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Cedar Rapids Gazette: Wednesday, April 24, 1974 - Page 9

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   Cedar Rapids Gazette (Newspaper) - April 24, 1974, Cedar Rapids, Iowa                                Never Too Late for Type A Sufferers By Meyer Friedman, M.D. and Ray H. Rosenman, M.D. We have spoken on scores of occasions during these past ten years to many thousands of physicians in the U.S., Can- ada, the United Kingdom, and Europe.The great majority of these physicians, presented (Fourth in a series) with the clinical and scientific data that have described so far, have been quite ready to accept the probability that there is something about Type A behavior pattern that makes it a major factor in in- tensifying coronary artery dis- ease and bringing on coronary heart disease permaturely. But then they frequently ask us a question that neither we nor anyone else can yet an- swer: Can you prevent the onset of coronary heart dis- ease in a Type A person if he changes or markedly ame- liorates his behavior pattern? It is the same question asked of cancer specialists: Can a heavy cigaret smoker avoid suffering from lung cancer in the future if he gives up cigaret smoking now? What is really being asked Is this: Is it too late to pre- vent coronary heart disease (or lung cancer) by eliminat- ing the agents that have been fairly well demonstrated to be inducing these disorders. Remove It The answer has been the same since the days of Hip- pocrates. If you find the cause or one of the causes of a disease and are able to re- move that cause without serious harm to the patient, remove it, no matter what ttye stage of the disease. This is the principle that makes physicians plead with alcoholics to quit drinking even if their liver is already enlarged. It is the same prin- ciple (hat makes lung special- ist urge even those of their patients who have already had a cancerous lung re- moved not to smoke. Acting on this same princi- ple, we strive just as hard to alter the Type A behavior pat- tern of a sixty-year-old patient who has already suffered one or more heart attacks as we do the Type A behavior pat- tern of an otherwise seeming- ly healthy individual thirty- five years old. We will never, never believe that it is ever too late to aid such a person by taking away one of the major causes of his disorder. In the next few years, large groups of type A subjects will probably engage in tests dur- ing which half will be given therapy and counsel in order to ameliorate or abolish their Type A behavior pattern. The other half will not be treated, and will serve as a control. This experiment will furnish the scientific proof many of our colleagues have insisted upon. These subjects then will be studied frequently over the, years. We are already con- fident results will show that those persons who do alter their Type A behavior pattern will invariably be the better for it..It will never be too late to do them some good. More Resistant We are sure that they will prove to be far more resistant to the future cost of coronary heart disease than their un- treated, unchanged Type A counterparts. In our own private practice during the past few decades, those who suffered a second heart attack or who died sud- denly were not the coronary patients .who reformed, but rather the patients who either could not or would not alter their Type A behavior pat- tern. Lutheran President Makes Peace Offer to Dissidents RICHMOND, Va. (AP) The president of the Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod appears to have offered an olive branch to feuding sides in a doctrinal dispute in the- 2.8-million member denomination. At a news conference Monday on the closing day of-the four- day convention of the Southeast- ern district, Dr. Jacob Preus said he was anxious to "place" seminary students who bolted in February from the church's Concordia semhiary in St. Louis. He said constitutional provi- sions would have to be met in allowing the students to return to the seminary but that "each side" in the dispute "has to bend." Certification The difference is that the re- maining faculty at Concordia would have to certify students for placement in parishes and the students would have to ac- cept certification. The students, along with a majority ol the faculty, since have formed a "seminary in exile, called and have refused to follow the dic- tates of the seminary's board of control, thus adding to the con- stitutional tangle of the doc- trinal matter. The district convention voted to continue funding seminarians at Seminex and io allow congre- gations to seek Seminex pastors through the district presidents Dr. Charles Mueller of Silver Spring, Md. No Schism Seen As .serious as the differences are' between theological conser- vatives and liberals in the church, Preus said he doesn't see the conflict leading to a schism. As far as doctrinal differences with the faculty are concerned, Preus said a background report indicates that "a great majority of the faculty did not have any serious doctrinal deviations or positions." Mueller, who has differec with Preus on the doctrina matter, says the church.prob- lems can be solved if the confu- sion over positions of power can be resolved. "Get People on Top" In essence, the church's ap- proach to control functions is congregational but also tied to doctrinal guidance from the go- verning body of the denomina- tion. Mueller said "once we get the people on top of the pryamitj and the leaders on the bottom, we can get something done." One of Mueller's responsi- bilities in the doctrinal dispute will be to seek accreditation for some of the Seminex students. During the opening days of the convention, delegates authorized congregations to seek new pas- tors from Seminex through Mueller. The action, which can be used only with seminarians from the district, is the only, way local churches could get around synodical dispute that prevents calls to non-accredited cler- gymen. 'Hi and Lois' Author Named Top Cartoonist NEW YORK (UPI) Car- toonist Dik Browne, author of the comic strips "Hi and Lois" and "Hagar the won the National Cartoonists' Soci- ety's Reuben award as the best cartoonist of the year Monday night. The Reuben award is named after the late Rube Goldberg, noted for his intricate cartoons on muddled mechancis. It takes only a minute to get the buy of a lifetime through want ads. Potted Aulimaled to outdoor tem- peratures. All American Awnrd winners and standard verifies of Hybrid Teas, Gtondifloros, Flori- bundot and Climbers. PIERSON'S FLOWERSHOPt GREENHOUSES INC, YOUR FTD FLORIST 1800 ELLIS BLVD. N.W. FLOWERPHONE 366-1826 Most physicians reviewing their own experience agree with us that it is probably never really too late to try to rid a coronary patient of his sense of time urgency or of his free-floating hostility. Before getting too far in this chapter, let us be candid about certain matters. First, in the majority of cases, Type A behavior pattern can be al- tered and altered drastically; and it is a terribly dangerous delusion to believe otherwise. Certainly any phenomenon that flourishes as does this pattern in certain milieus (the U.S., Finland, and England, for example) is almost nonex- istent in others (Yemen, southern Italy, and Africa, for example) cannot be ascribed solely to genetic predesti- nation. Second, it is probably a symptom of the disorder itself that induces many subjects suffering from Type A behav- ior pattern to believe that, regardless of their habits, they will still be lucky enough to escape the results. Head-in-Sand "Yes, I know that many of my habits are bad and they probably do cause heart dis- ease in a lot of fellows, but I'm probably not going to be one of those fellows." This is the sort of head-in-the-sand philosophy with which hundreds of thousands of mid- dle-aged Type A subjects now delude themselves. Third, no mass attack can be effectively launched against Type A behavior pat- tern until a major proportion of our medical colleagues not only recognize its overriding importance in hastening the onset' of coronary heart dis- ease but are willing to work to convince their patients of it. We do not mean to imply that most internists are not suspicious of the possible dangers of Type A behavior pattern. Most of them do sus1 pect that it probably plays a part in bringing on or at least worsening the degree of coronary artery disease al- ready present. But usually they content themselves with just advising their patients to "slow down" or "relax." In the last analysis, it is you, the Type A subject, who must accept the major re- sponsibility in wrenching yourself loose from the habits you may have learned to view as virtues. Of course we will try very hard in succeeding para- graphs to offer guidance and techniques of a kind that have helped others and can help you in freeing yourself from the thralldom of Type A be- havior pattern. But neither we nor your own doctor can force you to seek this freedom. It is you who must take the steps to liberate yourself. Root of Success? Many of you who now suffer from Type A behavior pattern have probably always consid- ered that it was doing you good in the sense that it was directly responsible for what- ever successes you achieved. To point out that, on the contrary, you have become enslaved to a rigid complex of stereotyped thoughts and habits that actually impeded your progress in life may at first glance seem absurd. But let us look a bit more closely at your life. First, review your suc- cesses. How often were they really due to Were you ever promoted or did you achieve success in your job, position, business, or profession because you did things faster than anyone else? Or because you easily 'became hostile or belligerent? We have questioned hundreds of men who have been successful in various economic or professional posi- tions. Not a single one of these men, when asked to deliberate a bit about the causes of their success, ever concluded that any component of Type A be- havior pattern had been sig- nificantly responsible. Copyright 1974 by Meyer Friedman. Reprinted from Type A Behavior and Your Head, with permission of Alfred A. Knopf, Inc. Distributed by United Fea- ture Syndicate, Inc. Next: Reengineering Type A Personality the SEVENTEEN by Bernard Lansky "My ambition is sometime to run out of deposit slips instead of White House Buffer Zone For Aircraft WASHINGTON (AP) The head of the Federal Aviation Administration says a new secu- rity buffer zone has been desig- nated around the White House to guard against intrusion by unauthorized aircraft. FAA Administrator Alexander Butterfield disclosed the buffer zone in a report made public Tuesday by Rep. C. W. Young Butterfield's report focused on the landing of a stolen military helicopter Feb. 17 on the White Souse lawn. The FAA chief said a new protective area has been desig- nated around the White House 'in which intruder aircraft will be reported to the White House security personnel. "This, in effect, establishes a juffer area to allow protective action to be taken if neces- Butterfield told Young. The' Florida congressman's of- :ice said the FAA would not tell low big the new buffer zone is >ecause the information is clas- sified. The Butterfield report ;ave no further details, such as low intruding aircraft would be spotted. Queen's Birthday LONDON (AP) Queen Eli- zabeth II's 48th birthday jrought out the flags on public wildings in Britain, but the tra- ditional gun salutes were post- wned because it was Sunday. Don't lose time locating a lost tern. Find it fast with a want ad. Dial 398-8234. Soys Origin of Life Easier Than Earlier Thought WASHINGTON (UPI) A noted biochemist has come up with new laboratory evidence indicating the beginning of life The Cedar Rapids Gazette: Wed.. April 24, 1974 9A Group Reports Steadying Of Gas Prices, Supplies WASHINGTON (UPI) Both I stations surveyed limiting pur- supplies and prices of gasoline from Earth's primordial en- appear to have stabilized over vironment more than 3 billion much of the nation, the Ameri- years ago was easier than previously believed. It suggests trial the chemical evolution of living things is an inevitable process when the conditions are right, said Dr. Cyril Ponnamperuma, director of the laboratory of chemica evolution at the University ol Maryland. "Perhaps on Mars things happened a long time ago anc perhaps on Jupiter things might be happening right he said at a news conference sum- marizing five scientific papers released Sunday. He said the most significant new finding he and his col- leagues have made came with experiments trying to recreate some molecules that led to life. They unexpectedly produced what apparently is a chemical sequence of acids used by prac- tically all organisms in the respiration process. "We have found what appears to be a metabolic pathway which had existed perhaps be- fore life Ponnamper- uma said. His work is based on the theory that the simplest living molecules were formed from Earth's primitive atmosphere of methane, anmonia and water by energy sources such as lightning and solar radiation. Ponnamperuma and other scientists have shown that basic Duilding blocks of life can come 'rom such conditions. can Automobile Assn. said Tues- day. The AAA said its weekly sur- vey of gasoline stations, cover- ing all states but Alaska, showed that only 2 percent were out of fuel, the same per- centage as last week, while average prices for regular and premium gasoline also re- mained unchanged at 54 and 58 cents a gallon. Federal energy chief John Sawhill predicted Sunday that prices will go up an additional nickel a gallon in May even though price controls will con- tinue on petroleum products after they expire on most other items next Tuesday. Highest averages were 58 cents for regular in Michigan and 61 cents for premium in New York. Texas had the low- est for cents for regular, 54 cents for premium. The tightest supplies, as in the past, were reported in the Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island and where more than 8 percent were still limiting purchases and more than 3 percent were out of fuel. The best overall fuel avail- ability, for the fourth consecu- week, was in a six-state area including Colorado, Mon- :ana, the Dakotas, Utah and Wyoming, with only one of 327 chases and none out of fuel. New York, Maryland, Dela- ware and Hawaii still have mandatory odd-even rationing systems in effect following Virginia's dropping of its sys- tem last week. Some major turnpikes also continue to practice the odd- even plan and stations along these throughways limit pur- chases, anywhere from to the AAA said. Ambush Misses Ulster Official BELFAST car used daily to transport Health Min- ister Paddy Devlin to his office was ambushed Monday and the minister's police bodyguard was wounded. Devlin, a Roman Catholic, was not in the car. Police said three gunmen fired 14 shots from a rifle and a machinegun at the police car which normally carries Devlin to and from his home. Devlin was in Dublin Monday on busi- less. The policeman who often es- corts Devlin was hit twice in the arm, they said. He was hospital- ized but not seriously injured. Police spokesmen said they feared the ambush might have been set up for Devlin himself. Catholic extremists bitterly op- pose the participation of Catho- lic politicians in Northern Ire- land's coalition government. Says Spiro Assured on Book WASHINGTON (AP) 'ormer Vice-president Agnew already has been assured ol more than for his nove and could get more than million, his agent said Monday. And, -the agent, Scott Mere- ith, said Agnew is committee contract to visit England for ive days .to promote the novel 'A Very Special m its publication there by W. H Allen, Ltd. Meredith said the visit coulc come as early as next January r February if Agnew completes he book by September as he lopes to, or as late as May i Agnew writes up .to his contrac ual deadline in December. General Figures Meredith has periodically is ued reports on new contracts or the book, always giving gen ral rather than exact figures MI the amount Agnew would re :eive. In addition to the British con ract, he said contracts ha( >een signed for Japanese publi- cation by Hayakawa Shobo, ortuguess publication by Newsday Higher GARDEN CITY, N. Y. (UPI) The newsstand price of News- lay, the Long Island newspa- cr, went from 10 to 15 cents a opy Monday, and the weekly ate for home delivery of the ewspaper is now 15 cents iigher. MULEKOFFS ef for (MM. Drapery Depr., 2nd Floor'. Open Thursday 9 'til 9 Sale ends Sat. Only.3 Days left to Save 20% on fashionable slipcovers and throws ALL MACHINE WASHABLE DRY ABIE, NO IRONING NEEDED IBSntpAimChiin W WHO'Tank dnhion 1C T Cushion Cluiri CMin IW wmi Io Dicta 6J" to bub 25" Io 53 El 3-Squart 31 Salts Cushion Save 20% on that tlipeavens DANBURY: a traditional floral with a bird motif in red and gold. NEW QUINCY: a vibrant Jacobean floral print in. blue and red. LUNAR: a textured solid in brown, melon, olive, gold, and blue. Save 20% on fftua throws: CARNIVAL in rust, olive, blue brown, .gold DORSET in red, gold STYLE 40, reg. reg. 43, reg. 45, reg. 58, reg. 59, reg. SALE STYLE. 52, reg. 53, reg. 48, reg. 82> reg. 60, reg. .51, reg. .SALE Moraes, Greek publication by Labrakis Press and Flemish se- rialization by the Brussels news- paper De Post. He said Spanish, Brazilian and French offers had been turned down, but that he an- ticipated signing 20 more foreign contracts. Movie rights have not been sold. Asked about the. monetary fig- ures, Meredith replied, some countries over The British and German con- tracts definitely "But in France nobody's ever got over No German contract has been signed. He said tha U. S. contract, with Playboy Press, was the; highest, which would put it over He put the contract for U.S. serial rights with Ladies Home Journal at over and said, "In total, this book could bring more than In England, Agnew is to ap- pear on television, -hold news conferences and meet publish- ing executives as part of the 'In promotion of the novel, an ac- count of a vice-president a dec- ade in the future who becomes the dupe of Iranian militants seeking a confronta- tion. Asked if Agnew's probation would interfere with plans for the trip, Meredith said, "That's a good question. I never thought of that when we signed the contract. He said he would be glad to do this." Agnew was put on three years' unsupervised probation when he pled no contest to a felony charge, of federal income tax evasion last October. The clerk of the U. S. district court in Baltimore, Paul Schlitz, said that Agnew's passport was not picked up and that he was not required to report to a pro- bation officer, so there should be no restriction on his travel- ing abroad. A spokesman at the British embassy here said he could see- no problem in Agnew's visiting Great Britain. MULEKOFFS Open Thursday Q 0 ft tO H p.m. 3rdAve.atlstSt.SE In Downtown Cedar Rapids Spring Special! Nylon Oval Braid Rugs Give Your Instant Beauty Will Make an Ideal Mother's Day Gift' Authentic Colonial Styling 30 inch by 54 inch Size 3 ft. 6 inch by 5 ft. 6 inch Size 5 ft. 6 inches by 8 ft. 6 inch Size S3995 8 ft. 6 inches by 11 ft. 6 inch Size AH Sizes Approximate These quality, Early American style nylon oval braid rugs makes an Ideal and practical gift for the home. They give style as well as beauty to any home. May be used in any room. Choose from red, green, gold, blue, brown and rust colors. Long wearing and washable. Add new beauty and comfort to your home now. Buy one or a group Using Park and Shop Plan. TERMS T0 YOUR BUDGET   

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