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Cedar Rapids Gazette: Friday, May 3, 1974 - Page 1

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   Cedar Rapids Gazette (Newspaper) - May 3, 1974, Cedar Rapids, Iowa                                Weafher- Clear mill colder to- night. Lows la the mid 30s. Sunny and wnrm- cr Saturday liighs around 70. VOLUME 92 NUMBER 114 CITY FINAL 10 CENTS CEDAR HAPIDS, IOWA, FRIDAY, MAY 3, 1974 ASSOCIATED PRESS, UPI, NEW YORK TIMES ZEBRA SUSPECTS FREE Kissinger Peace Bid To Syrians JERUSALEM (AP) Secre- tary of State Kissinger held nine more hours of talks with Israeli leaders Friday then flew to Syria in search of a disen- gagement pact on the embattled FBI Raids Abandoned Headquarters of SLA SAN FRANCISCO (UPI) -imenl. They loaded two trucks Authorities Thursday night raid- and a car with large boxes and Golan Heights. Kissinger held talks Syrian President Hafez Assad Friday night. Kissinger said he and the Israeli leaders had studied "in great detail all ations involved the consider disen- ed an abandoned apartment ap- parently used as a Symbionese Liberation Army headquarters and found terrorist slogans scrawled on the walls signed by Tania, the name kidnaped Pa- tricia Hearst now uses. Police and FBI agents discov- ered clothing and other articles that indicated the SLA members lived in the apartment less than a week ago. Police found the keys to a rented car which the un- derground group used in an April bank robbery. gagement agreement. I will do my best to present the ideas that have emerged out of these discussions as honestly am clearly as I can. "We seek security and peace and not the imposition of the views of any party on any other Kissinger said, adding that his mission is aimed at "promoting peace in the area and ending the hostilities that are now going on." Later, a senior American 'of- ficial said he "can see the shape of agreement" on disen- gagement. But he conceded that. Kis- singer faced a much more dif- ficult problem for several rea- sons, among them Israeli settle- ments in the occupied area and a higher degree of "emo tionalism." Kissinger had a last minute conversation in Tel Aviv with Prime Minister Golda Meir be- and a car with large boxes and bags containing items found in the apartment. No weapons or suspects were discovered. On one wall was scrawled "Freedom is the bread of the people-Cin." On another wall was "Patria o muerte, venceremos. Tania." The slogan- roughly translat- ed, means "Fatherland or death, we will overcome." The name Tania was also Loaded Trucks agents removed thing but a bed from the apart- Day Resigns As Marion City Manager By Larry Tanner Fred L. -Day, Marion city tianager since last December, las submitted his resignation. Day, suffered a heart attack Jan: 23 and was hospitalized for an extended period. While fore flying to Damascus for his talks with President Assad. Shortly before Kissinger ar- rived in Damascus, Ismail madani. secretary of the Al- gerian presidential palace, met Assad and delivered a personal letter from Algerian President Houari Boumedienne. The con- tents were not disclosed but in a meeting with Kissinger Monday Boumedienne who has a close personal relationship with Assad pledged his support of the Kissinger mission. Kissinger was the target of an assassination plot on his last visit to Damascus in January, and security Friday was un- precedented. He also was trav- eling about the city in a second bullet proof Cadillac flown in from the U. S. A bullet proof car also was flown to Israel. As Kissinger and the Israelis talked, Israeli commandos struck across the cease-fire line into Syria Friday and killed two Syrian soldiers in a brief skir- mish, the Israeli military com- mand said. Gunners exchanged fire on the Golan Heights front in the 53rd consecutive day of did not specifically give health as a reason for resigning, it was fighting there. a factor. Day stated in his resigna- tion: "I consider each of you a dedicated official and a fine group of men trying to better the community. Marion has a dedicated group of employes and the townspeople are fine. "Marion is on the verge of great accomplishments so it is indeed difficult to terminate my city manager position at this time. However, I will leave city management field and possibly enter private business in an- other state." Day told The Gazette Friday morning, "Things are going so well. It was a tough decision to make. I don't feel I can really get back into the swing of things for several months." Marion Mayor William Grundy said: "We will begin to search immediately for a new manager. No date has been set for Fred's resigna- tion. We hate to sec him leave. He was doing an ex- cellent job as city manager. "We will continue to function at city hall until a new manager scrawled on a bedroom along wiih an unsigned slogan often found at the end of tape record- ed SLA messages: "Death to the Fascist insects who prey on every- the lives of the people." Eight SLA members and Miss Hearst are being sought in con- nection with the April 15, bank robbery and the shooting of two bystanders. "Suspicious Occurrence" The owner of the apartment wilding in San Francisco's Western Addition section had called police to investigate a "suspicious occurrence" at a third floor apartment which was abandoned last Friday. One woman who lived near the apartment house told KGO television that she identified an FBI photograph of the head of the SLA, as one of the persons she had seen in the area. "Cinque" has been iden- tified as Donald De Freeze, 30, an escaped convict. The apartment is not far from :he bank which was robbed by he carbine-carrying terrorists. Objects seized during the raid were sent ,to the FBI crime lab n Washington for analysis. 'the fa'se 'lafd, Meanwhile, the SLA face's-a deadline of midnight Friday night to release Miss Hearst or forfeit a million food givea- way to the poor. If Miss Hearst isn't released Friday, the money put in escrow by Hearst and the Heart founda- tion will be -returned to the foun- RELEASED Two of the Zebra slaying suspects released by San Francisco police were Tom ney, left, and Edgar Burton. Petersen Cut Off by Prosecutors WASHINGTON (AP) The was a potential witness against original Watergate prosecutors, Dean and should therefore sever in a crisis Of confidence over, himself from the case, the the leadership of Assistant At- sources said, torney General Henry Petersen, "What Happened" cut Petersen off from all One source said: "Dean dis- ulle source saia: uean ens- mat on gathered in tar mves- (ributfid he obtained tigation, it was learned Friday. from dation. Miss Hearst has said in taped messages that1 she does not want to return home and has elected to stay and "fight" as "Comrade Tania" in the ranks of the Symbionese Libera- tion Army, which claims it kid- naped her Feb. 4. continual contact with ne was collecting- information strictly for President White House Counsel Dean. Dean continually obtained information from Petersen relative to the investigation, saying he was acting for -President Nixon when, in fact, it was happening to denry, really, was that one ol :he principals in the potential obstruction of justice case relat-ng. to the .cover-up was using :he information from Henry Pe- he was passing such to further the continued tion to potential d_efendants in the Watergate case, the of justice." The. White House transcripts Tuesday show that in The prosecutors did not 1973, Petersen was having lieve Petersen was a part of with the prosecutors. conspiracy to cover up at that time had been gate. They believed he had by Attorney General unwittingly used in a Richardson to supervise conspiracy to obstruct investigation pending ap- 1 1 ImisyNM K s hired. Divorce To Escape Debt National Sign Co., Inc., of Ot- tawa, Kan., has filed a million suit against the Iowa highway commission in connec- tion with removal of billboards belonging to the firm from along slate highways-. The petition, filed Friday in Linn district court, also claims the -state statute under which By Roland Krckclcr A Syracuse, N. Y., woman con- tends a Marion optometrist ant his wife staged a plot involving a fake divorce to defraud the woman out of money he owet her. The allegations arc containcc in n petition filed in. Linn dis- trict court Thursday by Mona G. Phillips against Jo Ann Coil- ings and Franklin II. Ceilings, Today's Index Comics Crossword Dully Record Dentils Editorial Features Farm 2-1 2-1 3 3 0 13 Financial 25 Marlon 12 Movies Society Sporls Slate Television 23 Waal Ails who has an office at 1111 Sev- enth avenue, Marion. Gels Judgment Phillips obtained a judgment against Collings in Cedar Rapids federal court last month on a loan she made to him Jan. 20, 1070. However, she claims in her Linn district court suit, he has no money or property that can be sold to satisfy his debts. The suit seeks to have a transfer of iroperty from him to his wife Icclarcd void. Phillips filed a federal court suit against Collings on July 27, 1072, to collect on the debt, she illcgcs, and on Aug. 29, 1072, his 'long-lime wife" filed for n dis- solulion of marriage from him. Dissolution dissolution was granted Scpl. 4, 1973, and it involved n fell lament in which Ceilings igrccd lo convey to Mrs. Coll ngs lillc lo n outli of Marion. horse pasture The pclilion alleges Ihc dc- .stipulation on properly mil Ihe deed convoying Ihc Ihe billboards can be removed is unconstitutional. Half Century The company alleges it has been manufacturing, selling, in- stalling and maintaining adver- tising signs in the state for more than a half century. It charges the highway com- mission refuses to pay compen- sation by purchasing Ihc signs or condemning them, and that Ihe commission has merely given a 30-day notice to remove them as a public nuisance. The suit alleges that (he slat- ulc under which the billboards arc lo be removed violates the 'ctlcral and stale constitutions by denying equal protection of he law, and due process of the Rote by House Panel WASHINGTON (AP) Th Iious e- judiciary committee clearing the way for the cruel; phase of its impeachment inqu ry, has given President Nixon' lawyer a major role in the pro ceedings. Under rules approved unan mously by the committee Thurs day, White House lawyer Jame St. Clair will be able to questio: wilnesses, raise objections an' jpropose witnesses. The rules and- the Democrati majority's support of them helped restore harmony in th committee after its party-line split Wednesday when Nixon was found in non-complianc( its subppoena for Water law. "Destruction" (Conliimwi: Page 3, Col, 5.) The company says it is suffer- ing "economic destruction" be- cause of the highway commis- sion action. The suit states that (ho com- .iany tlocs business in all counties in Ihe slnlo and in- dicates Hint Linn county Is one of six in which billboards have been removed. The petition refers spcclficinl- ly lo n project involving high way 30 in Linn counly as being one in which the highway com- mission is acting In Us official gate tapes. Adoption of the rules market the final step in the long prep- aration for receiving evidence that the committee has been en gaged in since January. Start ing next week it will begin ex- amining the information on which it will base a judgmeni whether Nixon should be im- peached. Televised Hearings The rules include a provision permitting hearings to be tele- vised if Ihe committee decides to open them to Ihc public, -bail-man Rodino (D-N.J.) said the first week of the hearings would bo closed. Those first, four or five days will be taken up by a prcscnta- ion to Ihc committee of the secret grand jury evidence re- aling lo Nixon's role in the Wa- erRiile cover-up and "oilier in- onmilion covering a wide range of alleged presidential nisconducl. The hearing room will be fil-j ted out with electronic equip- ment to permit playing of tapes, so each of the 38 members has his own headset and set of tran- scripts. The role given SI. Clair makes clear that he is subject to com- mittee control and has no in- dependent right to be present. Desire for Fairness The Constitution gives the pointmcnt of a special prosec tor. Kept Advised The transcripts also show th Petersen was continually kee ing Nixon personally advised developments. Petersen referred obliquely t his problem with the prosecu .tors in a conversation wjt Nixon April 27 r "We had a kind of "crisis" confidence night before last, he told the President. Petersen went on to say th problem was over his reports Nixon, but the sources close the investigation said the re problem was Dean. "Dean is counsel to the Pre ident, for God's on source said. "He told Henry th President wanted the informa tion and Henry believed him. "Sever Self" "When the prosecutors foun out what Dean was doing wit the information Henry was giv ng him, the prosecutors tol rlenry he had to sever himsel from the case because he was potential prosecution witnes against Dean in an obstruction of justice. 'Petersen bridled at that. H took the position that Nixon am. Richardson wanted him to be there doing what he was doing." Eventually, a source said, th prosecutors had to resume dis tribution of information to Pe tersen because Richardson tol( him to continue supervising the case. house the sole right of impeach- ment, but historically counsel :or the subject of the inquiry has been granted some opportu- nity to participate. Rep. Kastcnmcicr chairman of (he subcommittee vliich drafted the rules, said hey were based on a desire to )e fair to Nixon. Rep. Railsback ranking Republican on the subcommil- ce, praised the Democrats for heir support, saying they had 'leaned over backward" to as- urc St. Clair's participation. However, some Democrats aid they felt 1hc committee ns being too generous. Rep. Danielson (D-Cnlif.) tried to liminatc St. Clair's right to aise objections. Full-Scale Trial Danielson said Ihe committee giving St. Clair the opportu- ily to turn what should be a net-finding investigation inlo a iling pnst impeachment pro- ceilings in which counsel for ie person under investigation vas allowed lo lake part, said it is. belter to let St. Clair ccome Ihc 39lh member of Ihe ommitlce than lo deny him his rights." trial. Hut Rep. Drinan Ervin, Baker: Dean Upheld The ranking Republican' and Democrat on the senate Water- gate committee say presidential transcripts largely corroborate Ihe sworn testimony of Dean despite White House claims that he is a1 liar. In separate statements, Chair- man Ervin (D-N.C.) and Vice- chairman Baker (R-Tenn.) said Thursday that the transcripts tend to bolster the credibility of Dean, At-a Philadclhpia news con- ference, Baker also said the committee's final report may be delayed beyond Ihe May 28 tar- get date because the transcripts have opened "new lines of in- quiry" including search for pospible perjury by Nixon's as- sociates at last summer's hear- ings. In Washington, Ervin de- scribed the transcripts as "re- vealing and astounding" and said they "very strongly corrob- orate" Dean's testimony. burglary, contrary given the'senate Watergate conspirator E Howard Hunt told the commit tee last Sept. 24 that he'an another member of the secre White House intelligence-gather ing'unit that became known as the planned Vtegas Publisher Hank Greenspun But, Hunt said, the burglar never came off. In the White House tran scripts, presidential advise John Ehrlichman said it did. The purpose of the burglary according to Hunt's testimon; was to get some information o Sen. Edmund Muskie which ire putedly would blow Muskie' fledgling presidential campaig out of the water. Orders Tapes on Wounded Knee ST. PAUL, Minn. (AP) A ederal judge signed a subpoena f r i d a y ordering Presiden feon to turn over any White House tapes dealing with the armed occupation of Wounded Oiec, S.D., last year. Judge Fred Nichol signed the ubpoena, which was prepared 3y lawyers for two American ndian Movement leaders on rial in connection with the oc- 'upation. Dennis Banks and Russell Means are charged in 10 felony ounts that include burglary, liefl, arson, assault on federal fficers and illegal possession of ircarms. Police Say Evidence Is Insufficient SAN FRANCISCO (AP) Four of seven men arrested in connection with a wave of "Ze- bra" murders here have been freed for lack of evidence, po- lice say. Police Sgt. William Kearny identified those freed Thursday night as Thomas Manney, 31, a star football player at San Fran- cisco State university in the early 1960s; Clarence Jamerson, 37; Dwight Staliings, 28; and Edgar Burton, 22. They had been booked for in- vestigation of conspiracy to commit murder. Further Procedures Kearny said the four were released because it became evi- dent "during the course of the investigation that no further procedures against them are feasible at this time." He said Chief of Inspectors Charles Barca planned a news conference-on the matter Fri- day. But formal murder and other charges had been filed against the three other men still in cus- tody Larry Green, 22; J. C. Simon, 29; and Manuel Moore, 29, police said. They are to ap- pear Monday before a county grand jury. "They just didn't have the evidence and I would say they don't have it in the other attorney .CAinton Witte of Oakland, represent- ing the seven black men. He said they were excused after a police lineup. "Death Angels" In Washington, D. C., Mayor Joseph Alioto said the four no longer held may be called be- fore a grand jury investigation of the random killings of whites and a possible connection with a mysterious murder cult called the "Death Angels." Alioto, who met with Alty. Gen.: Saxbe, said afterwards he had appealed to Saxbe to begin a federal investigation of the Death Angels, which he said were dedicated to the murder and mutilation of whites and dissident blacks. Alioto believes he Zebra slayings are linked to 0 murders throughout Califor- ia. Saxbe said he will help in any vay he can. Just before the meeting the "BI issued a statement saying t was not involved in helping to unt down the killers, but after- (Continued: Page 3, Col. 3.) Second Term ST. PAUL (AP) Mayor awrence Cohen has won a sec- nd term in an eelction charact- rized by light voter turnout. Jobless Rate Drops To 5 Percent in April Indicate Burglary Really Came Off Nixon's tape transcripts in- dicate Hint the While House plumbers did pull n Lns Vegas WASHINGTON (UPI) Un nploymenl edged down ii pril for the second month in )w, falling from a March leve 5.1 percent to 5 percent as blcssnesj declined among cnagers and black workers the government said Friday. After reaching a year low of 4.6 percent last October, un- employment rose to 5.2 percent in January and Febmary before starting down in March. The labor department's Bureau of Labor Statistics said (lie number of employed workers remained unchanged at about 85.8 million while the number of persons out of work fell by about to 4.5 million. rank and file workers decreased, in April. The average work week last month was 36.6 hours, which was 12 minutes shorter than in March. The average factory work week was 54 minutes shorter, with manufacturing overtime off by 48 minutes. The BLS said the shorter work limes probably showed up because the employment data was collected during the week when many work schedules were reduced on the Friday and Saturday preceding Easter. Because of the shorter work iveck, weekly earnings for rank and file workers averaged last month, a drop of 86 cents from March. The unemployment rale for teenagers dropped from 15 per- cent in March down to 13.8 per- cent last month, while the rate or black workers declined from 9.4 percent to 8.7 percent. The BLS also said the average vork week and pay checks for Today's Chuckle Little boy, on being in- troduced to an old friend of the family: "How do you do? My, how I've grown! May I go   

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