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Cedar Rapids Gazette Newspaper Archive: May 31, 1974 - Page 10

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Publication: Cedar Rapids Gazette

Location: Cedar Rapids, Iowa

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   Cedar Rapids Gazette (Newspaper) - May 31, 1974, Cedar Rapids, Iowa                                10 iuo I n.oi i.u ualUii: ill.. Auy Jl. ISil White Neighbors Harass Woman By Joe 1-apointc UKTKOIT Hicdard sal behind her baard- cd living room window reading her hate mail. A member of Hie black Vietnam veterans group which has pledged to protect her family stood by "I'm afraid of ni> shadow." said the black mother six. whose West Side home has been the target of rocks, garbage and haras. mem since she moved into the previously all-white neigh- biirbood last summer. "They don't want handguns in this city, but I've got to get one In protect my home." she said, I.aiding her !l-month-old baby girl in her arms. Determined At first uncertain about whether to flee from the violence. Mrs. Kit-hard, whose children range up In HI years old. now says she is deter- mined to stay. "I've lived with white people all my life." she said. "My narenls were the second family in an Kast Side neighborhood they used to call 'Polish Town.' Two of ihi- Richard hoys played basketball nearby with several neighbors in sight of an unmarked police car. Police have been guarding her modest home around the clock since last week. .Mrs. Richard finally sought their help after a brick was thrown in her basement window. An Inscription tied to the brick read: "Go home nigger can yon dig ProU'tlion I'lcilse The Interested Veterans for l-'tonomie anil Social Progress moveil in Wednesday with a pledge of long-term prolcction. "We are trained in Hie arts and crafts of warfare." said KnhcM .lones, a spokesman for the group, which claims Michigan members. "We fought for Ibis country anil we. should be able to live wherever we please." Karlier this month the home was patrolled by union groups working with the NAAt'P. De- troit Police Commissioner Philip Tannian visited the home last week and told Mrs. iJichard to "hold on." Windows liroki-u Since she moved into the neighborhood last July.her windows have been broken, and fish and bottles have been thrown in her backyard. Last Xovembcr a car roared across her front lawn. One of the hate letters was decorated with a large American flag slicker and urged Mrs. liichurd to move "with your own kind, where you are want- ed." Another letter called Mrs. Kichard. who recently- separated from her husband, a cotton-pickin' kinky-haired ADC (a form of welfare) womair." "I've worked hard. 1 worked two jobs for four years." said Mrs. Kichard, a bunking agent. AP wircuholo Maytroit Richard, a mother of six, who is separated from her husband, surveys the damage at her West Side Detroit home Thursday. Her home has been the target of vandalism since she moved into a previously all-white neighborhood. Police have taken up round-the-clock protection after two labor unions provided protection for her following publicity of her plight. A group of Vietnam war veterans are also providing protection. a 'ear By Abigail Van Huron DEAR ABBY: Our dmightci .was married for only five weeks last year. The marriagi was annulled because her hus- band went back tn his boyfriend. (Yes. you read right. I said Our daughter then resumed her friendship with a fine young man she had known since childhood and they are planning to be married in -hiirch this summer. Should we send wedding in- vitations to our friends and relatives? I hesitate to do this because they already gave hoi one wedding gift. She didn't send the gifts back because she never got around to it. IX DOUBT DEAR IN: Invite whomever you want. The matter of a gift will he up to them. DEAR ABBY: Your advice about what to say when making a condolence call was par- ticularly timely for me. I recently went to the hospi- tal to have a baby I desperately wanted. I returned home with empty arms. Our precious baby was stillborn. Yon are right. Not everyone handles his grief in the same manner. Some find comfort in talking about it. Others do not. In my case. I was so crushed. 1 couldn't bring myself to talk about it. Sensing this, the friends who came to see me said only: "I'm sorry." All 1 could say was: "Thank von." please tell your readers that in circumstances like mine, the one thing friends say shouldn't is: "Don't feel so sad. You'll have another because I will never have this one again. EMPTY ARMS DEAR ABBY: Re con- dolences: Many, many years ago we lost our first child when lie was only a few months old. Of the many things written or said to me. I recall only one. then or now. Someone close said: "The only thing I can think of to say is that I love you." Reaffirmalion of one's love is important. MRS. A.M.K. THE W. (MI5LES TO NOTE ANNIVERSARY Mr. and Mrs. Glenn W. Ga- llic, IS40 Xika avenue NW, will celebrate their wedding anniversary Saturday with a receplion at St. Mark's Lutheran church from 2 to 5. Hosts for the event are the couple's children: Mrs. Richard Randall, Mrs. Gary Lorenzen and Dennis, all of Cedar Rapids. Mr. Gable and' Hid former Kvelyn Otelia Snrenscn were married ,1mm 4. Ill-Ill, in Walerville. Society for Women Features 'Having Done All, Stand" Woman's Vigil at Monument Ends By Steven W. Coll'ord PORTSMOUTH, Va. (UPI) With the stubborn deter- mination of her ancestors. Marian Ravvls fought a brave but futile battle to keep Ports- mouth's Confederate War monument decorated with four Confederate flags and a memorial wreath. Mrs. Rawls. an officer in the United Daughters of the Con- federacy's local chapter, said her six-hour vigil at the momument ended Thursday because she is a law and order advocate "and I didn't want to resist the police. I bowed to aiitlmrilv. "Since May 30 is really- Memorial day nut the' day the government said the (laughters voted last week to put flags around the monument as we'd done every other year." Mrs. Rawls said. Warning "Bill Tuesday, the city coun- cil, without talking to anybody, decided to lake them down. When I saw they planned to lake the flags down I told the city manager that those flags better not be touched. "If you take them down six limes I'll put them back seven limes." the voice teacher told city officials. Mrs. Rawls said she "borrowed" the Confederate flags from Hie Portsmouth Confederate cemetery grave sites. "At S o'clock this morn- ing I put them around the momimenl and then figured 1 better stay and do some gar- dening." The mi-foot monolith is MIA Officially Dead WEST HURLEY. N. Y. (AP) Seven years after he was shot down over North Vietnam. Air Force Major Vincent A. Scungio officially has been declared dead. His former wife. Helen, said the Pentagon's announcement Wednesday, which came on the birthday of the youngest of Iheir four children, was no surprise. But "you never really prepare 'yourself completely for she said. She is now Mrs. Robert Kintncr. She remarried five vears ago and lives in this Ul- ster county community with her new husband and her children by her previous marriage Audrey, 15; Pamela, 13; Vincent, jr.. 12, and Cheri, who turned II Wed- nesday. Scungio's F-1II5 plane, on which he was an electronic warfare officer, was shot down Nov. 4, Hlliti, a week after his Knd birthday. Bnlh lie and the pilot, who has never been icard from, were declared missing in action. Mrs. Kintner said she wait- ed, hopefully, for word of her husband's fate. But.by she said, she virtually gave up hoping. Military friends told her it was doubtful Scnugio had survived and after conducting her own investigation she sorrowfully agreed. Of her remarriage, she said. "I had four young children 1 couldn't live in Ihc grave, so- called. I had to live. I-had to brealhe. I had to have air, and they did loo." Nevertheless, she recalls, she and her children anxiously watched each televised return of POWs lasl year. "The first film on Hie POWs always came out at 4 in the morning. The children and I were always up then. It was a very emotional moment I guess I would have to say I finally gave up the last glimmer of hope when the lasl of the POWs canu'back." Despite official an- nouncement of their father's death, the children all want to continue wearing MIA (miss- ing in action) bracelets, Mrs. Kintner said. She called it a "beautiful gesture" and said. "We try to have them be proud of their father. They loved him very much." beautiful, frosli Tell her how much you care on your Anniversary. Send her favorite flowers. KREBS FLOWER SHOP 18th St. SW 363-2081 V surrounded by four life-size statues representing Ports- mouth Confederate dead. Disrespect "Why thai monument is more than Kill years'old. and some of Portsmouth's, best people modeled for it when they built it." Mrs. Rawls said. "We would be derelict in our duly if it were not decorated. "We were ceded that piece of land from the city, and it was always our task to care for it." said Mrs. Rawls. "Bui they told us it was the city's job to decide how to decorate it. "It would have been abject disrespect not to have decorat- ed it. especially since this is the real Memorial day Decoration day as it used to be called." Co-Patriot Mrs. Rawls, whose Civil war and Confederate ancestry dates to her grandfather's brother, said she didn't see herself as a martyr for a cause but just a "co-patriot." "I enjoyed seeing all those happy faces this morning, all those people who told me to hold my she said proudly. "Why even a Greyhound bus driver saluted me as he drove by. "If I've done anything, if I have taken a stand, it was merely an extension of the stand my ancestors look in nulling to this country and es- tablishing it." she said. "As St. Paul said, 'Having done all. stand'." Personalized Service1. FOR WOMEN DOWNTOWN 108 ie Tower TOWN COUNTRY Shopping Center Bridge Duplicate Bridge Mitchell movement winners in a game played Thursday at Koelritlge Park Christian church were: North-south Mrs. W. E. Eymau and Mrs. Karl llenrikson, first, and Mrs. Robert Butschi and Mrs. Richard Siewert, second; east- wesl Mrs. Richard Koenig and Mrs. Robert Vater. first, and Mrs. Bill Howard and Mrs. Shirley Moore, second. This was the- last game until Sep- tember. West Side Club Winners in a Mitchell movement game played Thursday at Welly-Way were: North-south Mrs. L. W. Busby and George Alberts, first, and Mrs. K. V. Harring- ton and Clyde Nowlin, second; east-west Mrs. Scott Denisun and Mrs. John Knodle. first, and William Hustings and Larry De Clue of Des Moines. second. The next game will be played at Sunday at Welly-Way. Cadeffe Conference Planned Saturday "Free To Be You and Me" is the Illume of the annual Caddie conference for Car- dinal council of Girl Scouts In be held Saturday al Hie YWCA. The conference's activities include a style show and workshops .on denim em- broidery, individual clothing design, skelching, general crafts, ecology, photography, ceramics, yoga and leather crafts. Lunch and swimming or volleyball are also planned. Rail Strike Costly By Myrun I.. Itdkinil DKI.III. India (Al'i Prime Minister Indira Gundlii's success ill crushing a national rail strike liavc more impact mi India's development tlian the explosion ol iis first nuclear device. The immediate domestic repercussions friini Ilic May IS nuclear tesi were limited In a liui'st "f ii.iliun.il iinilr anil a linnsl in llir prime minister's prestige. fro-Labor lurr Mrs. (iaiidlii's firm handling iif the rail strike marked a major departure from the traditional pro-labor polii-ifs of her Congress party which has ruled India since 11117. "The railway strike just ended ruuld mark a watershed in India's langlcd anil somewhat confused labor rela- wrote the Hindustan Times. "In a sense the railway strike was of the government's own making since it had for many years thrown its weight in favor of labor and against management irrespective of the nature of the demands or issues in question one here Mrs. (l.inilln turn pro-business lint the days of easy entices- sitms (o latior unions seem (o lie fading. Accusation George l-'eriiandes. the Soeialisl leader nf militant unions that unconditionally called off their 211-day strike, has accused the prime minister of plotting to "kill the labor movement." Mrs. Gandhi describes such statements as preposterous. She maintains her bard line toward the rail workers was dictated solely by economic realities that bar the govern- mi-ill from "continuing to give more and more when we have less and less." Her government arrested thousands of union activists, held back wages, evicted many strikers and their families from government apartments and used troops to man key rail installations. High Costs The economic loss to the cuuntrv because of the strike was -aid one interna- tional labor lull Hie cost in term-, ol end libcitii-. was even (uglier Mis Gandhi's dclcndcls ar- gue that (lie liail I" do everything I" break the strike anil economic bankruptcy Kill the rail workers return- In their HIS an- diner, and Ihere are fears llml they may pose a walor threat In Hie railways at wnrk than wln-ii they were on strike. "The country's ha-ic economic difficulties, of infla- tion, of disparities in the wage structure, remained unre- solved." said one Western ob- server. The government's most pressing problem today is gel- ling enough wheat and rice into subsidised government shops for the poor. Procurement of the sprint; wheat crop has fallen behind schedule because, officials say. farmers and private dealers arc hoard- ing the crop until prices go up. Labor lenders say Mrs. Candid should be as tough on the hoarders as she was on the rail workois C.R. Recitals Are Planned On Sunday Two piano and organ recitals will be presented Sunday al Ililtbrunner Music Co. by students of Mary Jo Volroubek of Mary Jo's Piano and Organ Studio. Students participating at are: Tina Ruth, Daniel Osborn, Tari Pl'ilTnor. Jeff Nassif. Sandy Rapp. Laurie Kahler, linth O'Brien, Gene Nassif, Ann Rapp, Jim Jensen. Nancy Ferguson. Sally O'Brien, Diane Ingram, Brenda Dougherty, Kalhy Buresli and Pally O'Brien. Students performing at -I are: Jannu Weir, Tami and Eric Wax bom, Karie Lynn and Dennis Grove, Mall and Jason Jogart, Anthea Harrison, Jenise Schonberg, Lisa Max- well, Pally Grahek, Donna and Engholm, Mary Vamlewallo. Sarah Bennett. Meyocks and Karla Kar- Also, Sunday, piano students if Mrs. John E. Charlson, Miami drive NE. vVill present wo recitals at St. Paul's Unit- L'd Methodist church. Participating at 2-will be: Jsa Palricia Simon. Jeea Gailfus. Kalhy Bey, lolene Schumacher. Ann lulchinson, Jill v'ai'cn Jacobson. Jeri and Kim atka, Ellen England, Kay Seery. Ann Nemec. Julie Davidson, Cheryl and Jim David Johnston, llavlik. David Unwell, Susie Pfust, Jill Roesch and Mice Widmer. Appearing al :i will be: Lisa, ind Carol Grondahl, Francine '.ray, Julie Hupp. Kelly Walker. Kelly O'Brien. Michael Barnes. Karie and 'I Clemmens, Sarah Sears, lulie Erickson. Theresa Vidmer, Mike and Jim Slat- cry, Tom Lislcbarger, and Lisa Sawyer, Kellie Grove. Caron Studker, Amy Salmon, 'an] Bollon, Roberta Wilson. David Howell, Jill Roesch and Mice Widmer. ON THIS DATE in HIM. top diplomatic and nililary officials met in lonolulu to discuss ways of neeting the Cnmmtniist threat n Southeast Asia. The Pant Dress 16 Our most popular panl dross...machine washable Dacron polyester and cof- ton blonds. Ploatfronl styl- ing with concealed zipper, optional bell at the woisl. Choose yours now while selection h complete. Sizes 10 to 18 in assorted pat- terns and styles. Cotton Shop Second Floor Golf Squaw Creek Mrs. Jerry Ilowell was hos- tess at Wednesday's event. Medalist for 18 holes was Mrs. Lelantl Burns and cham- pionship flight winner for IS holes was Mrs. David Johnson. Kiohard Spaeek was medalist for II hole play. Flight winners for holes were: Mrs. Frank Frajman, presidential; Mrs. Larry Snodgrass. A; Mrs. .1. P Flynn. B; Mrs. Don Lunsden, C: and Mrs. Larry Long, no handicap. Junior girls golf will start June 10 at Fur more information, call Mrs. Del Roth, 377-5252, or Mrs. Snodgrass, Twin Pines Medalists in the event Wed- nesday were Mrs. George Tschctschot and Mrs. A. A. Griffin, lloslessess were Mrs. John Hank and Mrs. Robert North. Thirty-four golfers par- ticipated. Flight winners were: Mrs. Tom Merryman and Mrs. L. W. Hacrther, championship; Mrs. Don Terrace, presiden- tial; Mrs. Otto Wiedersberg. A; Mrs. Alvin Burns, B; Mrs. Jim Hedges. I1, and Mrs. K. .1. Kadlec, Mrs. Len Helming won the day's prize and an approach was sunk by Mrs. Hedges. The first twilight golf league for couples is planned Sunday at 3 followed by a picnic at the Harbor View pavilion in Ellis park. Members should take ta- ble service and meat. For further information, call Mrs. Bert Hoffman, Elmerest Seventy-one players par- ticipated Wednesday. Mrs. Kobert Young was IS hole medalist. Flight winners in 18 hole play were: Mrs. Young, championship; Mrs. Kobert Smith. A, mid Mrs. N'orman Kessler. B. Medalist for hole play was Mrs. Bert Katz and flight winners were: Mrs. Kalx, championship: Mrs. .1. E. DaiiuTuii. A: Mrs. Harold Siivern, B; Mrs. John Peterson, C. and Mrs. William Hayes, D. Approaches were sunk by Mrs. Young, Mrs. Robert Condon and Mrs. Robert M. L. John- son. SATISFACTION GUARANTEED All ages: Babies, children and adults One sitting per subject Additional or individuals in same tamily per subject No from finished professional portraits selection) You may select additional portraits offered at low prices NO HANDLING CHARGE IUCW WED THUR. FRI. HIKl 29 30 31 Photographer on duty SUN. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. KMART EAST ONLY 180 COLLINS RD. N.E.   

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