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Cedar Rapids Gazette Newspaper Archive: May 15, 1974 - Page 7

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Publication: Cedar Rapids Gazette

Location: Cedar Rapids, Iowa

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   Cedar Rapids Gazette (Newspaper) - May 15, 1974, Cedar Rapids, Iowa                                Scarcely a racial ripple And now, blacks for Wallace The Cedar Rapids Gazette: Wed., May IS. W4 ;A By Tom Wicker in North Carolina and Alabama bnuwlil hod, I1CWS am, 1 la- Rw.d news was that era of ilimiyl K. the had news was that first "I Aliiliaiii.i. Two fads make the iwn points In Montgomery, Ala., voters from black district olecte Kufus wis. the black who organized the "f I95S. lo the slate legislature unop- iwsed. Hut the black sheriff of Uwndes county, John Hewlett, who was me black voter to be registered in lha, "mnty. announced during Hie campaign Hiat he would vote for Wallace. The bad news may not be quite as bad as it looks, but no one knows belter than (.eoree Wallace how to make the most of it- "C about 25 percent of the black vole m his re-election campaign, while running up a 64 percent majority over four hopeless opponents, and he carried! some predominantly black counties. Wallace also had some notable black supporters; in addition to Hewlett, Ihciv were, for example, Mayor John Ford .nf Tuskegee, Mayor Jay Cooper of Pritchnrd, and Probate Judge William McKinlcy Branch of Greene county. All these officials said they were supporting Wallace because they believed he hiad "changed." And indeed, the governor did aiot repeal his segregationist campaigns of the 1960s or his 1970 charges against the 'black bloc vole." Instead, he stressed programs that he said had benefited' all races free textbooks, for exampte _ and promised to be "governor of all the people." On the other hand, the Alabama turn- out was extremely low, to some eKtent because many black voters stayed home. Alabama political buffs attribute tbiis to "Wallace-hating blacks" who beilieve none of his opponents cou'ld win or were worth voting for. Other blacks are regis- tered in the National Democratic party of Alabama, largely a black organisation, and did not participate in the i-egular Democratic primary; they mighi run a black candidate against Wallace and the Republican nominee in November. Such quibbles will not deter George Wallace from contending now that he can't possibly be a racist, because he has ample black support in his home state! where the people know him best; and he High cost of not drafting GOVERNOR WALLACE will have the statistics to back thai claim. Together with Edward Kennedy's visit lo Alabama to honor him, his high standing in most Democratic polls, and public sympathy for his having been left an invalid some invalid! by a would-be assassin, the Alabama primary lias gone a long way to give Wallace the political "respectability" he never quite had before. That is a national political development of considerable importance, and one thai will make him an even more formidable Democratic or third-parly presidenlial contender in 197B. In the long run, however, it may be of even more importance that the once-. dominant "race issue" scarcely made its appearance in the Alabama campaign, or in a hard-fought North Carolina primary between three candidates to replace Sam J. Ervin, jr., in the United States senate. All three candidates repudiated busing to achieve racial balance in the schools, but otherwise stayed away from racial issues even though the victor, Attorney General Robert Morgan, had managed the 1960 campaign of segregationist I. Beverly Lake for governor, while one of the losers, Henry Hall Wilson, in that same 1960 race, had managed the vic- torious campaign of Terry Sanford, who was even then a moderate on race. John Lewis, the black director of the Voter Education Project, which has registered thousands of southern blacks in the last decade, believes that "the clement of race is losing its appeal" 'ii southern politics In fact, that In most southern states nowadays "no politician in his right mind would try to run a campaign and use race." If he did, in Lewis' view, he would lose white as well as black support. He pointed to the election of 13 blacks six more are in runoffs to the dramatically reapportioned Alabama legislature; and to a VEP fund-raising dinner recently held In Atlanta, attended by Georgia Gov. .llmmy Carter and most of the city's leading while business men, at which was raised to finance the registration of black voters in the South. Previously, the voter education project had raised its money mostly in the North, by mail solicitation and from founda- tions. Wallace could not have been unaware, for example, that of Alabama's 1.4 million registered voters, now are black about 20 percent. In 1960, Ihere were only black voters in the state. And John Lewis, by no means a Wallace man himself, even sees something lo be said for (hose black politicians who backed the governor last week. Men like Sheriff Hewlett and Judge Branch have become "practical poli- Lewis said, who saw little reason lo work against George Wallace when they knew ho could not be beaten, and when their communities were lo a large exlent dependent on the governor's goodwill. But that "bandwagon" factor, he pointed out, will not always be present in other southern primaries; in Alabama last week, it only meant that blacks are learning how to look after their own interests in the give-and-take of politics "just like the white folks." New York Times Service Head-on All things come to him going the wrong way on a one-way street. Son Francisco Chronicle Views Ideas Insights Judgments Comments Opinion Page 2 By Don Oakley JUST on the face of it, thsere would seem to be all kinds oif room for economizing in the defense department's record request far the com- ing fiscal year. This is a monstrous sum of money, even though it represents a; small frac- tion of America's total economic output: Americans, harried by inflation, per- ceiving no immediate threat to the na- tion's security and still looking for the Vietnam peace "dividerad" that has never materialized, inevitably question whether such an outlay is necessary. This kind of grass-roclls thinking is perhaps exemplified by one Florida newspaper editor, who poiteits out that our only two possible are Russia and China. "The idea th.it one or both of these powers would launch an unprovoked war on America is com- pletely says Rotoert K. Pepper. Why should the Soviet Union, which occupies a third of the land mass of the globe, seek lo seize the Dakota wheat fields when they can all the grain they want on credit, he asks? China does not have, and probabljT never will have, the long-range offensive capability to threaten us. The problem is not grave enough to warrant a large stamding army, he concludes. Yet one thing criliics tend lo slight when they question the defense budget is the fact that fully 55 lio 80 percent of this billion will go Inot fur missiles or ships or sophistic-ailed weaponry but simply lo meet the payrolls of the armed services which at "2.2 million men are already half a million below the level of lire-Vietnam 1964 ajiul 1.2 million less than that maintained by the Soviet Union. "Military critics scream about the high cost of says Rep. F. Ed- ward Hebert chairman of the house armed services committee. "But the cost of trying to do without the draft is high and will continue to increase." The army especially, which has discharged all but a tiny percentage of its draftees and has no prospects for any more, is discovering that it costs more and more to come up with less and less. Despite a quadrupling of military pay in the last 10 years, bonuses for four-year enlistments and a lowering of educational requirements, the army fell nearly 15 percent below its 1973 recruit- ment target and is currently 13 percent under authorized strength in its combat arms. It is becoming top-heavy with of- ficers. Heberl predicts thai in three years we will return to Hie draft because the effort lo establish an all-volunteer force will have failed and our defense structure will be weakened. Whether this will happen in Ihe absence of some new international crisis or a reversal of the trend toward, "detente" is something that only the next few years can tell. In the meantime, however, the time is rapidly approaching when the nation will have to make some realistic decisions about the kind of defense structure it wants or needs. If recruitment targets have fallen short, have the targets themselves been set too high? Should we be willing to spend even more for an even smaller force of better trained and better equipped professionals? Or is a highly paid, elite military force itself "undemocratic" and a potential danger? Should a period of some kind of public service be required of all young people, with military duty considered as one way of several of discharging that obligation? The answers are not easy, nor will any of them come cheaply. Newspaper enterprise Association Way with words Winning adjective Insights You con take my ifoel milk, my bankt, my inomay, but have ma my mon and I will build il all again. Andrew Carnagio By Theodore M. Bernstein LOAN word Hull's not alone. From the Italian, the English language has taken over simpatico, and a versalile term it is. Rom rte Luca of Pcnn Valley, I'a., sends in a list of some 51) meanings that have attached themselves In simpo- lico. Space does not permit listing them all, hut they range from amiable and amica- ble through benignant and brotherly, compotible and companionable, delightful and devoted, enchanting and engaging and lots more, to understanding, winning and winsome. Of course, not all of them are precise definitions of Ihe word, hut I hey do con- vey its flavor Wilh a complemenl like Ilial, no wonder Ihe word is complimen- lary. e Prefer. A lei lor In Iho editor ill New York paper contained a sentence Ihal said, "II is for these reasons Ihal we prefer Klfclliird II. Knh rofhor (lion Robert M. Morneiilhan." There are elraimsliinces in which profor tuny he followed hy rallioi Ilian, iml that is not one of them. Normally il is followed hy to: "We prefer Knll to Mor- genthau." However, a difficulty arises when an infinitive follows prefer. You cannot say, "I prefer to watch baseball to lo watch movies." Mere is an occasion on which rattier than may he used despite the fact il makes for redundancy since rather conveys Ihe sense of preference. 11 is idiomalic to say, "1 prefer to watch baseball rather than to watch movies." If yon don't like the redun- dancy, you can say, "1 prefer watching baseball to watching and all will he well. Word oddities. In Ihese days of streaking one occasionally reads that kids ran around in tlio buff. Naturally, il means nil Hul whence comes the word buff? One reference work relates it lo the color buff. A heller guess would he Ihal it is related to buff leather, which originally was made (rum the lildu of the buffalo and was smooth and velvety, somewhat like human skin. II may he added irrelevantly that slreakers don'l hide Hie hide. New Yolk I Illicit SvillHcnlo Sure we have only on the editorial page! MORE of Interest to Eastern lowans Summer vacation or just weekends away from home? Make your trips safe, carefree and smooth with this 'bonus" bargain on a new set of S.P.D. tires for your car. PRICE T S.P.D. POLY TIRE The long mileage tire S.P.D. means Specified Performance Design with smooth riding Polyester Cord Lateral gripping power on tread opens up to grip and hold the road for sure in-line stopping power. PRICE ROLL BACK! 4-for-one Price F78 x G78 x H78 x J78 x G78 x H78 X ONLY i and your old battery. Get a power-packed 36 month PM Battery at yes- terday's prices. Model 36-1 ONLY and your old battery. Stay mobile this Summer with this- Super-Power PM Battery. Model 36-24 Any purchase during sale qualifies you for this Jet-X multi-purpose pressure washer and sprayer With purchase only cleans all in trucks, tractors, homes, barns. Regular price BEST DEAL IN THE COUNTRY with the tires off your car SMOKEY THE BEAR LITTER BAG WITH ANY PURCHASE BARGAIN BASEMENT SPECIALS SEAL BEAMS all sizes..........Only SPARK PLUG for small engines C-47N...........................Only 85c H. D. BRAKE FLUID 12 oz. can ...Only 75c BRAKE FLUID for disc brakes 12 oz. can ....................Only FAN BELTS W119 ..............Only FILTERS PL-1-70 fits most Fords. .Only FILTER PE-PF-12 fits most Chevrolets ..............Only CHAMOIS SKIN FG-23 ..........Only All prices listed arc suggested retail at your participating Co-op COOP BELLE PLAINE-Farmers Co-Op IOWA CITY-Consumers Co-Op CALAMUS-Farmers Co-Op LOST NATSON-Lost Nation Consumers! 1 CLARENCE- Clarence Co-Op MARION- Linn Co-Op Oil Co. DEWITT-Clinion Co. Consumers TIPTON-Cedar County Co-Op   

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