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Cedar Rapids Gazette Newspaper Archive: May 7, 1974 - Page 7

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Publication: Cedar Rapids Gazette

Location: Cedar Rapids, Iowa

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   Cedar Rapids Gazette (Newspaper) - May 7, 1974, Cedar Rapids, Iowa                                U. S. Supplies Cambodians From Thai 'Supermarket' The Cedar Itapids Gazette: Tues., May 7, 1J74 Find Changes Theories of Early Life in Northwest By Surln Kuangdel SATTIIAH1P. Thailand (AP) This American-built dcepwater port is (tie super- market for the Cambodian war. Rice, lucl, medical supplies, cement, trucks, guns and am- munition all provided by the U. S. begin this long, perilous Journey from here to I'hiiom Penh to keep the Cam- bodian government fighting. Sometimes, some of the weapons, ammunition and fuel winds up in the hands of the Khmer Rouge, the Cambodian Communists. Lt. Col. Earl Harvey of the U. S. army traced the hook- shaped sea route from Thailand around South Viet- nam and then up the Mekong river to Cambodia. Six Days "Our loaded barges, primarily ammunition, travel from here to Vung Tan, which takes about six Harvey said. Vung Tan is a port on the South China sea, about lid miles south of Saigon. "Once it gets to Vung Tail the Vietnamese government provides armed escort up the Mekong river to the Cam- bodian border. Then (be Cam- bodian navy escorts the convoy to Phnom Harvey explained. He is in charge of surface transportation of U. S. military supplies from Satthahip to Cambodia. Most are carried on barges, but some rice and WIN AT BRIDGE By Oswald James Jacoby In an all-expert game South would go down at his three no- trump contract with no hesita- tion in play and no fanfare. East would win the first trick with the. ace or the king of hearts and lead back.the five spot. Expert South would play the 10 and the defense would collect four hearts and the ace of spades. An ordinary player sitting South might well rise with the queen and make his contract or he might have no problem to MOUTH k 653 83 4 A Q 7 4 WEST J 9 7 2 963 10874 EAST 49872 A K 6 5 1052 4 KQJ4 VQ104 KJ8 A J 2 lioth vulnerable West North East South 1 N.T. Pass 3 N.T. Pass Pass Pass. Opening lead start with. An ordinary East might well cash the ace and king of hearts immediately. Why would the export South play the 10 and not the queen? It is a matter of something called restricted choice. Sup- pose to simplify'matters that East plays the king and then the five. South knows it makes no difference if West holds both the ace and jack, but it matters if West holds just one of them. South also knows something else. If West holds just one he is twice as likely to be holding the ace as the jack. The reason is that if East held king-jack he would surely have played the king. If he held ace-king as was the case here expert East could be expected to play the king half the time ,and the ace half the lime. Thus, when he played the king he was twice as likely to be left with the jack as with the ace. medical supplies arc sent by plane. At present about 17 percent .of the supplies are sent by airlift. Lost July the U. 8. army here began truck convoys starting from Satthahip to Aranyapralhel. a Thai- border district opposite Poipet, a Cambodian town, to Qatlam- 1 bang, which is a major province of Cambodia, Besides ammunition, the U. S. sends trucks, spare parts, batteries, cement and medical supplies to Cambodia. The whole trip takes nine to 15 days by barge, according to Harvey. Quantity Fallen Before congress ordered a halt to bombing operations in Cambodia last Aug. 15, the surface transportation carried about tons of supplies a month to that country. But since then the quantity has fallen. In March only tons went to Cambodia, Harvey said. "It depends on combat ac- tivities in said Col. Charles Morris; deputy com- mander of U. S. army support Thailand. No American military per- sonnel have accompanied the supply convoys since August. All security is provided by Thai Maritime Navigation Co., a contractor for delivery, and South Vietnamese and Cam- bodian navy personnel, Norris said. Well over 90 percent of the supplies have reached their destinations, Norris said, ad- ding that only two barges of ammunition and other supplies were stopped by the Com- munists since Aug. 15. The quantity of supplies to be sent to Cambodia depends on Cambodia's ability to build up stocks at ammunition supply points in the country. Consuming Rate "Somewhere in the neigh- borhood of one month is about all that they can Norris said. '-'We supply at the rate that they arc consuming more than wo do in anticipation of building up any new supply depots over there." His command, the nerve center for all U. S. army operations in Thailand, also delivers supplies to some U. S. servicemen at Thai air bases, including the B-52 base at Utapao, a few miles from Satthahip. North of here U. S. air force personnel are stationed at Udorn, Ubon, Nakorn Phanom, Korat and Takhli. The U. S. and Thai governments have agreed to reduce U. S. troop strength Village Fences Itself Off VILLAGE OF GOLF, F.la. (AP) Residents of this tiny golf course community have decided that good fences make good neighbors. So they plan to build a chain link fence around the entire town. "It should stop some of the unauthorized traffic around said village manager Mark Gantar. The wealthy residents of this Palm Beach county town had considered the fence for several years but a recent crime wave made up their minds, Gantar said. The fence will cost about The village consists of 67 homes, 13 cottages and a golf course. The bidding lias been: 7 West North Kast South I Pass Pass Pass You, South, hold: Wlial do you do now? This Is n lough ono. Klthcr four snudesor llircu nnlrumu Isn ren- siiriiihlc bid. Or you mlKlil try rniicy lild of 'Iliiiiioiiils Hirer cIliliH. TOUAY'H QUESTION You do bid Hire" nolrump and your piii'lniM- hlilH four Iwnrls. Wluil do you fl" Answer Tomorrow hero to about by the end of this year. The U. S. government spent about million and took two years to turn this port Into the country's largest dcepwatcr complex. command, manned by about pcrson- nyel, has been the army com- ponent command to all. American units in Thailand for eight years. During Ihose years it has built four major road networks and strategic com- munication units In Thailand. Japanese-Built Ford Truck on Sale Soon DETROIT (UPI) The Ford Motor Co. will put its Japanese-built 1974-model Courier truck on sale this 'month, but, unlike its Mazda counterpart, it will not have a rotary engine. The truck is engineered to Ford specifications and manufactured by Toyo Kogyo, the manufacturer of Mazda cars and trucks, which are powered by the Wankcl rotary engine. Ford has no plans for the new engine in either its cars or trucks. Ford contracted with Toyo Kogyo in 1972 to sell the truck in the U.S. and since May of that year has sold more than units. "Wake Up" CAM, England (UPI) Seventy village children marched Into a nearby woods Wednesday nnd knocked on the trees In a revival of ancient custom. They knocked on the trees to rouse thorn from their winter's sleep. Ity Kldon Barrett SEATTLE, Wash. (DPI) In the urea known as the Han- ford Atomic Reservation, an archcologist recently found ar- tifacts that showed man lived along the Columbia river about years ago. In light of much older dis- coveries elsewhere, that date Is a mere toddler's step back in the history of man. But what the discovery did do was upset a fuw theories about living conditions in these parts back in those days. Kept Out Anthropologists have pre- sumed that the extremely hot, dry climate that prevailed in the Pacific northwest back then would have kept man out of such deserts. Now Dr. David Rice, a university of Idaho art-lie- ologisl working for a public power combine that wants lo build another nuclear power plant at Hanford, has unearthed in a layer of gravel man-made tools typical of others used by primitives in the region. liice, reporting his findings to the slate Thermal Power Plant Site Evaluation Council, said the ancient campground he and his student crew explored was where the nuclear plant's water intake .system would be built. The most recent evidence unearthed at the dig was a clay pipe made in Scotland, trade beads and a rifle cartridge. The Wanapum Indians had used the campgrounds as late as 1910. This band once dwelled along the Columbia from Priest rapids to where Kit-bland now stands. Further down, the diggers found a house floor that Rice estimated to bo years old. Still further, they found fresh water mussel shells which radiocarbon dating showed were gathered about 90 A.D. Game Tools At this point Rice said he had expected to run oat of cultural material, but he and his crew kept digging just the same. Next they found tools used to kill big game. Perhaps these were to years old. After that came layers of gravel formed during high water periods at the end of the last ice age. It was in the gravel that four projectile points were found. They were of a type that seemed to have appeared in the area shortly after the great volcanic upheave! when Ml. Mazama blew it's top and ended up as Crater lake In Oregon. That was about years ago. These primitive dwellers did not utilize the runs of salmon that are believed to have been in the'Columbia then, but must have subsisted on game. "It had been generally thought the Columbia basin would have been depopulated during this said Rice. "But our work shows that people were there and were not too handicapped by conditions. "I think we are going to have to revise some of our thinking about the effects of this period on early man." PROPERTIES OF OUR) TO ATTAIN PERFECTION JH The name's Olympia Beer. But our friends call us Oly. And if you've traveled around the country, we may already be friends. Or there's a good chance somebody might have brought you a six-pack of ice cold Oly to share. Anyway, we're here now and we think you're going to like us. Olympia Beer. You owe it to yourself. All Olympia cans and bottles arc recyclable Olyniplu Blowing Company, Olympln, Woohlnglon   

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