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Cedar Rapids Gazette: Wednesday, May 15, 1974 - Page 5

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   Cedar Rapids Gazette (Newspaper) - May 15, 1974, Cedar Rapids, Iowa                                Rain will fall Wednesday night in the Pacific Northwest, and upper and mid-Missis- sippi valley and parts of the Northeast. Clear to partly cloudy elsewhere. Letters, Petitions on Shop Center Petitions and letters continued to pour into city hall Wcdnesdaj concerning a proposed shopping center at the intersection o highway 149 and Edgewooc! roat SW. The council will probably de cide next week whether to re zone 22 acres at the site, adjacent to 66 acres previously rezoned to permit construction of the facility. About 25 letters from individu als have been received this week on the matter, divided al most equally- between those who support the rezoning and those who oppose it. In addition, a petition bearing 218 signatures, op posing the rezoning, was submitted Wednesday by Libby Cox, 2801 Wilson avenue SW. Since the controversy began individual comments have been evenly split, while petitions favoring the proposal have heavily outweighed those opposing in ISMS, and ins master degree from the University Iowa in 1956. He was teacher and coach New Hartford high school 1939-40, and at Elgin high scho from 1940-43. After serving as naval officer during World w iday and Saturday ending u n d a y. Warming Saturday, urning cooler Sunday. Highs pper 60s to 70s. Lows upper 40s o 50s. C. R. Weather ligh Tuesday Fourth street in the 1500 to 1800 block SW. p.m. Tuesday. Two alarm fire under investigatioi at 860 Filth avenue SE. p.m. Tuesday. Needless call at 5511 Sixth- street SW. p.m. Tuesday. Candle on stove at 117 First avenue SW. a.m. Wednesday. Malfunction of alarm at 950 Shavei road NE. Magistrate's Court 1 Speeding- Bernard Kofron 2326 Teresa drive SW; fined and costs. Danny Himes Ely; fined. and costs. Doris Flanigan, Hiawatha; Rita Eg-gert, Coe college; Michae Fuchs, 624 Twenty-sixth street SE; Joseph Peterson, 715 Thirty-first street SE; Scot Andrea, 1538Vi First avenue NE; George Willits, 440 Nineteenth street NW; Steven Mon-eypenny, 5115 Kcsler road NE Susan Shaffer, Monticello David Fiala, 1327 Nineteenth avenue SW; Roger Tcchau, 70( Thirty-fifth street, Marion Ethan Akin, 1219 Twentieth avenue SW; Judith Wright 1208 Crestview drive SE; James Starkweather, Mt. V e r n o n Elwin Clary, Central City Larry Zeman, route three Cedar Rapids; each 'fined and costs. Mary Zahrt. route two, Marion; Ivor Stanley 3110 Terry drive SE; each 'fined S25 and costs. Waltei Swain, 258 Highland drive NW Karen Johnson, Independence Teresa Malloy, 816 C avneue NW; Janice May, 1948 B avenue NE; Janet Miller, 3000 J street SW; John Thomas, 183 Fourteenth avenue Karen Langenfeld, 151 Sussex drive NE; Carolyn Leidigh, 1614 Park Towne court NE; Kathryh Worley, Ely; Steve Jeffords, 330 South Eleventh street, Marion; each fined and costs. Driving: left of center line Steve Jeffords, 330 South Eleventh street, Marion; fined 520 and costs. Faulty equipment Steve Jeffords, 330 South Eleventh street, Marion; fined 315 and costs. Failure to stop Joseph Weber, 502 Second street SW; fined and costs. Traffic signal violation Ronald Meyers, 283 Lewellen drive NW; John Casali, 1611 rjollywoocl boulevard NE; Vail Janusa, Palo; Terry Hay, Des Moines; each fined and costs. Striking unattended vehicle Kent Scranton, 271 Boice NE; fined and costs. Donald Ratliff, 616 Fourth avenue SE; fined and costs. Driver's license violation Paul Chcsmore, 1037 Center Point road NE; fined and costs., Antonio Alfaro, 114 Fifth street SW; fined and costs. One-way street violation Wilma Russell, 2080 Eastern boulevard SE; fined and costs. Disturbing the peace LcRoy Webster, 814 Wilson avenue SW; fined and costs. Accidents, information and aid Cantomine, 1105 Eighth street SE; fined and costs. Iowa Deaths Manchester Letts, 54. Friday at at Shclly's, where friends may call after 11 a.m. Friday. Dysart Walter A. Kamlh-un, 70. Thursday at at Zion Lutheran church. Over-ton's. Vlnton Cecil F. Flickingcr, 67. Friday at 2 at Trinity Lutheran church. Campbell's. Iowa City Curtis Eyman, 78. Friday at 2 at Ripperclan funeral home. Mulberry Grove, 111. Friends may call at George L. Gay's from 4 p.m. to 9 p.m. Wednesday. I n d c ii c n d c n cc Malic Dawcs, 85. While's. Siffoiirncy Anna Bcbcv, 80. Friday at 10 at Lower Deer -reek Mcnnonilc church near Wcllman. Friends may call al Powell's, Kcoln, 'after 7 Wednesday. Kcola Chester Ogdcn Green, 57. Friday at at Powell's, where friends may call Thursday ow overnight Joon Wednesday p.m. Wednesday 55 recipitation None otal for May 3 'ormal for May 3.59 formal through May otal for 1974 14 arometer, rising tumidity at noon Wind direction and velocity al iazette weather station at 2 .m., WNW at 7 mph. Sun rises Thursday, sun els, Year' Ago Today High, 70; 51; rainfall, none. Traveler's Forecast Thursday Weather, Hi-Lo ismarck Cloudy Trail Martin: Experience With Labor Helpful Bill Martin, a candidate for ;he Democratic nomination for Linn county attorney, said Monday his experience in labor rela-ions would prove helpful in dealing with county employes. "The day to day orderly operation of county affairs will depend on a knowledgeable and experienced attorney in the idministration of the collective bargaining agreement with county employes." Martin said his experience as a labor relations counselor and lis master's degree in industrial would aid smooth abor relations with, unionized county employes. The remarks were made at a coffee given by Julie Stewart, 1816 Central drive NW. Martin is a former assistant county attorney and presently is T county hicago Shwrs incinnati Fair levelancl Fair es Moines Cloudy 67-48 etroit PtCldy iclianapolis Shwrs 72-56 ansas City PtCldy George Meyer Margretta Meyer, 71, wife c George Meyer, died Monday i Cedar Rapids after a Ion illness. She had resided in Mian: since 1960 when she and he rnsband moved from Ceda lapids. They returned to Ceda Rapids each summer, durin which time she was employed a Armstrong's. Surviving in addition to he msband are three daughters Marian Peters, Coral Gables Lois Newcomb, Ft. Lau derdale, Fla., and Beverly Sla man, Cedar Rapids; and a son fohn, Miami; seven gram children; five grea jrandchildrcn; and a sistei Vlary Burke, Burbank, Cali She was active in the Easter Star and American Legion iliary. Services: Thursday at p.m. at United Presbyteria church in Williamsburg. Friend may call 'at the Jones funera home and, if they wish, contrib ute to the cancer fund. Qlwaukee PtCldy 55-40 Ipls.-St. Paul ..Cloudy 57-36 maha PtCldy t. Louis PtCldy ioux Falls PtCldy Degree Days uesday otal to date 6 hrough May 14, 1973 crcent of normal year .102.26 otal normal year Mississippi Stages (Flood stages In brackets) LaCrosse (12) 7.1, tail .1 Lansing (18) 9.0, fall. 1 Dam 9 17.6, rise .1 McGregor (18) 9.8, rise .1 Guttenberg (15) 8.6, fall .1 Dubuquc (17) 11.4, rise .5 Davenport (15) 9.5, no lange Kcokuk (16) Cedar at C.R. (13) C.SO, rise 5 Coralvilie Lake ool level Wednesday 679.22 Births St. Luke's May 14 To the families of on Fcder, 4617 Bcver avenue E, a daughter; Robert Shi-anek, Monticello, a daughter; 'illis AVescman, 116 Twelfth reel SE, a daughter; Bert nlcman, 1525 Fourth avenue E, a son; Walter Murray, 1003 inlh avenue SE, a daughter. Births Mercy May 14 To the families of limy Zeman, 6C55 Mt. Vcrnon ad SE, a son; Richard Sclken, eystone, a son; Thomas Van ten, 3216 Bowling street SW, daughter. May 15 Mr. and Mrs. AI-rt Barnes, jr., 180 Twenty's! street, Marion, a daughter. Marriage Licenses Linda Wasingcr and James oincwood, Louise Kelley and cnnis natzlaff, all of Cedar a p i d s Deborah Kelley, arion, and Mike Whitson, liana. Marriages Dissolved Janet Elaine and Frank John ichacl. Cynthia A. and Paul Linda L. and ivid J. Bosier. Ellen Joyce d Hollcn Edward Martin, icila and Gilbert Drahos. Fires p.m. Tuesday. Assls-nco call at 4317 Sherman NE. p.m. Tuesday. DefiT.llvc >vc at 1117 Third avenue SW. p.m. Tuesday. Miilfiinc-m of clevntnr nt First street d Second avenue SE. p.m. Tuesday. 1'nlsc inn at '100 K avenue NIC. p.m. Tuesday. Needless II in alloy behind N Center Hike Scheduled A spring wildflower walk .will ie presented by the Indian >eek Nature center Sunday rom 2 to 4 p.m. Shapes, forms, colors, and life listorics of the various wild-lowers and trees in bloom will >e pointed out. Wildflowcrs likc-y lo be in bloom are purple rillium, Mayappie, strawberry, ihlox and violets. Picking wildflowers or other 'egelation is prohibited, but pic-urc-taking is welcome. Hikers lioultl wear comfortable walk-ng shoes. Children under 12 hould be accompanied by an idult. The hike is open to the public. A fee of 25 cents per person will be collected from non-members. Hikers should meet at the Trail on Bertram road South of parking lot of the Sac and Fox Ml'. Vernon road Services Morris, Mary K. a.m. Thursday at Immaculat Conception church. Rosary wil be recited at 7 p.m. Wedncsda ar Memorial funeral home. En tombmenl will be in Ihe Chape of Memories mausoleum. While, John C. Mass of th Resurrection Thursday at 1 a.m. in St. Judc's church by th Rev. Richard Amcnt. Burial Mt. Calvary cemetery. Friend may call at the Stewart funera home Wednesday until 9 p.m. F a r n s w o r t h, Clement Turner chapel west Thursdaj noon by the Rev. Carrie Deacon. Burial: Esgate ccmclery a VTaquokela. Friends may call a Turner wcsl, Touscy, Vircinia Klanp Turner chapel east at a.m. Thursday by Dr. John P Woods. There will be a cremn-ion committal. Friends may register at Turner easl. The casket will not be opened a my lime. Fire SINGAPOKE (AP) A fillip thnt ferries pilgrims lo Mecca caught fire off Singapore early Sunday, but all 5li crew nembcrs were rescued. One nan was hospitalized with ads perform an impor nnl community service, rea( hem daily! Light Up Someone's aJW. "ay with Flowers I ILHOUIl 0 tunt 1 800 Ellli Blvd. NW FLOWERPHONE 366- CHAPEL 1" I'lil'lif .SVrrirc Inquire About Our I're-nrranRWl Services Cedar Knplds DEATHS Prairie School Official Dies Howard Cecil Strong, 58, of 1424 Harold drive SE, assistant superintendent of College Com- munity schools since 1969, died Tuesday following a lingering illness. Mr. Strong was born May 11, 191G, at Oeitvcin, and was mar- ried to Bonnie Curry, Aug. 2, 1942, in Cedar Rapids. Howard C. Strong He received his bachelor of arts degree from Upper Iowa Double Trouble TrocA Torpedoes, Flares Stolen Kailroad police believe chil- The (rack torpedo is power- (ircn arc responsible for the (ul enough to blow off a pcr- thcft Monday of explosives son's hand, Christenscn said. and a, special radio from a The fusees arc used for sig- Milwaukee Koad caboose. naling at night. Many times The caboose was parked on experienced persons suffer in- the tracks near Franklin park juries caused by particles of the fusees which break loose and lodge on the person's clothing, he said. Christcnsen said (he tor- schools and children are frc- pedoes arc a half inch thick Quick Arrest Made in Rural C. R. Brealdn Linn deputies made a quick arrest Tuesday night in connec- iun with a breakin at a rural >dar Rapids residence in which more than worth and Twentieth street NE, when several fusees and track torpedoes were taken. The area is near several In custody Wednesday in IJnnj county jail pending arraignment I Regent street NE. quently seen playing in the area. U. James Christcnsen, of the Milwaukee Road police department, said the fusees and torpedoes could bo dan- gerous if used by inexperi- enced persons. A track torpedo, he said, is an explosive charge laid on a (rack and Used as a warning signal for oncoming trains. When exploded it makes a and about one and one-half inches square. fusees are about a half inch in diameter and about ten inches long. Both explosives are wrapped in red paper with a paraffin coating. The radio valued at is used solely for railroad com- munications and cannot be al- tered for other use, Chrisien- sen said. Deputies said Arnold It. Port reported the breakin about p.m. Tuesday and that McNabb According to several hours former Nixon sound similar to a gunshot The Cedar Rapids police de- that can be heard inside a partmenl is also investigating locomotive. the theft. (Continued from Page 1.) building and rigged clectii cables around the building presumably attached to cxplo sives as the Israelis brough two Arab prisoners by heli copter to the village to bargai with the guerillas. Normally the school would have been empty. But officials said about 110 schoolchildren and several teachers on a bus tour of biblical sites in north- ern Galilee were billeted there About 20 of the children, a teacher and their bus driver es caped by leaping from second story windows. Several were re ported injured. All were asleep when the Arabs burst in. They told them in Hebrew: "Nothing will hap pen to you if you will be quiet." Then they separated the chil dren, putting the girls on one floor and the boys on another. Take Cover Security forces sealed off thi area and surrounded the build ing, mounting machine guns on nearby rooftops. Local residents were ordered to take cover in bomb shelters as the guerilla., fired from the windows. The terrorists sent out one o the teachers with a list of the Arabs whose freedom they de manded. Defense Minister Moshe Dayan took a helicopter to Maa lot to take charge of the forces laying siege to the guerillas. "Where is our angry villagers screamed at im. The villagers said a detach- ment of troops had been guard- ,ng them against a terrorist at- ;ack but were moved out ol Maalot 24 hours before the guerillas struck. Aimed at Jerusalem The attack concided with the 26th anniversary of Israel's in- dependence which was cele- brated last month by the Jewish calendar and during the night a bomb exploded in Jerusalem and three Katyusha rockets were found aimed at the heart of the Israeli capital. The rockets were found on launchers near the hilltop head- quarters of the U.N. truce orga- lization and were primed with a iming device. Sappers dis- mantled them seconds before :hey were set to detonate. A neighbor of the family mur- dered by the guerillas before hey took over the school said ie heard shouts of "Open the are police looking for errorists." Then came a burst of gunfire, screams, and a wo- man's voice shouting, "Solo- mon, go back." A baby was found alive be- neath a bed in the blood-spat- ered house. Gazette Directors, Officers Re-elected Stockholders of The Gazette Co. held their annual meeting Vednesday and re-elected J. F. iladky, jr.; M. M. Thompson, r.; William C. Crawford, John Donnelly and J. F. Hladky III o the board of directors. The directors then met and e-elccted J. F. Hladky, jr., iresident and general manager 'f the company, J. F. Hladky 11 executive vice-president, Crawford vice-president, Thompson secretary and Don- icily treasurer. Arson Possible Cause of Fire At Laundromat A fire that began in the rear of a self service laundromal caused moderate damage Tues- day to the frame building at 860- 66 Fifth avenue SE, which also houses a tavern and a grocery store. Fire officals say the cause ol Ihe fire, reported at p.m., is still undetermined, but could possibly have been arson. Wash laundromat, Merlisa Tap and the Food Center. The fire was confined to the laundromat and the tavern, ac- cording to the fire department. The building suffered smoke damage throughout. The grocery store was open ror business Wednesday despite the fire. The Cedar Rapids Gazette: 15, 1974 items were stolen. (Continued from Page 1.) ferrcd to staff suggestions and recommendations made at a May 9 closed session. It was these references that caused Rodino to rule that the memo had violated rules of confiden- tiality and could not be dis- icussed at an open hearing. Tapes Sought .vas Danny McNabb, 25, of 1122 j p0ar noted that there were i two meetings April 4, at which vas arrested later. They attributed the quick ar- rest to good, routine police work jy another deputy, who earlier Tuesday night had checked out a car parked near the Port resi- d e n c e northwest of Cedar Rapids. After the breakin was report- ed the car was traced to Mc- Nabb, who was then found and arrrested. Reported stolen in the breakin were 11 firearms valued at a coin collection valued at and several other items. Most of the loot was recovered, authorities said. the subject of the so-called Uddy plan may have come up. testimony by campaign aide Job Stuart Magruder before the Watergate committee, former Attorney General Mitchell ap- proved Ihe political intelligence plan March 30, 1972, at a meet- ing in Key Biscaync, Fla. Doar also asked for tapes of six meetings and telephone con- versations June 30, 1972, in- volving the President, former White House aide H. R. Halde- man and former special counsel Colson. the requested conversa- C. R. Man Faces Federal Charge Ervin Douglas Terry, 1120 Second avenue SE, was charged with forgery and uttering and publishing of a federal treasury check in an appearance before federal Magistrate James Hodges, jr., Tuesday. The charge originated in De- The building houses the Easy- troit, and a removal hearing is scheduled for May 28. Secret service agents were to have served the warrant, but Terry turned himself in to Cedar Rapids police Tuesday. Hodges released Terry on his own re- cognizance on the conditions that he not leave the state anc appear before the court regular- Witness Places Hall in Dorm on Night of Murder By Ford Clark IOWA CITY The prosecu- tion has produced a witness in the James Hall, murder case who testified he saw Hall in the dormitory about an hour before the body of Sarah Ann Ottens ;vas discovered. Hall is charged with the March 13, 1973, murder of Miss Ottens, a U. of Iowa coed. Earnest Roberson, a universi- :y student, testified Tuesday that ie received two telephone calls rom Hall between 10 and he night Miss Ottens was slain. Roberson lived on the seventh loor of Rienow hall and Miss Ottens occupied a room on the ourth floor of the coeducational dormitory. Telephone Calls Roberson said he received a call on two occasions in which Hall asked him to let him (Hall) n the building. Entry to the building was sup- rased to be by key only. Rober- son said he encountered Hall in stairway between the fourth and fifth floors of the building. Roberson, who described him- self as a friend of Hall's, said he 'just figured Jim had met .omebody who opened the door or him." "2 or 3 Minutes" Roberson further said it didn't eem possible Hall could have o 11 c n from his dormitory icross the street to where Ro- icrson saw him in the "two or liree minutes between the call ind when I saw him." Under questioning by the de- ense, Roberson admitted it light have been more than two r three minutes between the all and seeing Hall. Roberson aid Hal] did not appear upset r excited "in any way. He was i a good humor and kidded me bout having a girl in my room. Ie just laughed and said he'd Roberson testified a friend as helping him type a school apcr he was writing. Defense Counters Wednesday morning, the dc- cnse countered with testimony rom Terry Abernathy. Ironically, the spring break tiring which Miss Ottens was lain was Ihe first time the uni- ersily had made a conccntrat- d effort to secure all university ormilories from non-residents. Since 1909 flowers for all occasions JOHN E. LAPES Convcnienl downlown location :W8.1nlAvo.SK Abernathy, head resident ol Rienow hall, testified to these security arrangements. Defense attorneys for Hall so licited testimony from Aber nathy to the effect he had dis covered the gate to a tunne leading into the building had nol been locked. Unlocked Gate Abernathy said the gate should have been closed and locked at 5 p.m. He said he discovered the un- ocked gale much later in the evening. "I may or may not lave called campus security about this." The defense attempted to get Abernathy to admit the possibil- ty that he may have admitted Hall to the building. Abernathy said ne could not recall whether he did. He did admit knowing Hall by sight Didn't Suspect Abernathy, who was sum- moned to the room after Brenda Simpson discovered the body, said, "It never occurred to me that ,it was murder. I :hought it was either suicide or a drug overdose." Miss Ottens' body was discov- ered covered by a blanket in the middle of the room. Under questioning, Abernathy said the drapes were open, ights were on in the room and activities in the room possibly could have been viewed from Slater hall, another nearby dor- mitory. Late Wednesday morning, the state introduced Duane L. Bar- on, a laboratory specialist and special agent for the bureau of criminal investigation. Barton described the body of Miss Ottens. He also described ;he finding of a fingerprint on :he cold faucet of the sink in the room. There was bloody water which filled the sink halfway, he said, ind Miss Ottens' hair was wet. Barton also testified to the han- of evidence in the case. Drunk Driving Charge Filed Against Man Marvin Raymond Little, C9, of 221 Twenty-third street NE, was charged Tuesday 'with drunk driving. Police arrested Little after his car hit two parked cars in the block of First avenue NE. All tions on that day took place after the President had talked )y telephone with Mitchell, the "irst conversation between the .wo since the Watergate break- n. The While House has said the Nixon -Mitchell talk never was recorded because it was on telephone not tied into the .aping system. The last three conversations were between the President and -taldeman June 23, 1972, at a ime the White House was con- cerned that the FBI investiga- ion of the Watergate breakin might expose a secret CIA op- eration. One of the items presented in closed session Tuesday was the )laying of a Dictabelt of the President's recollections of the June 20 .telephone conversation with Mitchell. It lasted less :han one minute and was the iirst recording played for the full 38-member committee.. Senators Won't Unite Against Resignation WASHINGTON (AP) Key senate Republicans have side- tracked a White House sugges- tion they take united action op- posing President Nixon's resig- nation even though most say they feel that way as individu- als. The brief effort, which includ- ed an on-again, off-again senate G 0. P. leadership meeting, came Tuesday as key Republi- cans. made clear they agree vith the Democrats that Nixon's ate should be settled by the im- leachment process rather than iy resignation. G.O.P. Leader Scott of Penn- ylvania, Sen. Tower (R-Texas) ind Sen. Cotton all aid they agree with the position hat resignation would be- la mistake. The suggestion for a joint i.O.P. effort, to counter the res- gnation calls that were made ast week by several Republican senators and a number .of con- s e r v a t i v e newspapers, was ipread outside the weekly Re- publican policy luncheon by Tom Korologos, the chief White House liaison man at the senate. However, Cotton, the head of the Republican conference and one of those contacted by Koro- ogos, said he personally would not sign an anti-resignation statemenl, .though he strongly opposes the move for Nixon to "Most of (hose people ask- ing him to resign are people up for re-election who don't want lo vote on impeach- said Cotton, who is re- tiring from the senate rather than run for re-election this year. Cotton said that during the lolicy luncheon, a piece of japer was passed lo him saying he G.O.P. leadership would meet the next morning. Laler, ie received a second one saying he meeting was off. Study Ordered on Water Dept. Bids Bids from five suppliers on ire hydrants, valves, valve loxcs and sleeves were referred o the water department Vednesday morning. Not all the bidders submitted mis on all the 42 types of cquip- nent needed, and delivery dales aried greatly, so it was not im- mediately apparent Wednesday vhich firm was the low bidder. Let our Flowers express your respect and love FLORIST and GIFT SHOP 364-8139 phono answered hours evory day.   

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