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Cedar Rapids Gazette: Thursday, April 25, 1974 - Page 6

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   Cedar Rapids Gazette (Newspaper) - April 25, 1974, Cedar Rapids, Iowa                                fcrtfef tnpitb Voters might grab candidate-pick power Editorial Page Thursday. Apr.l 25, 1974 musf sef A LEGISLATURE often lakes a lot of heat "for not doing a thing" when, in fact, it has done quite a lot of things many of which go unnoticed because they don't draw a big press. One such bill passed by the 1974 legislature, and which will become law July 1, requires state agencies, for the first time, to adopt and publish procedures that must be followed by persons who appear before them. As matters stand now it is vir- tually impossible to know what procedures must be followed, for example, in applying to have a suspended driver's license rein- stated, or to appeal the denial of a beer permit, or to do any one of the many things that require clearance by the state. Ordinary citizens were not the only ones befuddled when they tried to figure out procedures to follow before some state agencies. Even the lawyers who appeared in behalf of clients couldn't find out. Most agencies, moreover, couldn't offer written policies or guidelines of any kind to people who inquired. As one lawyer-legislator put it: "If you were denied a license for some ridiculous reason and asked to see the policy setting out thai reason, the answer usually was. 'That's.how we operate.' with no How goes congress? policy statement or set of guidelines produced." Under the administrative procedures act. departments now will have to set policies and publish them in a new Adminis- trative Code, similar to the Federal Register on the national level. This is one of the most im- portant bills this legislature has passed, even though it didn't draw much public notice at the time. OK on FCC WHEN lowan Nicholas .John- son left the Federal Com- munications Commissioi. last year, a cnuc asked, "Who will speak for consumers with Nick Johnson gone? Surely not Mr. James H. Quello, a' life-long broadcasting industry figure." The senate's confirmation of the Nixon-appointee Quello this week doubtless will evoke more nega- tive remarks. However controversial the nomination may have been in principle, though, the retired De- troit broadcaster's remarkable service-to-community record sug- gests that consumer-advocates should not sell him short. Few- nominees to key government posts have enjoyed support as enthusiastic as that accorded by nonpartisans who know Mr Quello. By Roscoe Drummond WASHINGTON Wouldn't il be something if the voters took one or both 197H presidential nominations out of the hands the politicians and gave .the nation new, fresh leadership? It is possible. It might even be proba- ble. One thins I tan report with as- surance: The mood of the country in- dicates voters are getting ready to do it. Tins isn't just theory. There is solid evidence to support it. A few weeks ago I invited readers of every newspaper- which uses this column In propose presidential candidates whom they would like to see enter the race. IMII- a poll which required people to write nut names, stamp and mail en- velopes, the response was substan- replies to date from every part of the country. None of the familiar can- didates who lead the professional polls came out ahead. The top three were Sen. Charles Percy of Illinois, John Gardner of Common Cause and Elliot Richardson, former attorney general. But the really explosive political fact which burst through this survey, as I examined it closely, is that more than half of those who replied nominated two or more candidates of markedly diverse ideology. This can only mean one most exciting and significant development and that is many citizens are prepared to put personal rectitude above every other factor in deciding how they will vote next time. This can only mean that the Democrats could nominate a conservative and the Republicans could nominate a liberal and satisfy the electorate if their candidates were men ur women of transcendent in- tegrity. The diverse range of candidate teams offered in the poll was Rockefeller and John Connally; Elliot Richardson and George Wallace; John Gardner and Sen. Henry Jackson; Ralph Nader and Henry Ford II and other unlikely pairings. It is evident that the liberal-conserva- tive dividing line is not the way many Eyeball to eyeball a thinking today when they come to decid- ing the kind of man they want for President in 197li. When I told a newspaper colleague, a political writer of national repute, what 1 was so unexpectedly discovering, his response was revealing in that it showed he had independently reached a similar conclusion without any basis for it except his intuition. "I'm he said, "by the findings of your poll because of a theory I have that heretofore has been supported by NO is, that the result of Watergate on the electorate may be a chemical change that will demand a turning away from the generation of politicians who have dominated the sqene for a decade or so toward a new genera- tion with some quality beyond party identification." This is clearly the message which this poll is sending to the Republican and Democratic parties. This conclusion by an experienced political analyst was echoed in hundreds of thoughtful, earnest letters which I received along with the candidate suggestions. These two sen- tences are typical: American people are sick to death of tired old politics We want integrity, intelligence and hopefully, vision." Angeles Times Svrtdicote Should U.S. aid to South Vietnam be increased? By Congressional Quarterly WASHINGTON Only one year after the return of American troops and prisoners of war from Vietnam, congress still is debating the continuing U. S. commitments in Southeast Asia. -The defense department has requested that congress allow it to spend an addi- tional for military aid to South Vietnam and Laos. Rut so far congress appears to be unsympathetic. On April 4, the house rejected the Pen- tagon's request.-Five days later, the senate armed services committee agreed 'with the house verdict. The debate is still far from over. The senate lias not yet acted on the bill con- taining the request for additional aid. and congressional consideration of the administration's new defense budget is coming up. In that budget, the administration has requested almost for aid to. South Vietnam in fiscal 1975, compared to a fiscal 1974 appropriation of million for both Vietnam and Laos. In addition, the President is calling for spending another million for post- war reconstruction aid to South Vietnam. Laos and Cambodia, compared with in fiscal 1974. Following are arguments for and against increasing U. S. military assis- tance to South Vietnam. The Arguments The Arguments 3 By Louis Harris The Harris Survey THE DEMOCRATS have opened up a 23-point lead over the Republicans in nationwide preferences for congress next November. The latest Harris Survey puts the Democrats ahead by 52-29 per- cent; the largest lead it lias ever recorded for congressional contests and larger than any actual result since the 19311s. These nationwide results mean that the trends evidenced in this spring's special elections are deep and widespread. Although a majority of voters says that Watergate is not the determining issue, closer analysis shows that it is indeed having a significant bearing on GOP prospects in the off-year elections. A cross-section of likely voters was asked in late March: "Does oil of what happened in Watergate make you feel more like voting for the Republicans in 1974, less like voting for them, or doesn't it make- much difference one way or the other in the way you will vote for congress this Most affected by Watergate in their vote intentions are persons who live in the West, young people under 30, skilled Feel more for GOP Feel less for GOP Makes no real difference Not sure 5 38 53 While 53 percent of the electorate say- Watergate will not influence their vote one way or the other, a substantial 38 percent say they are less likely to vote for Republicans as a result of the Water- gate disclosures. A rarity These reactions to Watergate are sig- nificant for two reasons. First, voters are 'traditionally reluctant in such' poll questioning to admit that any nnc issue is really determining their vote. The 38 percent who say they are affected by Watergate is an unusually high admis- sion rate. Second, subtracting the 5 percent who say Watergate makes them feel "more like voting Republican this it can be seen that the GOP candidates are car- rying a net handicap of 33 percentage points into the election just on the Water- gate issue alone. Insights Louis Harris labor, union members, white collar types, and those wilh incomes of and over. On the vote for congress, the cross sec- tion was asked: "If you had to decide right now, as far as this district is concerned, for congress this foil, do you think you will vole Republican or RCD. Derr Office-seeking is a disease; if is even catching. Graver March, 1974 29 52 19 January 32 50 18 September 1973 31 53 16 June 35 51 14 May 39 49 12 As the Walergale disclosures began to take hold last May, the Republicans began the 1974 race behind by 10 points. 49-39 per cent. In the latest reading, taken late lasl month. Hie GOP deficil had more than doubled. Among the most significant potential deficits for Ihe trailing Republicans are the Midwest and Wesl, 54-30 pcrcenl; the suburbs, 50-30 percent; small lowns, 45- 29 percent; among voters 50 years of age and older, 54-33 percent; among while collar volers, 55-29 percenl; among union voters, 60-34 percent; among In- dependents, 41-23 percenl; and among voters who are Catholic, 57-24 percent. Rather switch Among voters who cast their ballots for President Nixon in 1972, close to one in every three, 32 percenl, now says he plans lo vote Democratic this fall. Watergale obviously is hurling Ihe Re- publican chances, bul it is by no means the only issue. People are irritated over the stale of Ihe economy and are far from convinced lhal Ihe energy crisis was not conlrived by the oil companies with the help of the Nixon administra- lion. A Iradilional Democratic rallying cry, likely to be heard across the htislings this fall, is lhal "the Republican party is too close to big business." There is a Wa- tergate overtone to thai issue this year, given the illegal contributions some cor- porations made to the Republican presi- dential campaign in 1972. The future impact of Watergate will undoubtedly be affected by Ihe congres- sional decision on Ihe impeachment issue. But there is little doubt that at the present lime the Watergate issue raises the prospect of an unprecedented Demo- cratic sweep in next fall's congressional elections. Cltknrif) Trltjune Hew Ynrh Nrws Svnriicolo MORE THAN Americans died and some were wounded fighting for South Vietnam's righl lo de- termine its own future. Billions of dollars have been spent on the war effort. "Are we going to say that all those Americans have died in vain, all Ihose wounded have suffered in vain, or that all that money we have spent was in William G. Bray (R-Ind.) asked the house April 4 during the supplemental Vietnam aid debate. U. S. commitments did not end with the return of U. S. troops. Although there is no legal or written requirement thai the United States continue to provide aid, this country's long and deep involvement in Vielnam its heavy human and material investments have left Ihe United States with obligations. "We have committed ourselves very substan- lially, both politically and morally" to the defense of South Vietnam, according lo Secretary of State Henry A. Kissinger. The United States must help maintain the precarious military balance in Viet- nam by continuing to supply ammunition and replace equipment on Ihe one-lo-one basis permilled by the Paris accord. In the current fiscal year, the United States has fallen behind in replacing South Vietnamese equipment. Saigon's need for American assistance is nol open-ended. The next 14-24 months are Ihe critical period which will deter- mine whether.South Vietnam will become economically viable and be able lo deter a North Vietnamese offensive. But more is involved than a commit- ment lo one small nation in Southeast Asia. "The first line of defense is the word we have given to our Jack F. Kemp (R-N.Y.) asserted during the house debate. If the United Stales People's forum Why school not sold To the Editor: Recent letters have questioned the Cedar Rapids school board's decision to transfer Lincoln elementary school to Kirkwood Community college rather than accept a offer from a private The following considerations indicate why the board feels this is in the community's best interests. A professional appraisal indicates thai to replace Ihc Lincoln building and its site, the cost would exceed It appears accepting would not be as wise iis keeping the facility in educa- tional service as a continuing economic benefit to the community. Taxpayers of the Cedar Rapids dis- trict support approximately 30 percent (if Kirkwnnd's total property tax requirements. If Kirkwood constructed a facility approximating Lincoln's space from properly lax revenue for refused South Vietnam the arms assis- tance it needed to survive, the credibility of U. S. commitments around the world would be weakened. According to Deputy Secretary of Defense William P. Clements, "it is the- essence of the Nixon Doctrine and, in- deed, of American policy for the last quarter century to help our friends and allies to defend themselves." rpHE PENTAGON insists that it must i spend more money in Vietnam this ivear to counter inflation and the soaring rcosts of petroleum. "Who is going to pay the extra cost of fuel for our constituents? Who is going to pay the extra costs which will accrue to our constituents because of this extra spending by the Pentagon in Southeast Joseph P. Addabbo (D-N.V.) asked the house. The Gazette's opinion Billion-dollar sufficiency WHAT TENDS to be ignored in controversy over boosting military aid to South Vietnam by several hundred million dollars is that this is not a question of _ upholding or reneging on a national commitment to 'that country. Even if the no-increase decision holds, the U.S. will be honoring its obligations through a billion outlay to its former partner in war. That is sizable assistance by any test. It represents a huge investment of American good faith. Congress willingly has gone along with that much even if the proven upshot is not '.'peace." Also, it is doubtful that a failure now to increase aid as urged spells life- or-death for South Vietnam. More money won't assure survival; less will not assure collapse. If there is any problem, too, concerning U.S. moral obligations over there, the problem is not ours alone. America gave lives and wealth believing these were necessary to a self-determined future for South Viet- nam, in freedom and democracy. The Thieu regime's implicit moral obligation to fulfill that end has not approached reality as yet. All this buttresses the thought rtat in respect to U.S." aid, enough is enough and more is too much. The house' was right to let il ride. Cedar Rapids taxpayers would contribute about Although others obviously would benefit from use of Lincoln, Cedar Rapids' share for construction of. an equivalent facility would be offset by only from the private purchaser. Kirkwood records indicate that Cedar Rapids district residents participate in over (ifl percent of Kirkwood's continuing education programs. In satisfying the increasing demand far these, Kirkwood plans to use Lincoln for: Instruction toward adult high school completion, plus retraining and upgrading nf adult basic and technical skills. Teaching adult business occupational skills clerical, secretarial, office procedures, bookkeep- ing and accounting. Broadening career educational opportunities for secondary school students, with programs in health services, data processing, electronics and agri-business. The audio-visual component of training for truck drivers, with actual driving done elsewhere. Locating these programs at Lincoln will provide (rained personnel for suc- cessful, efficient operation of Cedar Rapids business and industry. In transferring Buchanan school lo the city of Ccrlar Rapids, the school dis- trict is incorporating n reversion clause so that the property must be returned lo the school district in case it is no longer used for city purposes. The Kirkwood agreement would include a similar clause insuring that Cedar Rapids tax- payers receive the economic benefits from any subsequent sale of Lincoln. Kirkwood has agreed to allow the community near Lincoln to use the facilities for Girl Scouts, Boy Scouts, Camp Fire girls, other youth or senior- cilizcn activities, and as a voting place for the 21sl precinct. A private purchaser might not... Lincoln cannot legally be sold lo any private buyer unless the people vole- permission. But, Iowa law clearly grants authority for a transfer to Kirkwood, which would then pay all insurance, maintenance and operation costs. Otto F. Wiedcrsberg, secretary Board of Education 3 Hi Second avenue SW Teachers' aides To the Editor: .As one of the many agencies In this community relying licnvily on the ser- vices of volunteers lo carry nut an operational program more effectively, The United States has a troubled economy and domestic needs to altend to. "Let's spend the money on our own Vietnam Otis G. Pike (D- N'.Y.) declared as his colleagues on the house floor applauded. Congress has recognized the need lo curtail U. S. aid to Vietnam. But the Pentagon ignored a congressional im- posed ceiling on Vietnam aid, overspent its budget and then came back [or more. And they will continue lo come back until congress puts an end to it. "Nothing we can do there is going to affect the final outcome; we can only delay it, and break our own bank in the Rep. Robert L. Legged (D- Calif.) argued. "If we help them do it. they can keep this war going for 100 years, by which time we'll be ready to be on the receiving end of somebody's foreign aid program." The United Stales through its mas- sive aid program is perpetuating .the hostilities in Southeast Asia. As long as President Thieu is assured of any amount of aid he wants, there is no in- centive to reach an accord with Hanoi. Thieu has predicted an 'imminent' of- fensive for months, most loudly whenever American aid is before congress. Not only has no such offensive occurred, but the only offensive so far lias been by Thieu Rep. Ronald V. Heliums (D-Calif.) charged. "Some Vietnamese have died in combat during the first year of our so- called 'peace with Rep. Pa- tricia Schroedcr (D-Colo.) wrote in a house committee report. "The Thieu regime remains rigid, oppressive and dictatorial, using American armaments to crush its political opponents, disdain- ing any form of compromise Congressionol Ouorterlv we at Nixon elementary school would like lo acknowledge Ihis as National Volun- teer week. Due to school redistricting lant year our school slaff was reduced and we were forced lo cul back on the use of paid personnel who served as teacher assis- lanls in the classrooms. We turned lo parent volunteers and came up wilh over 80 who have contributed an average of 300 hours a month in service lo our school assisting students and teachers here at school and doing paper-work projects at home to help us belter meet instruclional objectives. On behalf of our entire staff I would like to extend our deepest Ihanks to all these volunteers for their most valuable help. Bill Dwyer, principal Nixon elementary school Hiawatha Hacksville There's so much air pollution around these days that people are coughing even when they're not in church or at (he movies. Srin Francisco Chronicle   

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