paRe statement issued by Ihe U. S. embassy. Walked Out A II. S. spokesman said Ihe slalemenl was issued after Communist delegations walked out of Saigon talks aimed at declaring mi armistice namese and South Viet- namese soldiers have been killed and 175.000 have been wounded on bolli sides since the rouse-fire was signed uary, 1973. in The South Vietnamese govern menl "has been ready for all Ilicft1 inonlhs lo make Ihe cease-fire effective Yet the North Vietnamese have con- tinued and stepped up their mil- oil June 7, but the delegations demanded guaran-i Skirting two of the most sensi- tees that they would not be however, HEW said U.S. security commitments." Leftist newspapers in Beirut (Continued: 1'aRe 3. Col. 5.) percd with again. i the rule's would not jeopardize jassy said. The Communists staged their walkout charging that the South Vietnamese and the Americans refused to discuss the question of the Viet Cong delegation's diplomatic privileges and im- munities. Demanded Guarantees The. Saigon government, sus- pended these privileges and im- munities in April, and the Com- munists boycotted the two-party Joint Military Commission and the four-party Joint Military Team in May. The privileges and immunities were restored The U. S said the Viet Cong: major, revenue-producing col-; and North Vietnam "dally sllorts such foolbil" andi fused lo discuss" the search '1IU'mPl lo (lcnl Index missing Americans. The document said that in the books- Middle East "there, is a real; Institutions found in violation desire of both parlies forcould lose their federal aid or but in South Vietnam j be sued by the justice deparl- ithe Communists apparently fear i menl. defeat in an election The regulations the problem of sexism in text-! Comics......... Crossword Daily Record Deaths Kdilorial Features Farm promised loj Financial "Apparently feariiiR defeat injconRress more than a year IIRO, Marion any fair political contest for the are open for public comment allegiance of the people of South Vietnam. (North Vietnam) is still trying unsuccessfully to until Oct. 15. An IIF.W official said they probably would not hi enforced to any great extent conquer the people of South j this coining school year, but in- V i e I n a in by pure would serve MS general Movies Society Sports Stale Television Want Ads ...I" ....17 .18 II ,H 1.1-15 II in-a the statement said. guidelines.   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 145+ million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

10 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 10 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 145 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 19 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication