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Cedar Rapids Gazette: Monday, May 27, 1974 - Page 2

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   Cedar Rapids Gazette (Newspaper) - May 27, 1974, Cedar Rapids, Iowa                                 Weather—  ('hance at /showers tonight aud Tuesday. I,ow tonight in middle 50s. High Tuesday ii p p e r  liOs.  VOLUME 92 NU MB KH l.m  LO  jWdtte  up id a  CITY  FINAL  IO CENTS  ( KUAR RAPIDS, IOWA, MONDAY, MAY 2V, 1974  ASSOCIATED PRESS, UPI, NEW YORK TIMES  SYRIA  Arrest Top Ford Stands Against  Thieu Aide  Nlxon on Tape Debafe   *■ ™    W    I IA Mill IWV f 'nun I ADN    nninl    thrnnnh hic nllnrnniic  In Spy Plot  SAIGON (AP) — President Thieu’s assistant for political affairs and one of his most trusted aides has been arrested as part of an alleged Communist espionage ring, government sources said Monday.  Nguyen Van Ngan, 40, began; his career with Thieu as a legal adviser to the armed forces in I  DANBURY, Conn. (AP) Vice-president Ford has made clear he plans to stand by his disapproval of President Nixon’s decision to bar further Watergate evidence to the house impeachment inquiry.  Ford told a news conference tapes, here Sunday night that their differences were laid out “quite candidly” at his meeting with  point, through his attorneys, has taken a different view,” said Ford, who has repeatedly urged the White House to cooperate with the house judiciary committee as much as possible. “Any relevant information, j transcripts, other docu-1 ments — relating to impeach able offenses — I think should be made available,” he said. “I  Nixon last Thursday and that do not think that the White  “I haven’t hacked off from it  since.”  Is and Will Be  1964. There was no official gov-j He refused to say what Nix-ernment announcement of his on’s reaction to his position was arrest.    but said, “there was an under-  M cd ira I Supplies    standing that my position had  Sources said Ngan owns sev  eral business firms in Saigon, and that he is suspected of aiding the Viet Cong financially and arranging to transfer medical supplies to them.  Some sources compared the arrest to the recent West German case in which a top aide to Chancellor Willy Brandt was arrested and charged with spying for the East Germans.  But others noted that there recently has been a power struggle in the presidential palace between a political faction led by Ngan and another led (the bv Hoang Due Nha, the 32-year-old minister of information and an adopted nephew of Thieu. These sources speculated that Ngan’s ouster and the charges against him could be part of a political power play.  It was the second alleged spy ring uncovered in the palace in the last five years, sources said Another of Thieu’s former special assistants, Huynh Van Trong, who handled political intelligence, and 42 others were I arrested in 1969.  been, is and will be what it has been in the past.  “Only the President, at this  Three-Fourths Believe Nixon Guilty: Gallup  PRINCETON, NJ. (AP) -Nearly three-fourths of the country believes President Nixon was involved in the Watergate bugging or cover-up, according to the latest Gallup poll. However, percentage has increased  only slightly in three months.  Seventy-three percent of the 1,543 adults interviewed May 10-13 said they believed the President had been involved to some extent in the scandal. The survey was taken aftej- the White House transcripts were released April 30.  Similar surveys showed 71 percent held the same opinion last February and 67 percent held it last June.  In all three surveys, those polled were asked to select one of  House Arrest     t * le  following statements to  match their views:  One source said Ngan is un- Nixon planned the Wategate der house arrest, but his where- j bugging f r0 m the beginning: abouts could not he immediate-! Nixon did not plan the hugging ly determined. Sources said  but knew  about it before it took Ngan’s bank accounts were fro-1 pi ace;   zen and his property confiscate Nixon found out about the bug-   ed     ging after it occurred, but tried  Ngan, a diminutive lawyer,  joined the Viet Mirth, predeces-  House doors ought to be opened for all the snoopers — and some of them are — to go in there and ransack the White House.”  The vice-president made it plain he intends to keep pushing for moderation, compromise and cooperation with the committee.  Ford sounded that theme at I several points Sunday as he spoke at a hospital building dedication in New York and I campaigned in Connecticut for freshman Republican Rep. Ronald A. Sarasin, who faces a difficult re-election fight in his normally Democratic district.  “Compromise”  Ford said he would do his best to assure enactment of compromise health insurance legislation, adding that “cooperation and compromise are the only means by which our form of government — in this field and others — can move ahead successfully.”  He then flew to Waterbury, Conn., where he dedicated a new airport instrument landing system and declared that “cooperation and teamwork gets things done.”  At the Danbury press conference, his first since he was I summoned to the 45 - minute meeting with Nixon last Thurs-; day, Ford was asked whether the President had sought a modification in his position on providing further material to the impeacnment inquiry.  Giscard Signs In  China Trip Was Not as Hoped: Ray  DAMASCUS (AP) — Syria publicly criticized Secretary of (State Kissinger Monday and hinted at new negotiating troubles as Kissinger resumed talks i with President Hafez Assad.  An official statement from the Syrian Arab News Agency charged Kissinger with injecting the issue of Palestinian guerillas into the talks on an Ifraeli-Syrian disengagement on the Golan Heights.  “Waste of Time”  “He who wants to discuss this subject must solve the Palestinian problem and discuss this issue with the Palestinian leadership,” the statement said. “Any other attempt is only a waste of time.”  The statement said the Palestinian matter was only one of several “difficult points” remaining in the negotiations, but did not elaborate. There were reports Sunday night of a new snag in the negotiations con-j cerning the buffer zone between i Israeli and Syrian forces.  Kissinger conferred with Assad in the presidential palace | for 5% hours until 2:30 a.m.  I Monday. The talks started again [after the two men had a few ! hours to rest.  Meanwhile, an announcement jin Moscow that Soviet Foreign Minister Andrei A. Gromyko was flying to Damascus Monday i added another uncertain ele-iment to Kissinger’s 30-day peace mission. The Soviet news agency Tats revealed the visit,  LOS    ANGELES    (AP)    —    The! Schwartz    said    a    claim    of    mg    the    authorities.    I    am    sure  sa y* n f> he was coming at the  father    of    a    Symbionese    Libera direct    contact    with the    trio was    that    if    Emily    says    I    am    to    meet invitation of the leadership of  tion Army member has given up;    ,  . ,    .     t     .    . ,. someone he identified as an in-!that.  a week-long vig.I to contact Ins : t( , rmediary He sajd wcnt t0   leaving for home  UPI Telephoto  Valery Giscard d'Esiaing signs the constitutional document confirming his election as the 20th president of France during inauguration ceremonies Monday at the Elysee presidential palace in Paris. Behind him are Alain Poher (left), who was interim president since the death of Georges Pompidou April 2, and Prime Minister Pierre Messmer.  SLA Father Drops Effort  made in two telephone calls by her alone, the FBI will respective Syrian Arab Republic.  rkt-c    »r. -    ,    ,    ,    .    .    .    i someone he identified as an in- that.”    Syrian    sources,    however,    said  ..Th jiff     h      DLS    M0INES    {M    )     -     Gov | a    wet * k ‘ lon 8    vigil    to    contact    his| tcrmediary Hc said }w wpnt t0 H(?  ^    ^  before the meeUn«^ S he X LaW  Kobert ltay ’  who returned Sun ‘  dau * h ' cr \  lcavlng for homc : an  appointed place in (he Los Emily or Bdl or Patty It was laid nut mille randirilvI da Y ^ roni an 1,_ day  tn P to Vc utter saying he considered her Angeles arca on Friday, but ar-  0 nlv three people in the worldly, .    ■    .     v   It was laid out quite candidly|_  SJ    rived an hour late because of m talk to - came to me at  Grom y ko was com,n *  b ‘ ,ck 011   I home tonight and said to meet  tbe  st a 8 c   , he apparently was coming without an invitation and U.S. officials declined to indicate why  tho  during the meeting, and I have  Peo P !e ’s Republic of China, said and her comrades criminals, not backed off from it since.” prospects for selling Iowa ag-! Frederick Schwartz left for Ford also said he expects ricultural products to the Chi- his subui ban Chicago home Sun-  to cover it up;    I    Nixon will obey any supreme  nese mav no ,  bp as C(Mk1 as h(l   ;-;-  Nixon had no knowledged the court decision in the case in- Iii    (Story    on Patty Hear st s ap-  nopea.    [parent    conversion    on    pa    go  “Scoured Area"  No one met him that  sors of tho Communist Vici bugging and spoke up as soon as volving special Watergate prosing, at the age of 12. When he!he learned about it.    ecutor    Leon    Jaworski’s    sub  poena of 64 tapes.  15.)  was 18, he was jailed by    the    A breakdown of the latest sur-  Viet Minh for three    years    on    vey shows that 8 percent    be-  spying charges.    lieved the President planned    the  In Thieu’s cabinet,    he held    breakin, 26 percent said    he  the official title of special pres-[knew about it, 39 percent    said    he  idential assistant in charge of    covered    it up, 14 percent    said    he  liaison with constitutional agen-    had no    knowledge of it    and    13  aes and political parties.    percent    gave no opinion.  At a press conference Mon-  Watergate-reiated I day, Ray said details of a pro-   ;  -—  5 il-u j j    r    jay after fruitless, tearful pleas  ■posed soybean exchange be-     (0 ‘ hjs daughler , Emily Harris    .  More    Pressure    tween scientists in China and at    her husband. Bill, and Patricia    Then    he    reported  It    was felt in Washington    that    iowa State university in Ames    Hearst to .surrender. Schwartz    authorities,  the    j    u d ic i    a r y committee    I are being left to the U. S. state    said an intermediary claimed to  may step up pressure on the denartment White House this week to pro-J  The  governor  freeway traffic.     _    ___________  tomorrow at Hollywood and    Share Spotlight  d Vine, Id be there.    j    observers    speculated    that  on Saturday when. Schwartz    Van    Stopped    Gromyko,    who    '^t    "jet    with  said. "I did more than appear .Meanwhile, the search for the  lssln 8er ay    .hare  at the appointed place. I literal- three continued. A yellow van ,     a     settlement    was  Iv scoured the area, making was stopped Sunday near Santa     6  . ... „  cnM .  m „ n t  if    *. *    „ ... ®    ,    ,    .     tni f    ..    ..    at    hand or to block a settlement  myself as visible as possible. Barbara, about IOO miles north “ . .    .     tn   Uh' calls to of Us Angeles. Police released! he Soviets consider contrary to the male and female occupants 1 ,helr ln,cres,s -  Simon: Balance Budget To Curtail Inflation  “If it was a hoax, it was a  ap er questioning, saying they have made direct contact with    cruel    hoax,”    he said     wer c satisfied they    had    no SLA  the three, but said two meetings    j “j    will    never again work    connection.  I vide    ‘he subpoenaed tapes and j    ^    3" his    attempts    to    make i    , ?{”. , him  ,    through    intermediaries.” hej ^ r,t ^ s     had'ui”  [evidence.    L.«nta#.«    nnH    nv,.hunrm idnuc    ami (daughter failed to materialize.     said     ‘-And    I will not work en-    ut cause tne>    said    tnt y    Had in  Schwartz, a consulting engi-jtirely on my own without advis- (Continued: Page 3, Col. 5.)  said that in  WASHINGTON (AP) - Trea-|graduating students at sury Secretary Simon says the government should aim toward a balanced budget in 1976 as a key to controlling the nation’s “totally unacceptable” inflation rate.   u  ...    ,    .contact    and    exchange    ideas    and  despite Nixons apparent de-(materials with the Chinese he cision Saturday to provide the  had nttlc  , U( . k  panel with access to his income  tax records, committee mein- “Ihey dont say no — they hers are still angry over his'  iust  don’t  answe r > ou *”  Ka y I stand on the tapes. They may Illinois,take action, in the form of ei-  college in Jacksonville, III. ther more subpoenas or a cita-He said inflation could be dc-1 tion for noncompliance, if hi 1  feated, but not easily. He called (continues to deny them the evi-upon congress to exercise fiscal donee they need responsibility, and said “the Most of the impeachment federal budget has to be hail-panel’s 38 members were away  said.  He said he was unable to give  ricer, had said publicly he would walk “hand in hand” to a safe surrender with the Harrises and Miss Hearst if they would only contact him  Inflation cannot he contained    I died more responsibly than    iii    from the capital during the long  in the long run unless there is    the past.”    Memorial day weekend when  control over government spend- Simon, who succeeded George the break came in the tax mating, Simon said in an interview. I Shultz as treasury secretary | ter. Press Secretary Ziegler anile added that the federal  oarlier t,us mont ^*  sa 'd he had bounced from the Florida White budget has been iii deficit for 14     1,0  * bo| d  n(,yv     program” to con-    House that Nixon had ordered  of the last 15 \ears and “we     ,ro * inflation.    He indicated    he    his lawyers to work out with  have to get back to tile old time  a set of 120-million -year -old Iowa fossils to an expert in Nanking and was linable to make contact with the mother of an Iowa State university professor who lives in Peking.  Ray said the Chinese may not be as interested in Iowa agricultural products as he had hoped because that country is largely self-sufficient in food  “Fugitives”  However, he told  Columnist Stewart Alsop Dies of Pneumonia at 60  stuffs. But lie is trying to build  un airport  news conference before leaving:  “Emily and Bill Harris and Patricia Hearst are in my view criminals, at least in the sense that they are fugitives.’’  The three, said by agent to bo the last sought as members of the tor rorist SLA, are wanted on st att 1  2(K) of charges of robbery, assault with in the  WASHINGTON (AP) - Col-!there umnist and author .Stewart  (>st  Alsop, a leukemia victim who once wrote that resisting death is both futile and wrong, is dead in FBI of pneumonia He was 60. persons; Alsop, who with his brother, Joseph, was syndicated in nearly  U.S. officials said Kissinger would return to Israel by Monday night or early Tuesday, and then end his peace mission whether or not a settlement is reached.  But some observers were skeptical that Kissinger would abide by his own timetable since on previous occasions he has ignored his own deadlines when it appeared im agreement was near.  On the military front, the  round" of 0 treatment^ ’for,?)™" command reported fresh  fighting with Israeli forces on Mt. Hermon and the Golan  (Continued Page 3. Col fi.)  two weeks ago tor his lat-  acute myeloblastic leukemia, a rare cancer of the blood-producing bone marrow.  The pneumonia was described as a byproduct of the cancer, which the veteran writer of the Washington political scene had  religion of spending what we take in this country.”  Simon said that “having budget deficits is wrong ...”  Burns Sees Threat  Meanwhile, Arthur Burns, chairman of the Federal Reserve Board, said Sunday that | d j continued inflation at  ,lw ‘ l   (Continued: Page 3, Col. 3  (Continued Page 3. Col. 6  (Continued  that China I  a dond j v  weapon and kidnaping.! hospital at the National gram 'p| 10v a j >so are accust , d 0 f federal tides of Health in nearby firearms violations  the nations newspapers suffered from for three years 1960s. died Sunday in a  Militant Unions End ?Q-D?y Indian Strike  up a Page3,Col. I.)  esda, Mi  ii  e was  Instinct h-admitted  President Points to Achievement of Peace  the last time in Viet  lh® this  present rate could place “the fu |exists for lasting pean  lure of our country iii jeo- ,    »    .    ,,   J  'n a nationwide radio Marion  oi our country iii Purdy.”  “II long continued, inflation at anything like the present rate would threaten the very foundations of our society,” Burns told  lo (Iii a's I Ii od* Ic  The trouble with some |eo pie who don't have much to say is that you have to listen so long to I md that out.  Coi»vflahl  KEY BISCAYNE, Flu (UPI)    iii negotiation instead of armed    century  President Nixon, warning    confrontation,” he added    nam  (gainst isolationism, said Mon-    u e  p a j d  tribute to Americans    “Only    today, for the first    time  ly that for the first time in    who have given their lives iii    iii this century,    do we    live    in    a  century “a real chance wars dating back to Valley time when, thanks to past sacri  Forge and said, “It should in-)flees, spire us with a determination to addrifvs, delivered from keep America great and tree by on vain hopes and good mien  He said there are some people responsibilities for world leader-in America “who would like to ship, would, in the long run. be turn inward and away from the disastrous, not for only us, but world's problems,” who believe for all the people iii the world America has enough problems, who seek peace “  a real chance exists for own without intervening in isling peace peace built not iothers  Writing about his fight with  the disease last year in his hook, “A Stay of Execution: A Sort of Memoir,” Alsop said,  “A dying man needs to die, as a sleepy man needs to sleep, and there comes a time when it is wrong, as well as useless, to resist.”  Despite the illness, Alsop ended unilaterally, continued writing until his death a weekly column in Newsweek magazine.  In Key Biscayne, President Nixon said Alsop’s “hard, val-  NEW DELHI (AP) — India’s militant rail unions Monday called off their 20-day-old strike in a major victory for Prime Minister Indira Gandhi.  Officials of the Action Committee representing the striking unions said Mrs. Gandhi’s government had granted no concessions and that the walkout was  ai day  the Florida White House, Nixon keeping America safe said. “In 1974 our hopes for a strong in our own time, tin lasting peace are brighter than at any time in living memory because we now have a structure of peace aud we are carefully working to strengthen it  “Settle Peacefully”  and Bons, hut on solid realistic time!grounds '     (The President's    Memorial      (/civ proclamation ,    is on fhige      25.)  •    I t     A momentum has lieen  of unique destiny and opportunity.”  Nixon said Americans wert created that makes it easier tm aahed away to war “under try- a w a re ne ss the lenders of the major powers ing and sometimes hitter cir paredness, and to settle differences peacefully,Ieumstanccs” four limes in this iwth physics  ' In Jeopardy”  He urged that peace not lie taken for granted and said that when this happens “its survival in iii jeopardy ”  ‘‘Lasting peace can bt' achieved only through lasting lasting pre-asting strength,(parts and moral.”  “Today, America’s isolation can only lead to the world's depot he said America must struction.” he said    »ant struggle against cancer has  continue to he a part of a larger    , . m .,L ..•••    ended at last, but his life and  world.    a    i « t    ^  wr j bn ^ s w jjj  mna j n a s t an .  “We may seek to ignore thei stressed that tile Atlantic  dard  f or b j s  profession for years world,” he said, “but the world Alliance is the cornerstone ol to come.” will not ignore us,”    the nation s foreign policy and Newsweek    Editor Osborne El-  Apparently referring to in l )0 ‘ n R'd  ()Llt p  ^  rob ‘  as a ] liott described Alsop as an India's detonation of a nuclear I ‘>-accmake in explosive areas. spiration to his colleagues and device, the President said in  a 'bke the Middle East    friends. “Like those who knew  day when atomic weapons are spreading, when famine stalks parts of the earth and whcn; ,,ve  > oars  wnne ne aas oven.  we u  — a s a man of intelligence of the world are a tinder-; 1re8 ‘d (, nt but said such policies  mid  grace and fairness and  (Continued. Page 3. Col. 3.)  Today s Index  ii.  tmx, “to turn our backs on our  e said the U.S. has had dip- stew as a friend, his many lomatic successes iii the last  readers a | s0  came to know him five Years while he has been  courage,” he said     Comics    . 21      Crossword    24      Dally Record    .....3      Deaths    .3      Editorial Features    . 6      Farm    ..... 17      Financial    . 25      Marion    . 25      Movies    .....SS      Society    10-13      Shirts    19-22      State    8. 9      Television    14      Want Ads    26-33      

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