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Cedar Rapids Gazette Newspaper Archive: May 15, 1974 - Page 9

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Publication: Cedar Rapids Gazette

Location: Cedar Rapids, Iowa

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   Cedar Rapids Gazette (Newspaper) - May 15, 1974, Cedar Rapids, Iowa                                Businessman, Teacher Offer Differing Opinions on Japan Hay's drug store, Forty-second trect anil Center Point road 'IE, on Kcb. 9 using a prcscrip- ion from the office of Dr, fylcr. By Sieve llcllc 'IVo differing views on mod- ern Japan were put forward this week in Eastern Iowa. Kiyoshi Togasaki, 79, funner president of the Japan Times in Tokyo, offered his impressions on Japan's women, labor unions and booming economy during an interview while in Cedar Rapids for a Rotary club COth anniversary luncheon. Togasaki, also a past pres- ident of notary International, cited the equality of women "in government, industry and even in the judicial branch" of Japan. The San Frandaco-born Japanese business leader point- ed to the guarantee of parity for women in the Japanese con- stitution (written shortly after World war II largely by Ameri- He added that women's liberation groups are very ac- tive and growing constantly in Japan. Thomas Mesner, University of Iowa professor of Japanese his- tory, disagreed with Togasaki's stand in a separate interview. He admitted the existence of women's organizations in Japan, but stated the Japanese concept of women's lib groups is and together for the buying of ood and the like." Mesner, who returned to the U.S. last August after a threc- stay in Japan, said the losition of women is improving n that country, "but it is nolh- ng like Ihcir situation in the U.S. although even the U.S. is slow." (Continued from Page 1.) what he termed "special in- terest groups" like the Amana Society and the business firms, which will not have to give up any land for the con- struction. He added that highway 149 is now an "excellent road" since repaying and. adequate to cover the average amount of traffic in the area. He stat- ed the recent addition of In- terstate 380' from Iowa City to Cedar Rapids has diverted much traffic that in the past might have used roads in the Amana area. Though admitting he and his clients are concerned with the loss of land, Pundt pointed; out the cost of the project (to taxpayers) is set at million., Repaying of present county road W21, along which the" proposed road would run, will amount to only he said. He claimed "a vast majori- ty of the people affected" favor this alternative to a new highway. Pundt also said that since the commission liad agreed to defer 510.8 million in road construction this year in an economy .measure, this project .would be a good one to forget. Confusion During the discussion Tues- day, Vice-chairman Stephen Garst said he felt the busi- nesses which built a "multi- million dollar complex" along interstate 80 due to proposals by the commission for. road improvement in the area should be considered. Commission member David Shaff responded by saying this was not the "best reason I've heard to approve the project" and suggested the delay. He continued by saying much confusion had resulted from the various Amana road projects proposed and that more study should be done. In announcing the deferral, Chairman Robert Rigler prom- ised a decision will be made in the "general public good." lifferent than the American Cooperatives "Women's groups are mostly c o n o IIH e said cooperatives in Mesner. "They Togasaki mions arc said "activities very extensive Japan." He chose the recent 31 icrccnt salary increase spurred >y the public servants organiza- ion as an example of increased abor might. But Mesner tempered Togasa- ci's claim by pointing out that 'unions are most powerful in lublic transportation, where the il percent increase was given. This is understandable because employers have lagged behind remendously in this area in jiving salary increases." "Lack Clout" But labor unions on the whole ack much clout and vary widc- y from American unions, ac- cording to Mesner. "Manage- ment and labor are quite often n the same he said. The vice-president of Kyoto 3rpadcasting Corp. was pres- ident of that company's union in 1972-73. "Unions are formed for the most part .within a company. :t's not like the United Auto Workers, where you have workers from different compa- nies in the same union. There is more of an attitude that workers should all unite as a family. :It's all very he added. "And salaries have been increasing largely due to the management's attitude of hav ing to take care of its except in the: area of transpor- tation where wildcat strikes have been widespread." Mutual Benefit- In the area of economy, Toga said declared, "There has been much benefit for both countries from the tremendous trade be- tween the U.S. and Japan "There has been a great de- mand for soybeans and wheat from this area, for example. There is a great demand in Japan for wheat products, due in part to the changing diet habits." Mesner agreed, adding tlia toast has "really caught on big with Japanese housewives." Only 17 percent of Japanese land is arable, according to To gasaki. Not only must Japan import food, but the country depends almost entirely on out side resources such as petrole urn, bauxite, and iron ore, hi said. "Our only resources an human and what the see said Togasaki. Trade Explanation This dependence on othei countries explains why one-thirc of Japan's trade is with the U.S The U.S. oil embargo of 194' (partly responsible for the Japa nese declaration of war on tin U.S.) and the "Nixon shocks" o 1971 (ten percent tariff on Japa nese imports) affected the country's economy intensely. Togasaki maintained the 'Nixon shocks" were "part of but Mesner noted that 'Hie people were still suffering ram them when I left in Au- gust." The Japanese recognition of iiainland China with its ensuing etcrioration of relations with 'aiwan "was a very unfortu- nate according to Toga- aki. Trade Balance Togasaki explained that there vas billion in trade last year jclwcon Japan anri mainland Jhina, but there was billion iclwcen Japan and Taiwan 'which is nothing for a busi- lessman to sneeze at." lie added, "From a business man's standpoint, il would seem cnselcss to me to ignore Tai van." Togasaki praised the many oint ventures between Amcri :an and Japanese firms am noted that there was a nev rend in the world today. "This is a new economica he said. "We live in a lay when you have to talk in 'lobal terms." (Continued from Page 1.) made earlier'tollc'lnson by the J ing, could be closed until he could sell it. Billboards Assault Charge Is i !on utilities in tins town. We put more into the buildings. j Atchison had turned down the j We spent on the marina offer, citing vandalism in.docks. We paid in Me docked here last year. We just now finished putting up a series of billboards in Illinois and Wis- consin urging people to come to McGregor this year. "We provide a car for people The Cedar Rapids 9A Gazette: Wed., May 15, 1971 swiped the radiator and battery from it. "I have had it with some of to use to get from our docks the people in this town. I feel U r ii verbal oiler, citing vandalism in. UOCKS. we pam m Me-downtown to McGregor to buy j like I've done a lot for the (own Dy of property I -irt-ior wr insurance. Seventy! things. You know what hap- land been treated pretty shabbi- A of assault and and pointed out that were kept permanently ipencd to it. The kids here'ly in (cry against lloberl Fisher, jivliioiifjiit it would increase if no address, was dismissed Tues-i boats wire further away from day in magistrate's court business. request of the complaining: TWO Options i lie was charged with reached the deci-i b Thursday after being told {by Cily Allomey Ton: Miller the; cily has two options in the mal-i jter. I Man Is Dismissed! !'e'Tn ,ilhe I street entirely and not allow A charge of possession of con-; boats to park on it at all or it trolled substance against David i could close part of the street Smith, Coggon, was dismissed and deal with Atchison to lease Monday in magistrate's remainder for boat parking, on a motion of the state. j He was charged with posses- ing Martin Andreas April 1. Drug Charge Against sion of marijuana March 25. Fairfax Man Faces Fire Safety At thai point Fire Chief Bob Hammel urged the street be rc- opened for reasons of fire safe- Drunk Drivinq Charge! Ronald Scheffert, Fairfax, waived a preliminary hearingj last week in magistrate's court1 and was bound over to the grand jury on a charge of sec- ond offense drunk driving. He was arrested April 26. ceivcd Magistrate Court Assault Charge To Grand Jury Jack Stevens, 504 Fifth aVe- nue SE, was bound over to the grand jury following a prelimi- lary hearing last week in mag- strate's court on a charge of assault with intent to murder. He is charged with assaulting Joseph Williams March G." William Kirk Bound Over to Grand Jury William Kirk, 1432 Third ave- nue SE, appeared in magis- trate's court on two charges lasl week. He was bound over to the grand jury following a prelimi- nary hearing on. a charge of at- tempted breaking and entering. He is .charged' in connection with the attempted breakin April 24 at the residence of Mrs Walter Moscrip, 901 South Eleventh street, Marion. A charge of breaking and en- tering was dismissed following a preliminary hearing. He was charged in connection with an April 24 breakin at the residence of Carol Waters, Jan ice Witt and Connie Rusk, 901 South Eleventh street, Marion. Representatives of two busin- esses reported to police Tuesday he loss of quantities of meat it ireakins. Forty-five boxes containing pounds of lean beef valued at were taken between last Wednesday and Thursday from Nevo Meat Co., Inc., 2727 Twelfth street SW. Fifteen-pounds of meal valued at S15 and 30 pounds of ice cream valued.at were taken Monday night or Tuesday morn- ing from the Dairy Queen drive- in, 2100 Sixth street SW. Marion Man Receives Suspended Sentence Randall Blakley, 1623 Ninth avenue, Marion, pled guilty last week in magistrate's court to an amended charge of larceny less and was given a 30-day suspended jailsentence. He was charged with breaking and entering in connection witf the April 1 breakin at the Car son Grain Co., Troy Mills. Man Pleads Guilty; Sentence Deferred Dan-ell Smith, 1299 Staub court NE, pled guilty Tuesday in magistrate's court to a charge of attempting to obtain prescrip lion drugs. Sentencing was de ferred until May He was charged with attempt- ing to obtain Pircodan from 3 54 sens of for tta bmo Drapery Dept., 2nd Floor Open Thursday 9 -'fiS o and Save off Casement Draperies and Bed Rests "Sky Top" CASEMENT DRAPERIES Vi off regular NOW regular NOW regular NOW regular NOW regular NOW o large selection .of draperies, in many and patterns all Vi CORDUROY ARMRESTS and CONTOURS Vz off Armrests, reg. Contours, reg. Envoy to Sweden WASHINGTON (AP) Rob- ert Strausz-Hupe has been sworn in as the new U. S. envoj to Sweden, a been unfilled years. post which for almost two council previously a petition from Vards and Mrs. Kcrstcn about nfringements on their properly >y Atchison's boats. A special meeting on (he prob- em was held April 22, including in inspection of the site, but the city delayed action at that lime, saying it needed to seek legal opinions on its options. When informed of Ihe city's for voting to re-open the entire street and allow him nothing for boat parking, Atchi- son replied: 'Can't Understand' "I can't understand why he (the fire chief) is now so con- cerned aboutr fire safety in this area. He didn't express such concern that I ever heard when he used to work down here." Alchison claimed he had re- ceived unfair treatment from the city ever since he started his business here restoring an old creamery building across from Triangle park at a cost ol several hundred thousand dol- lars. He repeated that McGregor Mississippi Marine, which At- chison said had a payroll last year of employed 29 people, paid in sales taxes lo the town and brough more than 800 visiting boater; to the town through Ht advertis Seagram's 7 Crown Half-gallon, it's America's favorite. SEAGRAM QISllUtRS CO.. AMERICAN PROOF. SMULEKOFP! Open Thyrsdaf a.m. to S p.m. Smulekoff s is Remodeling and that means we are in a topsy-turvy mess. 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Example 3 Regular Dense, long wearing carpet with foam back. Select from spring, melon, deep gold. Example 6 Regular The ideal carpet for "Rec" room, kitchen, etc. Foam backing. Choose from green, blue, brown. Example 9 Regular Carved Pattern Very heavy. 100% Kodel pile carpet. Choice of bright green or mist. S Many UNBEATABLE Values! Bring Your Room Measurements To SMULEKOFF'S Carpet Dept.. 2nd Floor   

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