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Cedar Rapids Gazette: Tuesday, April 23, 1974 - Page 8

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   Cedar Rapids Gazette (Newspaper) - April 23, 1974, Cedar Rapids, Iowa                                8 The Cedar Rapids Gazette: Tues., April 23, 1974 Diet Cuts Type A, Smoking Risks By Meyer Friedman, M.D. and Ray H. Rosenman, M.D. Assuming that you are not suffering from one of the cer- tain causes of coronary artery and hear! disease (and luckily most of you and also assuming that you are a youngish man (that is, under we can declare categori- cally that if ALL our instruc- of a Series tions in this chapter and the rest of the book are METICU- LOUSLY heeded and followed, your chances of suffering a heart attack before you are in your 70s or 80s will be very slim indeed! If all Americans from birth had NEVER smoked cigarets. and if they had never suc- cumbed to Type A Behavior Pattern, this chapter would be superfluous. There is not one bit of evi- dence now available .to in- dicate that a non-diabetic, non-hypertensive individual who has NEVER smoked ci- garets and who always has been and remains a Type B subject, will ever get coronary heart disease just by ingesting a diet rich in cholesterol and animal fat. What we are saying is that dietary cholesterol and animal fat BY THEMSELVES proba- bly do not cause coronary heart disease, but if they are teamed up with excess cigaret smoking (that is, over 10 ci- garets per or the severe Type A Behavior Pattern, they may become deadly. Can't Recall Indeed, in our own experi- ence we cannot remember, more than a handful of per- sons who ever reached the age of 60 without suffering from coronary heart disease, hypertension, or lung cancer if they (1) had smoked more than 20 cigarets a day. (2) had exhibited the SEVERE form of Type A behavior, and (3) ingested a diet rich in cholesterol and animal fat. Since well over half of all urban Americans either smoke excessively or exhibit Type A Behavior Pattern, it seems to us to make good sense to advocate food habits that will ensure that these ad- dicted or afflicted persons will not be compounding the in- sults to their coronary arte- ries. But you may ask, "Suppose I quit smoking and rid myself of my Type A behavior. Need I still change my food We believe you still must make the change be- cause your arteries have probably already been injured by the tobacco or behavior pattern. We've known patients who developed coronary heart dis- ease ag much as a decade after they gave up excessive cigaret smoking, just as we've known many who have died of lung cancer many years after they gave up the habit that caused the cancer, namely that same smoking of ci- garets. Low as Possible The first objective of any dietary regimen for preven- tion of coronary heart disease is to keep the serum choles- terol level of a person AS LOW AS POSSIBLE, not just at the so-called American nor- mal level. We again stress this point because, whereas the so- called normal serum choles- terol level of the average adult American is generally considered to be any value under 275 and that of the person under 21 any value under 200 mg.-lOOml., these levels are probably not low enough to be safe. Ideally, an adult's choles- terol level should be the same as that of persons of other races who never get coronary heart disease. Such a value would be approximately 150- 175 mg.-lOO ml. The second objective is to furnish a sufficent amount of not only protein, fat and car- bohydrate, but also of the nec- essary minerals and vitamins. The third objective of any dietary regimen is that- the regimen be one that- is simple to follow and doesn't require a Table i AiTOcmM.YrE COMPOSITION OF VARIOUS FOODS" Type of Food Cholesterol Fill Protein Carbohydrates Susan Calories (mg.peroz.) (g. per oz.) (g. per oz.) (g. per oz.) (g. per oz.) (per or.) A. Meats Pprk Beef Lamb Veal Organs (e.g., liver) B. Most fshi C. Crab Lobster Clams Shrimp D. turkey) E. Dairy Whole milk Low-fat milk Skim milk Buttermilk Crearn 34 Buttter 1 180 Cottage cheese (uncreamed) F. (i whole) 68 G. 16 H. Fruits I. Nuts J. Breakfast cereals o Bread 82 Cake 25 Cookies 35 5 7 2 22 15 159 94 All.values given represent those for raw foods. T Certain fish (e.g., salmon and cod) contain more fat and cholesterol I The avocado and olive are much richer in fat than most other vegetables. Table 2 A DAILY DIET PLAN SUFFICIENTLY Low LV Total Daily Amount Type ol Food Approx. Cholesterol Fat Protein (mg. per day) (p. per day) {g. per Approx. Carbohydrates Calories (y. per day) per A. 2 servings lean meat, fish or B. 4 servings C. 2 servings D. 2 glasses skim E. 2 slices F, G. H. One serving of Dailij All values given represent wcicht as raw foods. T Includes 2 tablespoons of oil dressing. J Includes margarine in foods. A. A'cL'cr Eat These Foods 3. Egg yolks 2. animal organs, including rw 3. All sausages, including wieners 4. All shellfish, particularly shrimp 5. Butler, cream, ice cream, or foods containing these 6. Cheeseburgers, pizza. 7. All cheeses except uncreamed cottage cheese and cheeses specially processed to be cholesterol free 8. Almost all cooked hors d'npiivres B. Restrict four Intake of These ns Much an Fosxihlc 1. Sugars, syrups, jelly, linncy 2. Candy Cookies 4. Cakes, except angel fond cake C. Eat as You Like Your Bathroom Scales Approcc 1. All vegetables 2. All vegetable oils ;j. All nuts, except cnt-muit 4. ligp whites 5. Skim milk, buttermilk, yojiiil slide rule or a computer io un- derstand. Fourth Objective The fourth objective is to present foods that are as at- tractive and tempting as the ones they are replacing. It is this last objective that scores of dietitians, having satisfied themselves of the accuracy of their calorie and vitamin re- quirements, completely ig- nore. First, let us look at foods you usually eat and see how much cholesterol, fat, protein, carbohydrates and simple sugars they contain. Table 1 gives the approxi- mate amount of these consti- tutenfs, and also their approx- imate calorie values. Obvious- ly, some vegetables and fruits will have more protein, fat, or carbohydrates than others, but for purposes of simplifi- cation we have calculated the AVERAGE composition of commonly eaten foods. Of course, if you only eat avocados, our fruit values will not be of much help to you. On the other hand, if endives are your vegetable, our vege- table values will also be mis- leading. (For those of our readers who .wish an exhaustive, very detailed and beautifully me- ticlous handbook of food val- ues, we recommend that they purchase Agriculture Hand- book No. 8, COMPOSITION OF FOODS, for from the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Of- fice, Washington, D.C. 20402. This is truly a treasure for the person who wishes to know the energy-producing compo- nents and mineral and vi- tamin composition of each specific foodstuff.) Typical Serving Table 2 depicts the composi- tion and caloric value of typical serving of various foods (some admittedly on the spare If you are wiiiiiig to follow our recommendation of a low cholesterol, low ani- mal fat diet, you can see that some of these foods for ex- ample animal organs, shell- fish, and eggs just won't do for you. Table 2 gives a general daily food regimen that is low in cholesterol and animal fat. It calls for two servings of trimmed lean meat, fish or fowl each day. Admittedly a meat, fowl or fish serving weighing five ounces' un- cooked isn't large, but it is moderately appeasing. Preferably seven or more of these 14 servings per week should be of any kind of fish except shellfish.Fish contains pblyunsaturated fats while meat contains the possibily dangerous saturated fats. And, while on the subject of fats, we would like you to know that no vegetable fat that is. polyunsaturated fat- ever LOWERS your Wood cho- lesterol. The best that can be said for it and this is not that it does hot ELEVATE your blood choles- terol. Animal fats do. Not a Trace Also, when you eat any ani- mal fat, you also consume the cholesterol dissolved in it. Vegetable fats, on the other hand, contain not even. the slightest trace of cholesterol. But you cannot counteract the possible harmful effects of eating either cholesterol or animal fats by swallowing extra corn or safflower oil. Please remember that. We have had more than one patient who believed that, if he fried his eggs in corn oil, the corn oil would protect him against the cholesterol in the yolks. We wish such protec- tion was a fact but unfortu- nately it is a fantasy. How religiously should you follow the diet we have pre- sented? You should follow it moderately conscientiously, but never to the point of fa- naticism. The most important goal to keep in mind is the TOTAL amount of cholesterol consumed daily, rather than any particular food ingested. For example, if you should desire on any particular day to eat some ice cream or but- ter or wish to drink a glass of whole milk, then do so. But then cut down your meat or fish ration so your total intake of cholcsttrol on that day still falls below 300 milligrams. (Copyright (c) 1974 by Meyer Friedman. Reprinted from TYPE A BEHAVIOR AND YOUR HEART, with the permission of Alfred A. Knopf, Inc., Distributed by United Feature Syndicate, Inc.) Next: General Guidelines for Type A's. Millsap Appeals Court Decision On Suspension Kenneth Millsap has appealed a Linn district court decision upholding his demotion from Cedar Rapids police detective lieutenant to detective and his suspension for 60 da.ys without pay. A notice of appeal of the deci- sion made by Judge Robert Os- mundson last week was filed Monday in district court. The city civil service commis- sion imposed the disciplinary action Aug. 30 in connection with a March 19, 1973, incident. Millsap, who was off duty at the time, was arrested for intoxica- tion and resisting arrest. For- mal charges were not brought against him. He was suspended indefinite- ly by then Police Chief Georgi Matias. The commission latei found there was insufficient evi dence to show lie was intoxicat ed. Family Lost in Fire, Man Asks TV Safety WASHINGTON (AP) A Wasau, which handles Zenith's Runway Work Is Resumed at C. R. Airport Preliminary work got under way Monday in the Cedar Rapids airport resurfacing proj ect after a winter's recess. According to airport engineer- ing consultant Harold Miller, one diagonal runway was barricad- ed off Monday. He said that concrete remova and patching work is to be ac- complished this week and thai repaving is to begin next week, weather permitting. Some storm sewer work also will be started .this week. The runway project is expect- ed to be completed by the end of the summer. Counselors Attend Navy Conference Five counselors from Cedar tepids high schools attended he navy's "Training for Oppor- unity" conference in San Diego April 10-13.. The group received a first-hand look at the navy's recruit training, vocational in- struction, and management ori- entation programs. Attending from Cedar Rapids were Don Bergman, Washing- ton; Steven A. Dinger, Jeffer- son; Jack Garry and Lanny D. Peterson, both of Kennedy, and Harold Primrose, Washington. New Jersey man whose family was killed in a house fire urged the government Tuesday to move with "all deliberate speed" io protect others from television sels that can burn, fa- tally shock people or explode. Peter B. Young, who was cri- tically burned in a blaze that claimed his wife, 20-month-oId daughter and mother-in-law, was the lead-off witness at a Iwo-day public hearing before the U. S. Consumer Product Safety Commission. "Seems Likely" He said it "seems quite like- ly" to him that a faulty TV set started the fire in his Summit home on the night of Jan. J, 1973, as well as two succeeding fires in neighboring Roselanci and North Caldwell that took 11 more lives. "The only way this whole ghastly thing can have any meaning is if it helps other peo- ple avoid our Young said in an interview. "Let's learn from it, for God's sake. A lot of families can be saved by what we're trying to do here." Young said Must Believe SLA Threat Is Real: FBI liability coverage, said it ap- SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) peared the Young fire broke out The FBI says it "can't take the the commission must develop mandatory federal safety standards for the manu- facture of new TV sets and somehow make safe the 45 mil- lion sets already in use. He suggested that the in- dustry be required to place a simple shut-off switch on the cords of old sets across the country and broadcast public warnings. Until .the government acts, he said in prepared testimony, "I will stand by my advice to citi- zens and friends to pull the jlug, especially at bedtime, or even any time when the set is not in use." Makers' Denial Zenith and RCA, manufac- turers of the sets Young as- sociated with the New Jersey 'ires, have denied that their iroducls caused the blazes. Nathan W. Aram, Zenith vice- president for consumer affairs, said .there was "absolutely no evidence" .that a Zenith set :aused the Young fire. He said an investigation by loy A. Martin Associates, Inc., m insurance investigating firm or Employers Insurance of in the opposite side of the room from where the TV set was located. The Martin report, based upon fire department photo- graphs and inspection of the damaged home, suggested the fire originated from otherj causes. But Young said that, at least in his case, "I have no knowl- edge of any independent inves- tigation conducted by the manu- facturers of my set." He said he plans 1o tile a "seven-figure" lawsuit soon. He said the government's es- timate of TV-related fires annually is "in the ballpark." Grain Service Board Chosen Eleven directors have been elected to the board of the Cedar Rapids Chamber of Com- merce Grain Service, Inc., Chamber President John C. Rice announced Tuesday. Rice also said the annua' meeting of the Grain Service; including election of officers, will be held May 7 at p.m. at the Chamber of Commerce. Elected to one-year terms were George W. Lawrence, Dwayne Monroe, Richard Lon- geway, Arnold Blachfelner, Ray Larson, Tudor Wilder, Guy Ames, Richard Widmer, Rich- ard Ryan, Kenneth Hastie, anc Robert Faxon, of the Chamber staff. The Grain Service, a sub- sidiary of the Chamber, super: vises grain inspection and of- ficial weight services needed by grain processing industries. All cars of grain must b'e bought or sold on official grades which de- termine the purchase price. Members of the board of the Grain Service are elected by the Chamber board of directors. Appeals Court Allows Ore Plant To Reopen SILVER BAY, Minn. (AP) The employes of Reserve Mining Co. began rushing back to their jobs early Tuesday saved from the unernploymen rolls by a temporary cour order which puts the iron ore manufacturer back in business. The order was issued late Monday night in Springfield, Mo., by a three-judge panel of the 8th U.S. circuit court of appeals. The panel stayed a lower court ruling which or- dered Reserve shut down until May 15, when it said the full circuit court would hold a hearing to determine whether to allow the company to con- tinue operating while a full appeal is heard. The Saturday ruling by U.S. District Judge Miles Lord in Minneapolis ordered Reserve's huge iron ore processing plant at Silver Bay shut down at a.m. Sunday because of pollu- tion into Lake Superior. Reserve, which is owned joint- ly by the Republic and Armco steel companies and produces 15 percent of the iron ore used in the nation's steelmaking blast furnaces, also closed its taconite mine at Babbitt, 47 miles inland from here, at a.m. Sun- day. And suddenly per- sons were out of work and the two small towns faced the pros- pect of becoming little more than welfare centers. It was exactly 48 hours later when BUI Pierson's truck rolled through the gate of Re- serve's Silver Bay plant. Pier- son, the first worker to return to work Tuesday, yelled at a guard, "Hey, did you hear the good He kept on driv- ing. "Boy, I'm glad to see said the next man in. "A lot of the people I saw downtown today were pretty depressed wondering where the next pay- check was coming from." First to arrive' at the plant were foremen and superin- tendents to prepare it for pro- duction. Company officials said hey expected operations to be >ack to normal before the day s out. And critics said that meant .he company would again be louring tons of rock wastes a day into Lake Superi- Killer Typhoon TOKYO (AP) A spring storm that expanded to typhoon jroportions as it moved across Japan Sunday killed eight per- sons and injured 44, police said. Two other persons were report- ed missing. chance" the two latest mes- sages purported to be from the Symbionese Liberation Army and which threaten to kill poli- cemen if SLA members are harmed are not authentic. The messages, signed by a "General do not reflect the usual pattern of the terrorist group. They were received Mon- day by the Sacramento Bee, and said five California peace officers would be executed for any SLA member killed. John Reed, agent in charge of the Sacramento FBI office, said the FBI cannot assume the messages received by the Bee are not the real thing. "Since the life of the victim is still in jeopardy and the lives of police officers are in jeopardy, we can't lake that Reed said. The messages, one in pencil and the other on a tape, were sent by mail to the Bee in a brown manila package with a Berkeley postmark. "The Symbionese Liberation Army will not allow itself to be slaughtered by the Fascist forces who suppress us the penciled letter said. "We therefore issue this warning: Five California law enforcement officers be executed for every SLA member murdered. Take Heed. This order will be enforced." The voice tape said, in part, "Do not think that by elimin- ating a few of our members that you can destroy our movement. We are every- where." Before arrival of the package, the last communication from the SLA was received April 3. In Miss Hearst renounced her family and said she had become an SLA comrade. Previous communications lave included evidence purport- ed to show that the SLA had ddnaped Miss Hearst. But the Monday messages lacked any such evidence. They also lacked he usual SLA signoff, "Death to he Fascist insect that preys upon the life of the people." You'll find good honest a honest price with, .if i; Now! Furnace Cleaning Special! Reg. Value Only Hnve your Furnace chotked while still operating we'll jet and adjuit to peak efficiency We Do All This: Check Furnace, Check Clean Thermoitat Clean Furnace Oil Blower, Bearlngi and motor, Check all electrical and gat Check pilot lafefy. Check furnace flue. Check for leakt and cracki. Now you lave to on Central Air Conditioning by fam'oui AMANA Buy Now and Save No Money Down Call 364-4626 NOVAK Ail Makes Models Furnaces and Air Conditioners Heating Air Conditioning -.56- J6fh AvenueS.W. "Serving Cedar Kapldt tor 39 Its friends call it Wee' Jv.SHJsl and it's got a million of 'em. J. W. DANT KENTUCKY BOURBON 100 PROOF J. W. Danl Diillll.n Co., N.Y., N.Y,   

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