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Cedar Rapids Gazette: Tuesday, May 7, 1974 - Page 8

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   Cedar Rapids Gazette (Newspaper) - May 7, 1974, Cedar Rapids, Iowa                                8 The Cedar Kspids Gazelle; Tues., May 7. 1974 Busing May Benefit 30, DBS MOINES (AP) A mea- sure requiring local public school districts to transport pri- vate school students to their schools may benefit some Iowa school children. "The legislature estimated this legislation might cover about students', but think that is a little said Sam Wiley, a consultant to the school budget review committee of the state department of pub- lic instruction The bill signed Monday by Gov. Robert Ray appropriates million to the DPI. Half of the funds will be used to trans- port private school students, the remaining half go to the school budget review committee to pay for extra buses and other neces- sary equipment. .No Idea Wiley said he has "no idea" how many new buses will be required by local districts. Hej said it usually takes eight months for delivery of a bus after it is ordered. The busing measure replaces a bill passed a year ago requir- ing public school districts to pro- vide auxiliary services, such as special education and remedial education classes, to private schools. None of (he 54.4 million ap- proved last year for auxiliary services has been spent because that act has been tied up in a federal court suit. Supporters of the auxiliary bill believe the three-judge fed- eral court will rule the measure unconstitutional, thus freeing that money for the busing mea- sure. Revokes Bill To make sure, the busing bill also revokes the auxiliary ser- vices bill. Supporters of (lie bill think the measure could pass a court test, citing a U. S. supreme court decision in the 1940s that ruled a similar measure in New Jersey constitutional. They said the money appro- priated would not go to the private schools, but would go to the public schools only to assure that private school students re- ceived transportation to school. However, the new law which becomes effective July 1 also appears headed for a court tes by a group that says the bit represents an illegal mingling o the affairs of church and state. Anticipates Challenge Arlene Jens of Davenport president of (he federation ol church and state separationists said the group anticipate! challenging the constilutionalitj of the bus bill within two months. She said the measure violates [he U. S. Constitution because there is no way to separate the iransportation of students from other functions of education. Public school officials will be breed to consider the needs ol non-public school students in de- iermining bus routes, she said, Property Value Adjustments Are Ordered in 12 Counties By Harrison Weber DBS MOINES (IDPA) State Revenue Director Don- ald Briggs baa instructed boards of review in a dozen counties to make certain per- centage adjustments in the valuation of property. Last fall, a number of asses- sors were informed by the state that they needed to make adjustments in certain types of property in order to equalize property between various assessing jurisdic- tions. Most of the Assessors com- plied, but several did not. This latest action is a result of a review of the records by the State Revenue Director and the State Property Tax Divi- sion. Under ihe new fiscal year law, the equalization order will apply to taxes payable in 1975 and 1976. The first pay- ment will be due by Oct. 1, 1975, the second by April 1, 1976. The 12 counties are: Dal- las, Wayne, Warren, Fayette, Buchanan, Dickinson, Kossuth, Decatur, Polk, Mahaska, Wright and Clayton. In only two instances are Clark: Reform Needed in Commodify Fufures Control WASHINGTON (UPI) Sen. Dick Clark said Mon- day the general accounting of- fice (GAO) report on the com- modity futures trade indicates the need for "total reform of government regulation in' this area." dark said he hopes the re- port will have a "significant im- pact on congress' legislation on the and added that he or that this body be granted mendations when the senate ag- r i c u 11 u r e committee begins hearings on commodity trade legislation this week. Independent Agency The GAO report recommended that an independent agency be established to regulate all trad- ing in commodity futures in place of the agriculture depart- ment's commodity exchange au- thority Clark said the report is "a thorough and comprehensive testament to the need for total reform of government regula- tion in this area." The Iowa Democrat said the house already has passed legis- lation to establish a new govern- ment commodity commission, IWrand as DES MOINES (UPI) Gov. Robert D. Ray said he has all but ruled out his two top energy advisers as his selection to head the new Energy Policy Council. In addition, the governor said he may have to choose an "out- of-state" resident to head up the EPC if a top candidate cannot be chosen from within Iowa. The EPC, after considerable political bickering, was ap- proved in the waning days of the legislature to oversee the state's future energy problems. Up to this point, Iowa com- merce commission Chairman Maurice Van Nostrand and State Geologist Sam Tuthill have been handling most of the responsibilities that would now fall under the auspices of the EPC. But, Ray said he would rather have Van Nostrand and Tuthill remain in advisory positions to the powerful council instead of serving as director. The Best Carpet Buys Are At Carpetland U.S.A. but said the legislation fails to give the commission the in- dependence and authority need- ed to adequately regulate the futures market. Own Penalties "It is particularly noteworthy, that in addition to calling for a fully independent body regulat- ing all futures Clark said, "the GAO is recommend- authority to seek its own injunc- tions and impose its own civil money penalties, and that it also be granted authority to require exchanges to designate additional delivery points. The house legislation fails on all these points." Clark is one of four senators who introduced a bill calling for an independent commodity commission last December. He also requested the GAO to un- dertake its study of commodity futures in March, 1973. Man Found Innocent On Weapons Charge ELKADER (UPI) An Oel- wein man has been found in- nocent of pointing a gun at a Clayton county magistrate who alleged he pointed -the gun at her as she drove along a high- way. Clifford Hurst, 35, was found innocent in magistrate's court here Monday after pleading in- nocent to pointing a gun at Rosemary Tuecke, a Clay county magistrate from Gutten- berg. Mrs. Tuecke said a man point- ed a gun at her as she drove along the highway last Sunday and she backed her ear up and confronted a trio of men stand- ing near a parked car. She said she then drove on and reported the incident to authorities-. Hurst and two other men were arrested by Strawberry Point police later Sunday. Hurst's two companions, James Wetherbee, 26, and Martin Shirley, 22, both the valuations reduced. Com- mercial property in Mahaska county is reduced by 21 per- cent and by 12 percent in Decatur county. The biggest increase ordered was 28 per- cent in urban residential property in Dickinson county. In making the adjustments, ordered by Briggs, the county boards of review will have the option of'reassessing each parcel of property in the af- fected class, or by making an across-the-board adjustment of all parcels of property by the percentage specified in t h e order. The boards of review must publish notice in newspapers of general circulation of the adjustments made in compli- ance with the order. Affected taxpayers may appeal the ad- justment 'by filing a written protest with their local board of review. During the May session, the board of reviews may act only upon those protests filed 'by Monday. These sessions will cover protests stemming from earlier adjustments. After these sessions have been con- ducted, the boards of review in the 12 affected counties will be reconvened in special ses- sion to hear any appeals from the latest action taken by the state. Equalization orders to boards of review include: Dallas county, increases in rural agricultural of 12 per- cent; rural residential, 29 per- cent, and urban residential, 21 percent. Wayne, increases in rural agricultural, 19 percent, and urban residential, 20 percent. Warren, increases' in rural agricultural, 18 percent; rural residential, 22 percent; urban residential, 22 percent, and commercial, 19 percent. Fayette, increase in urban residential, 5.9 -percent. Buchanan, increase in rural residential, 19 percent. Dickinson, increases in rural residential, 27 percent, and urban residential, 28 per- cent. Kossuth, increase in rural residential, 12 percent. Decatur, increases in rural agricultural, 4.6 percent; rural residential, 10 percent; urban residential, 27 percent, and decrease commercial, 12 per- cent. Polk, increase in rural resi- dential, 15 percent; urban res- idential, 15 percent, and com- mercial, 10 percent. Mahaska, decrease com- mercial, 21 percent. Wright, increase rural agri-- cultural, 12 percent. Clayton, rural residential, 4.7 percent. adding that the route maiiipula (ions will result in higher costs for fuel, maintenance, replacing buses and paying drivers. The measure allows public school districts to provide trans- portation in any of three ways furnish buses and drivers, contract with transportation companies or reimburse parents for transporting the students to private schools. The Requirement The measure requires trans- porting elementary school chil- dren who live more than two miles from school, and high school students who live more than three miles from school. Wiley said some local districts "already are busy figuring out the needs" of non-public schools, as covered under the new law. "It will be hard to figure, because you don't know which o[ the three options or combina- tion of them the district will he said. According to state figures, there are about children attending public schools and about 43 percent of those (about are bused. There are about parochial and pri- vate school children in Iowa. Iowa City Cyclists wirephoto Four Iowa City Central junior high students have taken the current bicycling craze one step farther they've switched to unicycles. The boys are, -from left, Phillip Kirk, Jeff Lloyd-Jones, Duncan Stewart and Andrew Steele. Rules Preparation on Tax Package Launched By Handy Minkoff DBS MOINES department of revenue of- ficials, admitting there could be numerous "hazy" areas in the law, Monday began drawing up rules and regulations regarding the lift- ing of the state's three per- cent sales tax on food and drugs. The legislature approved a compromise tax break.pack- age in the waning days of the session that included removal of the tax on certain food items. The exemption will take effect July 1. Deputy Revenue Director Gerald Bair said the depart- Utilities Criticized For Cooler Shutdown CORDOVA, 111. The Izaak' Walton League in the Quad Cities Monday sharply cri- .icized the utilities 'operating the Cordova nuclear power plant on he Mississippi river for shutting down a new water cooling sys- :em five days after it was put into operation. The water cooling system has replaced a controversial system used to disperse heated water into the Mississippi. The spray canal cooling sys- :em was shut down temporarily Sunday to permit workers to ncrease the voltage of the canal !ystem, said plant superin- endent Nicholas Kalivianakis. The Cordova plant, located about 20 miles north of Rock Island near the Mississippi river, is operated jointly. by Iowa-Illinois Gas and Electric Co., Davenport, and Common- wealth Edison Co., Chicago. ment anticipates several ques- tions from consumers and grocers about what items will be exempt, but noted that the department expects that its rules will clear up most of the "grey areas." USDA Definition Under the' legislation, grocers will be required to use the U. S. department of agri- culture's food stamp definition for exempt items from the sales tax. It ia expected to save the average lowan annually.. Bair said the list would in- clude all food items such as fruits, vegetables and dairy products, but would not include the following: Meals prepared on the prem- ises, such as food at restau- rants or take out orders. Alcohol or tobacco. Pet foods. i Nonfood Items, such as- soap, dishwashing detergents or most household supplies. Prepared Foods But, Bair admitted "hazy" areas that will not fall in any. preset definition would spring up. Specifically, food prepared by supermarkets in special delicatessen or bakery shops may not come'under the sales tax exemption as well as foods prepared by restaurants but sold commercially, such as salad dressings. "There will be quite a few things we will have to clear up, but we plan to review what other states are doing Reciprocity DBS MOINES (UPI) The Iowa reciprocity board decid- ed Monday to allow Omaha truck drivers to drive into Coun- cil Bluffs across the river with- out Iowa license plates. The decision is a return to an agree- ment between the Nebraska iruckers and the state of Iowa :hat existed for about 25 years until March when a crackdown )egan on the Omaha drivers. Bill Mutiny Speclpllzlng In Diamond Remounting and Diamond Appraisals Mulloy Jewelers 229 SECOND AVENUE SE You're invited. Come see us at our Brand-New Spot Make yourself at home beautiful selection of ever- lasting artificial arrange- ments, potted plants early lawn and garden needs nice things for Mother, including lovely hanging baskets in sun or shade flowers. We'll be happy to sec ;and greet .our old and new 'customers, loo! OPEN: Dally 9 am to 8 pm Including Sunday Center Dorothy Nawport 350 3rd Avo. to Trinity Methodist and have done and draw from Bair said. No Problem Revenue officials, along proponents of the sales t a x exemption legislation, have maintained that most grocers in the state will have no problem in figuring out what items will be exempt at the checkout line. They argue most checkout clerks are familiar with the food stamp definition of food and that the regulations es- tablished by the department will be clear. Bair said most grocery stores in Iowa have the cash register equipment to handle the exemption, but some smaller grocery stores in smaller towns may have some problems. Separate Items many of the smaller; grocers tell us that they separate the items any- Bair said. ''Besides, the smaller grocers don't do the heavy of purchases that the bigger stores do, and the big- ger ones have equipment so- phisticated enough." Bair said a key to the defi- nition of exempted items will be the phrase "food for human consumption" which is specifically outlined in the legislation as not subject to the sales lax. "We hope to have the rules ready in a little over 30 and then they arc subject to the legislature's rules review Bair said. Manchester Council Airs Land Easement By Mary Helle MANCHESTER Four rec- ommendations by the Man- chester -planning" and zoning commission were discussed by the Manchester city council at its meeting Monday. Action on a recommendation by the commission that A. L. Anderson, owner of the trailer court at the corner of Stiles and East Butler streets, be given an easement of city property, was tabled until the next regular meeting. Councilmen refused to grant the easement recommendation as it was worded in the request. The phrase, "The continued right to use said property in the manner utilized and for such purposes as are related mobile home court could be misconstrued by future owner, council members said. Few Changes With a few changes that would clarify the meaning of the recommendation, council members said they felt they could approve it. Anderson, visibly disappointed with the added delay, said he had been seeking a solution to his problem since February. A survey made by Anderson revealed that 12 feet on the west, and 8 feet on the north his property on which some trailer homes are located, pre- viously thought to be in his land purchase, belong to the city. "I need some legal right to use this Anderson she said. "I bought a mobile home park. The city condoned it and licensed it. All I would like to do is'get the park for the purpose I bought." Parking Lots A resolution, annexing and zoning B-2 (business) land owned by Richard Jones, the William Acers subdivision, lo- cated on Quaker Mill drive and North Franklin streets, was passed by the council. A -preliminary drawing, sub- mitted by Baxter, showed how parking places for more vehic- les could be achieved by mak- ing changes in the area. Action was tabled pending arrange- ments for the council to view the property and given it more consideration. The ordinance pertaining to rezoning petitions was amended by the council. Effective on to June 1, a fee of and the re- quired legal publication must accompany 'all rezoning peti- tions. Prior to this there had been no charge. In other approval was given by the council to allow the contractors for' the city's 1974 seal coating program to begin on June 15, instead of the contract date of July 1. Ambulance City Mananger Garth Arnold was instructed by the council to inquire into the purchase of a back up ambulance for the city, of Arnold said he believed at this time, "this is the number one priority in Manchester." A letter from Josephine Coo- ley was acknowledged by coun- cil members. Mrs. Cooley said objected to the rezoning of the old Central school block by t h e West Delaware school board. While you're enjoying life, enjoy your Age Ancient Age Bourbon.The one drink so smooth, it perfects the perfect: sour. JlndentJIge Bourbon imiGiir KNin Boumw mm nr, moor mam imtiu nm en., num. t.i.   

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