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Cedar Rapids Gazette: Saturday, May 4, 1974 - Page 16

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   Cedar Rapids Gazette (Newspaper) - May 4, 1974, Cedar Rapids, Iowa                                g 'Ilie Cedar lianiJs Gazette: Sat.. .May 4. 197-1 Authorities Worried Illness Traps Illegal Aliens RIVERSIDE, Calif. (AP) The tens of thousands of Mex- icans who sneak into the U.S. each month can dodge the im- migration patrols. But they are often trapped by a common problem: illness. The situation is causing con- cern among some authorities. During a recent flu epidemic a university researcher discov- ered 37 persons hiding in a room, all but two or three suf- fering from the disease and afraid to report it. In Coachella, heart of Southern California's vineyards, the in- fant son of a Mexican couple, in the country illegally, contracted measles and the parents were afraid to take him to a doctor. The baby died. Sufficient Number There are an estimated illegal aliens in Southern California, mostly Mexicans. The number is sufficient to re- quire a 300-bed hospital and 350 fation or wait and risk Ihelbe solved if unlawful aliens'dent aliens, including 65 illegals, child's life. To Cross "A guy who is here illegally is not going to stick his neck out if he is said Ron Quesada, Riverside's community relations I were guaranteed confidentiality 'if their status is discovered dur- ing treatment. But federal law says that persons who find out an immigrant is in the country illegally must report him or face felony charges with a pos- director. "Especially" some of sible fine and 5-year pris- these fellows who are smuggled sentence. doctors, but fears of being re- ported and then deported cause most to avoid doctors when taken ill. Some die when they could have been cured and others spread contagious diseases through the rest of the popula- tion. Riverside county, for exam- ple, has recurrent outbreaks of tuberculosis that officials at- tribute largely to farmworkers who are in the country unlawful- iy- "The problem does exist here, and I think we are ignoring the problem at. this says Gerald Shirley, program direc- tor of the county lung associa- tion. "If health care services were available for the alien, and he wasn't going to be deported, he would seek them out. Little attention has been given to the problem, according to a survey by the Riverside Press- Enterprise. Few Southern Cali- fomians 'are aware that every day numerous Illegal aliens are faced with an agonizing deci- sion: should they take an ill child to a doctor and risk depor-1 over here, who pay to b transported across the border.. You pay your money and then you end up sick and go to th hospital, and you get sen back.' This was obviously in th mind of a father of five in Lo Angeles who had been in Cali fornia two had severe ulcers. He began vomiting blooi jut refused to see a doctor. Fo: two days he bled internally refusing to go to the count; medical center. Finally, ht agreed to go to an East Los An geles clinic, La Clinica Familia de Barrio, which specifically as sures patients it will not asl their immigration status. "The man nearly said clinic administrator, Armida Duran. The incidence of serious infec- tious disease among illega aliens is unknown, but the rate for lawful Mexican migrants: with whom they work in the fields, is the highest of any seg- ment in the state. Urban Jobs Public health authorities are particulaly worried about con- tagious diseases because many illegal aliens have urban jobs such as housekeeping, cooking, food handling and caring for children, as well as rural jobs where they live and eat to- gether. "We may have a major prob- lem one of these said Los Angeles County Health Director L. A. Witherill. The problem seemingly would "In says an assista U.S. attorney who handles in migration cases, "I would ho] [hat doctors would contact tl immigration service and mal a report." But Vic Huerta, a communr health official with the U.S. d partment of health, educatio ind welfare in San Franeisc contends "the health of th community is more imperial han some guy's legal status." Clinics Agree Fortunately for the illega iliens, most clinics agree wil luerla. Seldom do they repoi aliens when they discover them "I suppose that in the somewhere it says we shoul report said the curren lirector of the Farm Worker lealth Service, Ismael Zarate 3ut he added he feels it is mor mportant the ilisgal aliens us fie health services. Hospital policies, on the othe and, differ. Many report illega mmigrants. The reason is thai nlike the free clinics, the hos itals are concerned about wh vill pay the bill. County hospi als don't want taxpayers ti ick up aliens' bills. Slim Chance Still, Santa Clara county': medical center estimates i ,25 illegal aliens a montl n hospital wards and another 211 o 30 as outpatients, at a cost o bout a year. San Diego lOunty estimates it spen in fiscal 1972-73 for mergency care for 224 nonresi- Believe K or Not! LEGAL NOTICES NOTICE .OF PUBLIC HEARING ON REQUEST TO CHANGE THE DISTRICT MAP OF THE 1INN COUNTY ZONING ORDINANCE, LINN COUNTY, IOWA AS ADOPTED JULY 14, 1959. TO: All citizens, owners of real property situated within Linn County and wlfrnout Ihe corporate limits of any city or town in said County and io sit persons owning or claiming any interest therein, all whom it may Concern: and to Notice is hereby given pursuant lo Sec- lion 358A of the 1973 Code of Iowa, and Article XXVI of the Rural Zoning 'ordi- nance of Linn County, Iowa, lhat fhe Linn County Zoning commission of Linn County, Iowa will conduct a public hear- ing In Room 103 at the 20th day of May, 1974 -at the Linn County Cour House In the city of cedar Rapids, Iowa upon the item hereinafler enumerated. Further notice is hereby given "pursuant to Section 358A of the Code of Iowa tha tne Linn County Board of Supervisors o Linn County. Iowa will conduct a public hearing in Room 103 at a.m. the 4th day of June, 1974 at the .Um County Court House in Cedar Rapids, Iowa on the Item hereinafter which the Linn County Zoning Compnisslon ei ther approved or disapproved. Request of carllon 0. Tronvold partner, C.C.D.T., partnersttip, owner 1 reby petition that the following proper t. tv be reioned froi Classification to "t. _ permit said property to Light .Industri, mit said property to be possibly___ for truck terminals, wholesale establish ments, or for warehouse or storage plants, on the following described proper 1y: of Section Linn County, Iowa and SEVi of Section 21-83-6, Linn County, Iowa -and Lot.2. Ir regular survey NEV< SWA of Section 21-83- 6, Linn County, Iowa, excepting therefrom that part of the SE% SWV rs that Pres- ident Nixon's Jchief domestic adviser at t'Se time, John Ehrlichman; expected them to reaffirm thejjr promise of campaign "in light of forthcomilig increase in milk price supports." "The leaders :did ie letter saj.d. The next cjay, March he agriculture 'department an- ounced a jjrice increase which resident sNixon had. ordered ersonallyiftwo days earlier, aft- a meeting with number; of dairymen. The Wl'iite House denies that romisesi of campaign money ere a factor in Nixon's deci- on to aise prices. It Etcknowl- [ges tiiat Nixon knew up to illion.Vnad ibeen promised, and lid ti.at "traditional political including pres- ure congress, influenced i price increase decision. Hie pledges of campaign nmiey tame from top offi- i'als of Associated Milk Pro- ducers, Inc., on behalf of the nation's three largest dairy cooperatives, which represent r'trmers who produce about '.ne-quarter of the U.S. milk iupply. The letter from the judiciary ommittee was madelpublic Fri- ay through the office of Rep. Jerome Waldie member of the committee. It came on the heels of a statement, attributed to a for mer lobbyist for Associatec Milk Producers saying top of ficials of the cooperative told him that the million commit merit had been Iriade "in con junction with the 1971 price sup- port" decision. According.to the letter, Ehr- lichman contacted White House special counsel Charles Colson immediately after Presiden Nixon ordered the price in- crease on Marclf 23, 1971. Col- son had been the principal con- :act in the White House for leaders of the milk producers. The house letter said Colson hen "called Chotiner, who had .eft the White House to enter jfivate law practice. At the ime, Chotiner was receiving a retainer paid by he milk producers. Of ficials ..of ,the milk produ- cers and other cooperatives met with Nixon on March 23, and then "engaged in all- night 'meetings at which they agreed to make political contributions to the Presi- dent's re election campaign and to contribute by the evening of March 24, house letter said. On the night of March ihotiner and a large number f dairy cooperative officials ttended a Republican fund aising dinner in Washington. Sometime that night, the ouse letter said, "Mr. Choti- er stated to several dairymen mt Mr. Ehrliehman; expected IB dairy industry to reaffirm s ?2-million 'commitment' in ght of a forthcoming increase milk price supports. The airy leaders did so." Chotiner died Jan. 30. His ormer law. partner, Marion Garrison, declined comment. The letter said the judiciary ommittee is seeking tapes of onversations the President had 'ith Colson, Ehrlichman, Cho- iner and former Treasury Sec- etary John Connally around the time of the price increase The White House has said Connally argued strongly in fav or of a price increase. There have been allegations, denied consistently by Connal- ly, that he received a or payment from the milk producers in return for his help with the price in- crease and possibly other matters. A former associate of Con Texas lawyer Jake .Ja- cobsen, was. indicted for per- jury and accused of lying in testimony absolving Connally; Friday, U.S. Dist. Court Jud: je George dismissed :he perjury indictment on 'tech- nical grounds. A Water- gate special prosecution force ieclined to say whether a new ndictment would sought, but egal observers believed it like- y Jacobsen will be re-indicted; Soviets Postpone Scientist Event MOSCOW The Soviet ;overnment has suddenly with- Irawh invitations to hundreds of Vestern scientists for the 250th anniversary, celebration of'the Academy of Sciences. Foreign diplomats said Thurs- day ffie.celebrations.had been Mstponed, apparently to head ff embarrassing discussions on intellectual freedom and Jewish migration. They (said the Russians noti- ied them the or May 14-had been put.off in- efinitely due (to the national ampaign for the June 16 ejec- ions to the Supreme soviet, the lational parliament. Soviet officials gave no ex- ilanalion Why they waited so ong to postpone the gathering although both the celebrations and the elections have been ilanried for more than a year. Chief of Oil Cartel Recalls Dishwashing UNITED NATIONS (AP) Dr. Jamshld Amouzegar mad some multi-billion-dollar oil de- cisions recently, but he born to the big money. Thirty years ago he moppe< restaurant floors and washec dishes while an engineering stu dent at Cornell university, Itha ca, N. Y., Amouzegar, finance minister of Iran, recalled. "I would work four hours a night, starting at 5 p.m. It was a good experience. It helped m remember the life of the ordi nary worker owe much o what I have to the liberal edu cation I got at Cornell and lale at the University of Washington in Amouzegar added. Now a wiry man of 50, he hai ieen president of the last five sessions of OPEC, the 13-nation Organization of Petroleum Ex )orting Countries! This is the cartel that recently triplet crude oil prices, raising the vorld's annual oil bill at leasl billion. Prime Mover Amouzegar was a prime mover in the increase, which upped Iran's oil revenues abou: 12 billion a year. Asked to defend the price aoost, his favorite theme is that cheap-Oil had encouraged "inex- usable, reckless waste" of a ifnited resource, and over- ffiuence and over-consumption n rich countries such as t h c U. S. Does he predict an end now to he comfortable, consumer- riented life made possible by heap ries? energy in these coun- "Fifst of he said in an nterview, bridging the ap between rich and poor ountries is a myth. There are imply not enough resources to o around for everyone to have le same rate of consumption as n the U.S. "Both sides should sacrifice a ttle, the industrial countries oo. I am not saying they should nver their .standard of-living, 'ou can have your good stan- ard of living with conservation, 'm not saying you have to reeze. But if you are comfort- ble..in your house at 70 ;rees, why heat it to 75? "Why "If it weren't' for cheap oil, ou wouldn't have "sealed-off [r-conditioried buildings, as .in few York or Washington. .Why otopen the windows arid'enjoy le spring and fall weather? "I'm not saying you have :to de around on camels. Drive our car, but slow down I'm ure the standard of living in le U: S. in January, 1974, after onservation began, was "not wer than in 1973." Low oil prices, Amouzegar aid, amounted to waste and under at the expense of future enerations, while higher prices re the most effective way to stimulate efficient usage and development of other forms of energy. In Iran, he said, it was neces- sary to raise the price of walcr to get people to stop wasting it. "We are a semi-arid country, so we told the public, if you want water for swimming pools, you've got to pay for it." The minister emphasized he was not born into Iran's privi- leged elite. Describing his ori- gins as "lower middle he said his father was a teacher and judge. Picked Up Rides "We couldn't afford a car or refrigerator. My father and mother sacrificed for me." In 1944, during the war, they sent him to Bombay enroute to school. He said he reached the U. S. by picking up rides on cargo and prisoner of war ships via Australia, the Panama Canal and Boston. had to work to pay my ex- penses Amouzegar recalled. "I got a scholarship only after a professor noticed me working in the restaurant and looked up my grades. There were no government contacts or anything like that. "This is the sort of thing this country provides for its youth, with your best recommendation your ability. I was a foreigner and they helped me. I have never'forgotten it." Trial of Four Indians Recessed to May 14 SIOUX FALLS, S. D. Circuit Judge Joseph apparently intending to give this ense town an opportunity to cool off, Friday recessed the rial of four Indians until May 14.. of the four, charged in connection with a violent dem- onstration last year in Custer, S. D.; erupted in -a bloody oourt- oom brawl, between Indians and law authorities.Tuesday. LAFF-A-DAY 'What do. you mean, -what happened? Nothing happened. I merely fixed myself some .Adyertl5.eniEnt For the Finest' in Paints TAKE THAT FAT OFF 'Use 5.10.25 orraore pounds of excess'- ;fat -.withoulmissijig a meal wilh' this Plan that can help you slim down." The X-) 1 Reducing Plan contains a liny tablet, easily swallowed, that com- bines ingredients to combat hunger Appease appetite. snpnenMU vita'' No strenuous exercise. Over SOU" ot X-ll tablets used all over jAmenca: Company founded in 192! X-ll Reducing Plan costs S3 larjc'-' size S5. Get X-ll now .YoSr .money refunded by manufacturer if you don't lose those pounds no cues-' ..lions asked. At most'drug stores Use the equity in your home for a Remodelinq Loan.   

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