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Cedar Rapids Gazette Newspaper Archive: April 23, 1974 - Page 1

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Publication: Cedar Rapids Gazette

Location: Cedar Rapids, Iowa

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   Cedar Rapids Gazette (Newspaper) - April 23, 1974, Cedar Rapids, Iowa                                Weather- Clearing tonight with lows near 30. Mostly sunny Wednesday with highs in mid 60s. VOLUME 92 NUMBER 104 CITY FINAL 10 CENTS CEDAR RAPIDS, IOWA, TUESDAY, APRIL 23, 1974 ASSOCIATED PRESS, UPI, NEW YORK TIMES 26 Americans in 107 Crash Dead DENPASAR, Bali (UPI) A Indonesian army search uni hacked its way through moun tain jungles to the site of a Pa American World Airways jei liner crash just before dari Tuesday night and said ther were no survivors among th 107 persons aboard. Two Balinese villagers hai reached the scattered am smouldering wreckage earlier ir the evening, but the governmen held up official announcemen on the death toll until arrival o the paratroopers flown to the mountain from Jakarta. The paratroopers were report ed hacking a helipad out of tin jungle to help bring out thi bodies. Pan Am officials said 17 of the passengers were Amcri- Gannon Tabs Pal mer A Running Mate By Frank Nye DES MOINES In a most un- usual move Monday night, one of three Democratic candidates for governor endorsed one ol the party's two candidates foi lieutenant governor. Former State Rep. William Gannon norship candidate, the gover- callcd for election of a Gannon-Palmer team this fall at a fund-raiser for State Sen. William Palmer (D-Des Moines) in Ames. The other candidate for lieu- tenant governor, Stale Sen. Charles Miller wonders where that leaves him. "Now that Gannon has made this move this decision to have a Gannon-Palmer Miller told The Gazette, "it raises the question of total coop- eration if Gannon should be elected governor and I should be elected lieutenant governor this fall. "I have been scrupulously careful of having any ties with any of the other candidates dur- ing the primary race on the .theory I can cooperate with those who win the party's nom- inations this June." Gannon is the front runner, according to the polls, for the Democratic governorship nom- ination in his race with Democratic Senate Leader James ScSiabcn (D-Dunlap) and former Stale Rep. Clark Rasmussen (D-Wesl Des a past Democratic state chairman. Seldom, if ever, has a can- didate for governor on either party's ticket publicly endorsee a candidate for lieutenant gov ernor when more than one is seeking the nomination. can, 29 Japanese, 18 French, four German and three Cana- dian. The others were from India, Taiwan, Indonesia and the Philippines. Seven were of unknown origin. The crew included nine Amer- icans and two foreign-born stew- ardesses living in the United States. The jetliner was the fourth Pan Am Boeing 707 to crash the past 10 months. Three of the di- sasters were in the South Seas. There was no explanation for the South Pacific crashes the airports in most cases have modern facilities. The Denpasar control tower said (flight 812, which was to have landed also at Sydney, Fiji and Honolulu on the way :o Los Angeles, radioed "field in sight" in its last massage to :he ground. i Bali airport officials said they could detect nothing unusual be- iore radio contact with the ilane was lost. Police said the jetliner ap- parently struck Mt. Mesehe about 339 feet below the sum- mit. The plane would have had o pass between Mt. Mesehe and he nearby Mt. Tingatinga be- 'ore approaching the airport at Denpasar, Bali's main city. Mitchell-Stans Trial Stalled by Legal Argument NEW YORK: (UPI) Progress of the Mitchell-Stans criminal conspiracy trial was stalled Tuesday by legal ar- gument over admissibility of ev- dence about telephone calls and WircplMto Brandt Views Israeli Defenses West German Chancellor Willy Brandt, center, tours the former Israeli Bar Lev defense line on the east bank of the Suez Canal. With him are Gen. Saad Maamoun, foreground, assistant Israeli war minister, and Gen. Ahmed Badawi, Third army commander. In the background is a military bridge built during the October war. 4 Told Kidnap VA'S Johnson To Resign Story; Hoax Investigation MIAMI (AP) Bank officia Albert L. Dantzler, who las meetings of the defendants. After nearly two hours of Will Pay for Scaring Birds FREDERICK, Md. (UPI) County commissioners agreec Monday to pay a bill the cost of scaring off millions of birds from their roosting place near the tiny village ol Graceham. The funds were to finance a five-night noise attack that had featured firecrackers and elec- tronic sound equipment. The birds had frightened livestock, destroyed grain created potential fields health and ards with their droppings, which were inches deep in spots. After the birds finally left, commissioners were upset that the state health department ran up the bill without their prior authorization. But they agreed Monday that the restora- tion of serenity in Graceham was worth the cost. Today's Chuckle Hurnor is the hole that lets (he sawdust out of a stuffed shirt. Coovrinhl over listings made by the government from the logs of the wo defendants and argument n his chambers, Federal Judg jee Gagliardi called in the jury explained the .situation, and sen t out for an early lunch. He previously indicated tha be case of former Attorne; General John Mitchell am ormer Commerce Seeretar ilaurice Stans would go to the ury late Wednesday, but thi hange in schedule raised thi ossibility that the jury woulc egin deliberations Thursday. The argument arose out of a overnment attempt to enter nto evidence a listing of sched- led phone calls and meetings uring several months of 1972 nd 1973. The defense argued that the mere scheduling was no 1 for ransom, is being in in a possible extor ion hoax, a source close to the cidnap inquiry said Tuesday. "Dantzler is the subject of criminal the WASHINGTON (AP) Don- ald E. Johnson, a native of West Branch, sharply criticized on both sides of Capitol Hill and by several veterans organizations, Veterans Administration. But White House spokesman Gerald Warren Tuesday rejected reports that Johnson had been Donald E. Johnson Hep. Olin .Teague of Texas, ranking Democrat on the house veterans affairs commit- tee; the Veterans Wars; the Disabled American Veterans, and the Paralyzed Veterans of America. Ray Soden, national ci mander-in-chief of the Veterans of Foreign Wars, expressec pleasure at Johnson's departure Israel's Rabin Faces Tough Political Job TEL AVIV (AP) Yitzhak Rabin, chosen io succeed Golda Meir as Israel's premier, Tues- day faced long, hard bargaining with prospective coalition partners in an attempt to form a new government. The ruling Labor party's cen- tral committee elected Rabin premier-designate Monday by a vote of 298 to 254 over Informa- tion Minister Shimon Peres. Ra- bin's name was to be submitted Tuesday to President Ephraim Katzir. Tough Job He has three weeks to put President Given Five together a coalition with a ma- j Warren, jority in the knesset, Israel's parliament, and could get three-week extension if neces- sary. But both of Labor's partners in previous govern- ments the National Religious party and the Liberals have made clear that Rabin will have a tough job getting them to join his team. Many Liberals want a new WASHINGTON (AP) The While House said Tuesday Pres- ident Nixon has requested and been granted five extra days to respond to a house judiciary committee subpoena for 42 tape-recorded presidential con- versations. Nixon made the request be- cause "he wants to take some additional time to review the response in its said Deputy Press Secretary Gerald election rather than just new faces in the cabinet. And lead- ers of the Religious party are under fire from their militant youth division for not extracting enough religious from Labor when Mrs. Meir's last March 6. Meanwhile, Israeli war- planes streaked across the rocky Golan Heightsi Tuesday, strafing Syrian positions on strategic Mt. Hermon. On the. ground, Israeli and Syrian howitzersi dueled along the tense cease-fire lines. The Tel Aviv command re- proof the calls ever took place. and meetings Moving from Cardboard Box To Garage Room TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (UPI) Retired baker Harvey Smith whose a month Social Se- curity check forced him to live in a discarded cardboard box has been given a garage room by a couple. Mr. and Mrs. Ted Kiper said they are fixing up an area over their garage for Smith, 67, and [hey plan to install a small bathroom. The Kipcrs said Smith, who doesn't want will do yardwork and other chores to lay for his rent. Smith sleeping in a discarded appliance box in a 'acant lot and cooking his meals on a portable camping stove because he couldn't make ends meet on his retirement check. Confirms Quello For FCC Post WASHINGTON (AP) The senate Tuesday confirmed re- ircd Detroit broadcaster James Quello for a seven-year term on .he Federal Commission. Communications source told the well-placed source snarls and VA saying "We are hopeful had planned for this decision will spark a .An assistant vice-president ol City National Bank of Hallan-dale, Dantzler called the a year to return to private life when his term expires June national commander of the American Legion in 1964, the direction in the VA." Johnson's resignation "shoulc assist the veterans of this Friday and said he was Johnson left a and will hopefully im- held for ransom. He was found unharmed early Saturday on a Fort Lauderdale beach and .later told police announced his resignation plans on Monday after President Nixon's chief of staff Alexander Haig met with farm supply business in Iowa to head the agency. Calls for the resignation have come from Sen. Cranston the services across the Soden said. (The American Legion, which Page 3, Col. 3.) had escaped by jumping from a boat into the ocean and swimming to veterans affairs committee leaders and later with Strike, U. His car was discovered by police nine blocks from the part of the beach where he statement said he lad informed Haig "of my to resign as Sessions found. A police officer said NATIONS (AP) of the day's plenary meet- deposits on the car revealed that it had not been there said he had of U.N. interpreters stayed off the job Tuesday in Tuesday to have seen the more than a couple of hours. Police originally said a package containing five years "of dedicated service" to the veterans and considered that his administration achieved a great over long hours. The action forced cancellation of General Assembly plenary of speeches by foreign ministers and other heads of delegations on problems caused placed in a trash receptacle not fsr from critics frequently The corps of 75 the energy crisis and price increases. administration was as the sufficient number of in- But the source told AP that a dummy package, containing a note to the alleged it one of "frustrating nefficiency and bureaucratic that delegates tune in on in English, French, Russian, Spanish and Chinese. was reported on hand so a special full-membership committee of the Assembly was was used also have been have complained to schedule ite regular "The note said their the VA under Johnson and understaffing The committee has 'or the money within a a "dumping special Assembly writing a declaration of lour was unreasonable. It former Nixon way since April 9 on on raw materials and suggested that, if they contacted us again, we would make and development. There was no immediate The social committee of the effort to accommodate March, Nixon from the U.N. and Social Council, :he source to head a on the dispute, except of the main U.N. organs, No further contact was to study complaints announcement of canceled its meetings. Court Skirts Racial Quota Issue WASHINGTON (AP) The supreme court Tuesday de- clined, at least for the present :erm, to rule on the constitu- ionalily of giving preferred realment to racial minorities in compensation for past discrimi- nation. The ruling in a case involving preference for minority stu- dents at the University of Wash- ngton law school had been ea- ;erly awaited for its potential mpact on the future course of affirmative action programs to redress past discrimination. Moot Case But the court said Tuesday in an unsigned opinion that the case is moot. The case involves a white stu- dent, Marco DeFunis, who was nitially denied admission to the aw school while a number of ninority students gained admis- sion although not scoring as well on admissions tests and the like. DeFunis, who was admitted to the law school under judicial order, is about lo graduate. "Because the petitioner will complete his law school studies at the end of the term for which he is now registered regardless of any decision this court might reach on the merits of this liti- gation, we conclude that the court cannot consider the substantive constitutional issues tendered by the said the unsigned court opinion. Justices Brcnnan, Marshall, White and Douglas dissented. Available Later The unsigned majority opinion indicated the issue will be avail- able for court decision at a later date. "If the admissions procedures of the law school remain un- changed, there is no reason to suppose that a subsequent case attacking those procedures will not come with relative speed to this court now that the supreme court of Washington has spo- the majority said. The state supreme court had approved the admissions poli- cies of the law school. State authorities have told the court that DeFunis will be permitted to complete his legal education and receive his degree regard- less of the outcome of the case. The Constitution requires that federal courts act only in an ex- isting case or controversy. The high court has determined in previous cases that "federal courts are without power lo dc-: cidc questions that cannot affect the rights of the litigants before them." The majority cited these factors in declining to decide the DeFunis case on the merits. In two other opinions Tues- day, the court: Ruled 5 to 4 that "all forms of managerial employes" are ex- cluded from union membership. Ruled unanimously in a Col- orado case that a state may not place a ceiling on work expense deductions for recipients of aid to families with dependent chil- dren. Gas Pinpointed As Blast Cause NEW YORK (AP) Fire Commissioner John T. O'Hagan said Tuesday that a free-flowing gas leak caused the explosion that ripped open two skyscrapers Monday and injured almost 100 persons. rorted two more Israelis killed in the fighting on the front lines Monday. The Tel Aviv command said the air attacks were aimed at stopping-construction of a road that would take Syrian armor and artillery up the snow- capped ridges of the mountain. The command said all Israeli planes "returned safely to base" following the two-hour at- tack. The Syrian command said its air defenses stopped the attack before the Israelis reached their targets. Syrian Gunners A spokesman for the Tel Avi command said Syrian gunners fired on the southern sector o Ihe Golan Heights shortly after the warplanes made their fina pass Tuesday. He said israeli gunners re turned fire in the 43rd succes ;ive day of artillery exchanges on the northern front. The selection of Rabin was seen as a victory for the dov- ish left wing of the Labor party, which advocates greater territorial compro- mise with the Arabs than Mrs. Meir had been willing to offer. "We must exhaust every pos- sibility of he declared n his acceptance speech. But Rabin's reported Warren said Nixon's re- quest was relayed to the com- mittee's chief counsel, John Doar, by White House Water- gate lawyer James St. Ciair, and that Chairman Rodino (D- N.J.) and the committee staff agreed to extend the deadline until next Tuesday. Rodino scheduled the news conference for Tuesday after- Other whether members questioned Rodino had the au- ingness to return to Jordan part of the West Bank territory cap- tured in 1967 alarms the Reli- gious party, which considers the territory part of biblical Israel. First Sabra Rabin at 52 is the first sabra, or native-born Israeli, to be picked for the premiership, the youngest man ever chosen and the representative of a genera- tion new to the top power circle in Israel. A newcomer to politics, he joined the cabinet for the first time six weeks ago as labor minister. Although he was chief of staff during the 1967 war, he was not called back to active duty during the war last Oc- tober. This has enabled him (o slay clear of the controversy over the government's unprc- parcdness for the Arab attack, a dispute which hurt the Labor parly in the December election and finally forced Mrs. Meir lo quit. Until last fall, Rabin for five years was Israel's ambassador: (Continued: Page 3, Col. 5.) thority to grant a delay on his concessions own. However, it appeared thes" joined there would be majority support government an extension if Rodino puts it to a committee vote. The subpoena, issued after a 33-3 vote of the panel conduct- ing an historic impeachment in- quiry, carried an original dead- line of this Thursday. Additional Tapes In. recent days, the committee has told the White House it has additional requests for tapes of presidential conversations. War- ren said in response to a ques- tion that the additional request had no effect on Nixon's deci- ;ion to seek the extension in answering the subpoena. When asked whether the new house request was for docu- ments and tapes related to the :TT anti-trust and a controver- sial milk price support decision, Warren responded ffiat it was 'more broad in scope than that." But Warren would not enu- merate what was being sought beyond the 42 subpoenaed tape recordings. Time Consuming In disclosing the extension re- quest, Warren said, "The Pres- ident has spent many hours re- viewing the response and has decided he would like some extra time to'review it in its entirety." Warren's statement indicated what other officials had report- ed earlier that Nixon has ten- tatively decided to give. the committee edited transcripts of the conversations rather than the tape recordings themselves. One official said that White House representatives told the committee staff that it was a 'very time consuming job to compile and prepare material" for the answer. This was an apparent refer- ence to the transcription of the tape recordings, which one source said was made more dif- "icult because portions of the conversations are virtually in- audible. "The President wants to deal vith this matter in a coopera- ive and reasonable way. He does not seek a he official said. However, a ranking White (Continued: Page 3, Col. 7.) will- Today's Index Comics .....................19 Crossword ..................19 Daily Record................3 Deaths ......................3 Editorial cFaturcs ..........6 Farm Financial..................20 Marion .....................20 Movies.....................18 Society .....................10 Sports ...................15-17 State Television ..................11 Want Ads ................22-25   

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