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Cedar Rapids Gazette Newspaper Archive: May 13, 1974 - Page 6

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Publication: Cedar Rapids Gazette

Location: Cedar Rapids, Iowa

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   Cedar Rapids Gazette (Newspaper) - May 13, 1974, Cedar Rapids, Iowa                                1th? (titbit Editorial Page Fulbright slips, bumped by rising star Monday, May 13. W74 Legislative session, 1974: Difficult but rewarding T ABORING under difficulties lj that divided its leadership on many occasions, Iowa's 1974 legislature productively repeated its 1973 patterns in adopting legislation other than its tax-cut masterpiece. It raised salaries of state employes an average of 7.5 per- cent. It put up several million dollars to meet cost-of-living increases. It pumped several million into the school aid foun- dation program to further relieve property taxes. It voted million for a capital improvement program in parks and recreation areas. It passed a public employes' collective bargaining bill. It appropriated several million for new buildings on the statehouse grounds and at regents' institu- tions. It allocated million to expand the Iowa Educational Broadcasting System statewide. It channeled million to a coal research project that may result in long-range energy-saving recommendations. Second of two editorials That barelv touches what the legislature did this year. On the darker side, there were some deepenings of dangerous precedent too: A million appropriation to initiate busing service for nonpublic school students. Another to fund a hot lunch program for nonpublic students. A appropriation to a private osteopathic college in Des Moines to help finance its family-physician program. Still another faulty precedent developed in both houses through the circumventing of presiding offfcers' decisions by suspension of the rules, rather than by challenges directly to the chair, to gain dubious ends. It was by this means that the house added long-truck amend- ments to the bill creating a new state department of transporta- tion. The upshot was a measure dealing with two different sub- jects, in direct defiance of the state constitution's mandate that each bill shall deal with one sub- ject only. After 1973's legislative session the headline over our evaluation editorial read: Frustrating but productive. This time it reads: Difficult but rewarding. Over-all, that well befits the 65th general assembly, which set a record not only for length of a two-session legislature but also for tackling more complex problems than any of its predecessors. The legislature, to be sure, could not agree on other complex problems criminal code revision, no-fault insurance and a land-use policy, to mention only three. But it handled more than its share and rates a high mark for the service it performed. High camp, vintage '64 NOSTALGIA collectors who think the 1940s and '50s yield the choicest artifacts should examine the James Bond trend inspired by President Kennedy in the early '60s. As most adults will recall, JFK allowed that no leisure reading pleased the presidential palate more than an Ian Fleming spy yarn. About as quick as you could say SMERSH, bookracks were filled with James Bond paper- backs and an out-at-the-elbows actor, Sean Connery, was enroute to riches playing Fleming's an- tihero in the movies. The gimmicks exploding briefcases, multi-weapon sports cars, et al still seem fairly up- to-date, but the sexism saturating those works makes them high camp indeed. Consider, for example, "Gold- recently reshown on TV: For betraying her boss, the malign Mr. Goldfinger, and People's forum Integrated learning To the Editor: Recent news reiwrts about negotiations with Maharishi International university for purchase of Parsons college in Fair- field, Iowa, have failed to convey to the public the nature of MIU. This gross misrepresentation of MIU needs to be corrected. Maharishi International university, or- ganized in 1971, a new approach to education. Subjects are taught in an integrated and holistic manner that relates all fields of study into one. This approach is so successful that it prompted the Western Accrediting Board lo claim it as "the most integrated approach to education since Aristotle." The concept has resulted in a superior form of teaching that may have a profound effect on improving the quality nf our educational institutions. As to the moral code of MIU students and faculty, Fairfield area residents will be pleased to find Ihat they arc polite, well groomed and responsible The reason MIU is considering the Parsons college parcel is not tin.' result of any ill will against the school. The lasl three years classes have been held in a leased apartment complex in Santa Bar- surrendering to Bond's charms, the shapely Jill Mastersqn suffers death by suffocation (sym- bolically painted One is given to believe that the liaison with Bond made the fate nearly bearable. Later, following his near emas- culation by a laser (the most harrowing episode, Agent 007 conquers erstwhile les- bian Pussy Galore. Her defection from Goldfinger's camp straight- away foils the plot to knock over Ft. Knox. The amour sizzling at fadeout will be short-lived, however, because in the next adventure Bond's sundry conquests involve 'no mention of Miss Galore. The late Mr. Fleming's works and the sexist films they inspired are fertile grounds indeed for nostalgia nuts. If "Goldfinger" is ever refilmed, though, the lib movement may dictate that the laser finds its mark. bara, Calif. The university has been seeking a site for permanent facilities since its organization. Parsons is cen- trally located in the United States and could serve the needs of the unjversity. I urge that the media investigate the school further to inform the public of the tremendous benefit to lowans by locating MIU at Fairfield. Personally, I would overwhelmingly welcome the move. Mark R. Rainbow Glen Elm drive NE Misinformed To the Editor: On May 1, the Gazette ran a small ar- ticle on page 2A purporting to be an ac- count of statements made by a Democratic candidate for congress at a candidate forum sponsored by the Hawkeye Labor Council. The story, un- fortunately, seriously misinformed readers since the candidate, Michael Blouin, did not even attend the meeting. I feel this is irresponsible journalism by The Gazette and shady politics on Mr. Blouin's part. I assume Mr. Blouin prepared a news release in advance and then went ahead and let it be printed knowing that it would be inaccurate. After doing some checking I discovered that his hometown news- paper. The Telegraph-Herald, was taken in by the same trick. I urge you to consider giving your readers more first-hand coverage of the many primary races, so that in the fu- ture, candidates for public office might By Rowland Evans and Robert Novak LITTI.K KOI'K, ABK. The reason tor the probable dt'feal of Sen. ,1. Fulbright by (iiiv. Dale Bumpers in the May 28 senate Democratic primary, an event that would propel an important new figure into national politics, can be partly explained by a whispered com- ment In Bumpers al a roadside res- taurant. A retired Methodist minister pledged Bumpers his vole, then confided: "But m tell tin' truth, Governor, I'd even vote for a colored man against Fnlbrigbt." Such incidents are commonplace, leading to this consensus: ANYBODY could heal Fulbright in Arkansas in W74. Tims, bis defeat would stem not from the Watergate syndrome polluting Washington politicians, nor even Bumpers' unquestioned popularity. Rather, after 311 anomalous years of represent ing Arkansas in the senate, the string lias finally run out on the aloof and aristocratic intellectual. By pure ac- cident, the man taking advantage of t'hat is not a provincial nobody but an impressive political newcomer of broad ambition and potential Although the courthouse cliques tradi- tionally in control of Arkansas politics are backing Fnlbrigbt, that is no longer adequate. Poll results are staggering: Bumpers' latest figures show him more than 2 to 1 over the senator. Anli- Knlbriglit sentimen1 has so hardened that only a miracle can save him. That steins, uartty front a feetiug liere that Kulbrighl. who maintains no residence in Arkansas, has become dis- tant and unapproachable as chairman of the foreign relations committee in Washington. "Bill's a lot smarter than the rest of us ni says a ruuiitry lawyer who formerly supported him but now backs Bumpers. "If you don't believe that, just ask him." Beyond personality considerations lies a murky ideological incompatibility between Fulbright and his native state. To bine-collar workers and farmers who carried Arkansas for George Wallace in 19B8. Fulbright's battle against the Viet- nam war confirms their instinctive iden- tification nf him' as a "liberal" and "egghead" (though, in fact, his voting record is not all that liberal on domestic Fulbright was ready for plucking in 1968 and managed only 53 percent against two lackluster primary op- ponents. Arkansas politicians viewed his defeat as inevitable this time, probably by former Gov. Sid McMath if Bumpers did not run. Bumpers' entry simply enhances the prospect. Emerging from the obscurity of a small-town lawyer four years ago to score a stunning upset for governor over Orval Faubus and Winthrop Rockefeller, NOVAK Bumpers at 48 is one of the most popular politicians in the state's history. The Bumpers national image is that of a new breed southern liberal, but he views himself more as a centrist and privately derides "limousine liberals." Most important, lower-income whites who backed Wallace can relate to Bumpers as they cannot to Fulbright. Although Prof. Arthur Schlesinger, jr., and the New Republic have commenced public mourning over the probable loss of Fulbright for the liberal cause in foreign policy, Fulbright knows his only chance to survive is on more mundane issues. "Seniority is an asset to a small he told uncomprehending students at Westark junior college in Fort Smith last week. Almost plaintively, he challenges Bumpers to say where he has failed. The strategy concocted for Fulbright by Washington campaign consultant Mark Shields is to portray Bumpers as just another pretty face. "We are not running for homecoming queen." says Fulbrighl. His theme for fullpage news- paper advertisements and television cummcrcials: "It's more than just a IHipuIarily contest. It's the most crucial election in America." The vigorously pro-Fulbright Arkansas Gazette refers lo the governor editorially as "Smiley" Bumpers. But stronger medicine is needed to boat Bumpers, a superb campaigner and stump speaker whose governorship has been widely acclaimed. There is con- sequently apprehension in the Bumpers camp that Fulhright's dignified and re- strained criticism will intensify into all- out assault as election day nears. That prospect terrifies Bumpers supporters, not because it may defeat him but because it may scar him for a future na- tional ride. When Bumpers was considering the race against Fulbright early this year, an aide asked an Arkansas labor leader his opinion. Bumpers would win, the union man said, but the battle would be so bit- ter that Bumpers' national amibitions would be prematurely crippled. To prevent that, Bumpers never mentions Fulbright's name and soft-pedals all cri- ticism on the theory that Fulbrighl's number is up anyway. The intent is obvious. If be can win without bloodshed. Bumpers could become the most available southern moderate for a Democratic national ticket if not in 1OT then in Ihc future. Publishnrs-Holl Syndicate Too much self-service sensed Political gamesmen turn the public sour By Louis Harris The Harris Survev government leadership to that prevailing ten years agn, BO percent of the American people feel that the state Of the nation has grown worse. Basically, the public agrees with the statements that too many leaders are "just out for their own personal and financial are too busy "playing smart and are afraid to trust the public as adults and tell them the hard truth about inflation, energy, and other, subjects." Taken together, there is a strong under- current in America today that political .leadership is sadly out of date, out of touch, and wedded to a politics of "promise more" rather than possessing the courage to ask the people to make sacrifices for the good of the country. There seems little doubt that the tradi- tional electioneering appeals to fear or self-interest may have become outmoded. Recently in mid-April, the Harris Sur- vey asked a cross-section of households nationwide this series of questions: "Let me read you some statements which have been made about political leadership in this country. For each, tell me if you tend to agree or disagree {read Government leaders should ask people not what their country can do for them, but what they can do for ttieir country......... 89 The trouble with most govern- ment leaders is that they think people will believe them when they make promises 73 Too many government leaders are just out for their own persona] and financial gain EXPLETIVE DELETED 'First and now Willy Brandt that's TWO world leaders who have gracefully resigned recently Dis- Nol ogree sure Most government leaders are more interested in playing smart politics rather than in sharing in the same genuine idealism the people hove......... 76 Most government leaders are afraid to treof the public as adults and tell them the hard truth about inflation, energy, and other subjects People who could make good government leaders don't want to run for office because they know government leaders receive no thanks for public service anymore The way the media treat government leaders, they have little chance of sue-' ceeding in the public's 55 34 44 45 72 18 TO Most people are too quick to condemn, most things government leaders do 60 35 find it more difficult to deceive voters in .such a manner. Carolyn Thys 1 mil Wiley boulevard NW (Editor's nofe: If is impossible to staff all candidates' political appearances, so the choice is either to ignore them or to print information based on their own releases. Blouin campaign spokesmen have promised not to let the same mistake occur again. 'When any candidate's releases are found to be consistently unreliable, their publication naturally is Misusing Books To Ihc Kditor: Dii yiitt enjoy and appreciate hunks from the Cedar Rapids public library? Sn tin I. Insights One of (he many things no- body ever fells you middle age is thai il't such a nice change from being young. Dorothy F'uhur But can one really say he enjoys a book Ihat a previous reader has underscored, bracketed, arrowed, or marginal-noted, tn such an extent Ihat your mind is turned away from the text-cited, rather than to it? Perhaps the previous reader's point (if emphasis does nut coincide with yours. Does the next reader want a book outlined for you by someone else? If the previous reader was smart enough to thus propound his viewpoint nn the subject matter, it is expected that he would be decent enough to take a piece of paper to note thereon the number nf the page that intrigues him, and jot down his remarks. Simple. When he returns a clean book to the library, he still has his meaningful notes. On the person who perpetrated this defacement in pencil (which took me of an hour lo it is my view that to also underscore in- numerable lines in red ink shows a lack of regard for his privilege of borrowing the book from the library, no charge. His lack of respect for the next presumably knowledgeable readers is iniforgivcable. The book I refer to is "Introduction lo Logic" by I'rof. Patrick Suppes, proixirly of the Kapids public library. It Is my hope that the person who was sn profligate with use of his red-ink pen on this book will read this letter, and be moved to send a check to the library tit compensale fffr his misuse of privilege. Hilda Wiillerlck Iffl Thirteenth street NW These results shed light on just how far the public feels the leadership nf the country has drifted apart from the people. Left too soon To the Editor: I would like In use this forum for the purpose nf telling those people who left before Monday night's (May fi) symphony concert was over, what a great piece of work they missed. Brahm's Fourth Symphony was superbly per- formed. Soloists come and go, but our symphony is the result of hours of prac- tice by our local people, who must per- form at least one great work per month, besides accompaniments for guest soloists. I feel it is a dishonor to our director and musicians when they play lo a lesser audience following intermission. Of course, it just happens I hut the piece de resistance for me was Hrahms. Belly .1. liemley Anamosa LETTERS Tho Gazette's ndilorinl page comos renders' opinions, lo Ihoso Innqlh limili Onn Ipttor put wrilrjr nvury 30 All may bu comloimjcl cine) oclildd wilhoul chanqinn moaning. Now DuhllilMcl (inonyinoiitly. Wfltflf'i toloplioni! numhor (not prmtrjdj follow nctino, nnd rondcihlc hnnclwriltnn ilrinolurrj to Imlp oiitltmilkalif ContiitiH rlfinl motfi witli nnd (wwil-, tlinn pmsonfjlilini. No pnimy 1. The public has obviously grown weary of hearing politicians promise quick and easy solutions to complex problems, and that self-interest of the electorate will automatically be served by returning a particular party or can- didale to office. 2. The public is convinced that the practice of politics is ton often an exer- cise in self-aggrandizement and a quest for personal gain by the officeholder. 3. The notion popular among some politicians that the average voter has "a 12-year-old mentality" is belied by the voter's own testimony. Nearly three in every four say they arc tired nf being treated as children and would prefer to hear the hard realities about this country's problems. Nearly nine in every ten go along with the urging of the late President Kennedy that "government leaders should ask people not what their country can do for them but what they can do for their country." 4. At the same time, people seem tn be asking better types of candidates to present themselves, expressing regret Ihat "people who could make good government leaders don't run for office because they know government leaders receive no thanks for public service anymore." By a narrow 47-44 percent, the public rejects the idea that the mass media don't give our leaders a chance to suc- ceed, although a percent say (hat citizens themselves are too quick lo condemn most things government leaders do. Fundamentally, the people appear to be in a mood lo welcome new types of political leaders, and are ready lo give such leaders tint benefit nf the doubt. They are weary of the Ilimt-hnnnml approach of assuming that the people dn not want to hear about troubles, cannot face the hard realities needed to over- come serious problems, and are assumed to be neither mat lire enough nor courageous enough to put their own parochial intori'sts nliowi Iliose of the country and Ihc common good. CtllrriQii tribune Vnrk Svmllrnle   

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