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Cedar Rapids Gazette Newspaper Archive: April 13, 1974 - Page 7

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Publication: Cedar Rapids Gazette

Location: Cedar Rapids, Iowa

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   Cedar Rapids Gazette (Newspaper) - April 13, 1974, Cedar Rapids, Iowa                                Financial and Market News C.R. Markets Prices paid on the Cedar Rap- ids hog market Saturday were lower. Prices paid Thursday for the bulk of country and plant de- livered butchers weighing 200 to 230 lb., depending on grade and condition were Packing sows 300 Ibs. down were Butchers 230-240 Ibs. are 25t off; 240-250 Ibs. arc 50e off; and 75c off for each 10 Ibs. weigh over 250. Packers are 25c off for each weight grade from 300-360 Ibs., 50c off each weight grade to 500 Ibs. and 7oc off each weight grade above 500 Ibs. GRAIN No. 2 yellow corn. Thursday prices delivered. CATTLE MARKET Choice and prime steers Choice and prime heifers '_ r-SSd f S3! !Hi Soys Phosphate Deal with Soviet Will Boost Prices Bds (Yield 'lir'ade 4 'ma I it' a' ers are discounted FEEDER CATTLE vs quolallons (mm April May Close Prev ...............no trades 465C J7.SO 47.4J IOWA FARM EGGS ket News Service reporter? 'prices "un changed. Undertone unsettled, "ale week movement to retail outlets increased in some Quarters but generally complete" tor holiday requirements. Supply ample Cents per dozen at farms, cafes 5- ,qualrly Incenlf dirties and checks UC-28C, mosflv 50c-53c- small and oeewees mostly 20c-23c' POULTRY Iowa live hens, light type undertone barely steady to mostly weak. Offerings iignt. off-farm movement relatively heavy but current sales too few lo report fil larnls: Commercial SHEEP ihPDlio shorn lambs under Iowa Hogs DES MO1NES (AP) (USDA) receipts Friday at Iowa and southern Minnesota packing plants, important con- centration yards and buying stations week ago year ago Butchers fully 50 higher, movement slow, de- mand good; sows steady. A large share of interest out of the market because of Good Friday. Country points: U.S. 1-3 200- 230 lb 30.75-31.00; 230-'50 lb 30.00-30.75; 250-270 lb 29 00- 30.00; sows U.S. 1-3 270-330 lb 26.25-27.00; 330-400 lb 2575- 26.50. Packing plants: U.S 1-3 200-230 lb 230-250 lb 30.50-31.25; 250-270 lb 29.50- 30.50; sows U.S. 1-3 270-330 lb 2B.50-27.50; 330-400 lb 2525- 27.00. DRESSED MEATS DES MOINES (AP) (USDA) Mid. west carlot meat trade lor Iowa and river market areas: Beef trade slow, demand remains good OH. classes, choice sleer beef 1.50 higher than Wednesday's sales, choice heifer beef steady; steer beet choice 600- bKl Ctl0ice pork cut trade only fairly active, limited trade picnics strong, skinned hams steady 1o 1.00 higher, bellies steady to I.DO higher; loins frozen, two toads 14-17 lb. 69.00; picnics 8 Ibs. and up 38 00; skinned hams 14-17 lb. 54.50, 17-20 lb. 52.50-53.50. 20-2fi lb 46 50-47 CO, 26 Ibs and up 45.50.45.75; bellies 12-14 lb. ib. 43.00-43.50, 18-20 lb 41.50 TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (AP) Taxpayers financing an- other trade agreement with the Soviet Union which will raise food prices in the U.S., accord- ing to Florida's secretary of state, Richard Stone. "The people who brought you the great grain robbery now are bringing you the phosphate Stone said Friday. He said the agreement calls for shipping 20 million tons of phosphate to the Soviet Union Sunrise Services JAre Planned by Marion Churches! Marion Churches Stone said the fertilizer ex- change had been approved by Secretary of Commerce Dent. "It is amazing that the U.S. would extend loans to an adver- sary like Russia at 6 percent in-jing sunrise services for Easter [Credibility of Chris terest when the prime rate in Sunday. New York is 10 he Bethel Baptist's service is af ih, The Cedar Rapids Gazette: Sat., April 13, 1974 U.S. Acts To Blunt Disaster By Earthquakes of Future Barrett the National Oceanic and Atmo-j zones and to relate this to earth- Calvin WASHINGTON CWD A spheric Administration and occurence. fact sheet nhmit pflrthmmL-ftc raJN'attnnal fonlor fnr i and buying, at market prices, 20 million tons of nitrates over 20 years. Stone, a candidate for tin Democratic senate nomination said the U.S. Export-Impor bank in Washington was making a 5180-milIion low-interest loai to the Soviet Union, apparently to pay Occidental Petroleum Co 'or the phosphate. 70-MiUion Claim An Occidental spokesman de lied any taxpayer funds woulc )e involved and claimed the deal involved buying 70 million ons of nitrates rather than the 20 million claimed by Stone. Asked Refund of 97 Cenfs, But Got Much More GRINNELL (AP) When Bruce Sears, 18, Grinnell, wrote a Chicago firm for a 97- cent refund he received more than he expected more. Sears said he had mis- calculated the postage on an order to a photographic sup- ply firm. After realizing his error, he wrote the company for a refund. A few days later, "I found they had sent me a check for said Sears, a Grinnell high school senior. However, he said the check could not be cashed because it had "not valid for more than 55" printed at the bottom. Sears said he probably would not have cashed it anyway "because that would not have been honest." Sears had planned to keep the check as a souvenir, but now plans to return it to the company "because their book- keeping must be awfully fouled up." JOLIET LIVESTOCK JOLIET, III. (UPI) Cattle leers steady to 25 hloher under savier 50-1.00 higher; heifers mostly higher; choice steer beef 42.00-44.50; igh choice and prime 40.00-44.00; choice eifers 42.00-43.50; hiah choice and prime 3.00; no canner or cutter cows. Hogs 000; steady to 50 higher; No 1-3 00-230 Ib 33.00-33.50; No 1-2 200-230 Ib J .00-33.00; No 1-3 220-250 Ib 31.00-38.00. Monday estimated receipts: cat- tle. twos. said. The agreement calls for I million in financing, including million from private sources and million from the Sovie; Union. Part of the money is to be used for Soviet plants and fa- cilities to convert the phosphate into fertilizer. "Perfect Record" Stone said he had asked Ar- m a n d Hammer, Occidental board chairman, what assur- ance the U.S. had that the money would be repaid, but had not received a reply. "The Russians have a perfect record they have never re- paid any Stone said. "The Export-Import bank is supposed to be for responsible developing nations and Russia is neither a developing nation nor a responsible debtor." The agriculture department said Russia has made install- ment payments "right on time" since getting a pack- age of credit to buy U.S. grain in July, 1972. That loan was under a dif- ferent program, was made at regular commercial interest rates and was for three years. Regents Adopt Grievance Policy AMES state board of regents has adopted a policy clarifying the procedure used by regents' employes with work- related grievances. Regents rules provide that at each step of the grievance pro- cedure, an employe may be represented by one or two per- sons of his own choosing. The rules also provide tha the employe and his representa live may take time off frorr work to investigate the griev ance without loss of pay. The board adopted a polic; rriday stating that time off wil )e granted only after a prelim nary meeting between the em )loye and his supervisor. Les Chisholm, business agen or the American Federation o State, County and Municipa mployes, protested the action "Removing the right to in a grievance before i s presented will make it prac ically impossible to resolve thi grievance at the first Chisholm said. Father' Sunday school 9-30 ifact shcct about earthquakes Center for Earthquake! Laboratory and field cxperi- Manon churches are sponsor- Worship Sermon: -The cently released by the interior'Research operated by interior's' ments to determine feasibility sa-vs lncre is a 70 geological survey. ;of controlling maximum size of .....ZTy a Sreat earth-; Stronger Structure 'earthquakes along a fault. quake in ihe densely populaied Most of the projects are being 2R9S Four- areas of the Pacific coast within; inls consolidation provides chiefly on the San An- next 30 years. national program with stronger I dreas and related faults in the ___________ i But the Pacific coast area is organizational and research j densely populated Los Angeles Pinicon Ridge park at Central j Grace Baptist 440 South I not the only part of (he country slructure for the reduction of! and central California areas City is the site of the Robins stieet- Tne Rev- Don! susceptible" to such a castronhe iearthquake hazards. It also will Faith Bible church sunrise The department did not provide ;Provide to nongovern- Other Studies with the Rev. Calvin! First Baptist Thorpe's sermon topic, lory's Greatest vice at The Luther league of Ascen- sion Lutheran will conduct sunrise services at "Let's Celebrate Life" is the topic of the Rev. John D. Hubcr, jr., at the St. Paul's Lutheran service at 6. First United Methodist has set its service for 6 with "Sunrise Service" as the topic. Breakin Is Reported At Fisher Residence Marion police reported a Dreakin Friday before p.m. at the Doyle E. Fisher lome. 1199 Twenty-fourth street. The family was gone at the time of the burglary. Police said a quantity of household items, jewelry, in change and a shotgun were stolen. A loss complete list of the theft still was being compiled Saturday morning. Police were continuing to in- vestigate the breakin Saturday and did not reveal how entry was gained to the house. Marion Barber Service closed April 22nd thru 29th. Vacation.- Adv. Big Boy is cooking yp a special value fou and your family on Easter Sunday! i Big Country Style Chicken Dinner Three whoppin big pieces of chicken served up with whip- ped potatoes and our country gravy, crisp salad and a fresh roil and butter. Sun. Apr. 14 Only PECIAL CARRYOUT VALUES! BUCKET 15 Big pieces. Serve 5-7 for less than 704 each. BARREL 21 Delicious pieces. Serve 7-10 for less 65ceach. Big Bo FAMILY RESTAURANTS 4801 FIRST AVE. SE 377-7391 DES MOINES from the state's liquor sales in- creased million in the last fiscal year as sales on both wine and distilled spirits rose, the Iowa beer and liquor control department said Friday. Wine sales increased sharply during the 1973 fiscal year, the department said, up 29 percent from fiscal 1972. That was dou- national rate of in- Squaw Creek Baptist Wil- kins school. The pev. Kermit W. Jelmcland. Worship 9. Sun- day school 10. Robins Faith Bible Corner Main and Mentzer. The Rev. Ed Batoman. Worship and 7. Sunday school St. Joseph's Catholic 995 Filth avenue. The Rev. Justin A. Kane, the Rev. Martin W. Plab and the Rev. will celebrate mass Saturday at 7 p.m. at the school, 1430 Fourteenth street, and Sunday at 7, and 11 a.m. at the church and 10 and at the school. Marion Christian 1050 Mc- Gowan boulevard. The Rev. Peter M. Morgan. Sunday school Worship Sermon: "The Cross and Robins Church of the Brethren 355 Second street The Rev. Harold Justice. Sun- day school 10. Worship 11 and 7. Church of Christ any percentage estimate nor did mcn' scientists for participation But oilier studies are being it define the other likely carthquake-related research. conducted in south-central Alas- but it did note the area's where: Already more than 150 western Washington; Neva- sever earthquakes have and engineers are parlici-Ma: 'he eastern border of the paling in several programs and range province in curred in the past. It said the increased popula-'derway, which include: 1 Utah and Wyoming; and in tion in major urban centers is: Geologic and geophysical and South Carolina, causing residential to delineale areas Although interior estimated to spread into areas risk including ground mo-'tnc chances of a great earth- more susceptible to severe jt'on effects, fault displacement, j quake would be greatest on the earthquake damage. i earthquake-induced landslides 'West Coast, it pointed out se- and liquefaction. jverc quakes have occurred at Studies to develop the Madrid, Mo.; Boston; For this reason, it said, therejity for forecasting lime, S. C. and in Utah, was a need for action against! and magnitude of earthquakes, i Nevada and Montana. It said earthquake hazards _ and Hi Field mapping and pho-lthey could occur again in these listed some being taken by studies to recognize nr Action Needed 1087 ble the crease. Sales of distilled spirits, such as gin, rum and whisky, rose less than 8 percent during the period, while profits increased :rom million to 523.7 mil- ion. Officials attributed part of the increase in profits to lowering the drinking age. "Although it is impossible to measure the exact impact these new consumers (those under 21) had on liquor the report said, "there is no doubt they vere a major contributor to the ecord increases of 1973." The report said the biggest, ncrease in wine sales involved he so-called pop wines, which usually sell for about a bot- le. Sales of those wines in- reased 277 percent in fiscal 973, reaching more than 00 gallons. The report also said Iowa's er capita consumption is the ourth lowest in the nation al- hough liquor sales in the state ave increased for ten straight ears. Eighteenth street. William Cain. Bible school 10. Worship 11 and Ascension Lutheran 2210 Grand avenue. The Rev. Denny J. Brake. Worship 10. Sermon: Lutheran Church of the Res- urrection 2770 Eighteenth avenue. The Rev. Otto A. Zwanzigcr. Worship 8 and Sunday school St. Paul's Lutheran (Missouri Synod) _ 915 Twenty-seventh street. The Rev. John D. Huber, jr. Worship 8 and Ser- mon: "Where Shall We Look for Sunday school First United Methodist 1277 Eighth avenue. The Rev. Glen W. Lamb and the Rev. J. M. Steffenson. Worship 8 and 11. Sermon: "The Easter Win- Worship Sermon: "We Have This Sunday school Prairie Chapel "United Meth- odist Route 3. The Rev. Clive Cook. Sunday school Worship First Presbyterian 802 Twelfth street. The Rev. Jay A. Miller. Sunday school Worship 8 and Sermon: "The Cross and the Resurrec- Reformed 965 South Presbyterian Fifteenth street. The Rev. John M. McMillan. Sunday school 10. Worship 11. Evening study group. Church of God (Seventh Day) 600 Ninth avenue. W. J. Kuryluk, pastor. Song ser- vice Sabbath school 10, worship 11, Saturday. Friday, Bible study 8. United Seventh Daj Brethren 2400 Second ave- nue. W. Allen Bond, pastor. Worship 10, church school Saturday. 11 Federal government. j active faults, and to determine Chief among these is an earth-jthe recurrence intervals of fault quake warning system, im- proved building design stan- dards, and effective land use and emergency planning. Interi- or estimated that potential losses from a great earthquake could be reduced by more than half within 30 years by such methods. Also, the government recently consolidated the earthquake re- movement. Studies of ground motions and or other areas. One did occur just recently. There was a mild tremor cen- tered in the vicinity of Olney, However, no injuries were their influence on local site cf-'rcPur'ed and 'here apparently fects, including analysis ofiwas only very minor damage earth motions in building, bridges, and other engineered! structures. Rock, deformation, experi- ments and computer simultationl of fault zone movements and be-i Cease-Fire tator on the Syrian state, trolled television. "We now consi at war with Isr; Friday night. Heights for more month is a clear p 'act." The commentator ritories." BOISE, Idaho Almost 12, billion damages are sought n a suit filed by the families of i men killed in the Sunshine line disaster. The underground fire in the ellogg, Idaho, mine May 2 972 killed 91 miners. Agnes .House filed the suit for erself and 220 others in U.S. district court, charging 21 com- panies and the federal govern- ment with complicity in the deaths. The suit claims the defendants provided false or inaccurate in- formation about the hazards of products used in the mine and were willfully negligent by pro- viding or installing inadequate equipment and materials for use in it. Each of the families of the 56 miners claims million in gen- eral damages from each defend- ant and million punitive damages from all but three of the defendants, for a total of billion. In addition, Ihe survivors seek medical, funeral and legal expenses. Salary Proposal Review Asked AMES (AP) The state loard of regents has approved a proposal asking Gov. Robert lay to request a review of rec- immended salaries for state de- lartmenl heads. Board President Mrs. H. Rand Pctcrsen, Harlan, said the salary recommended by Hay and Associates, Chicago, for re- gents' Executive Secretary R. Wayne Richey was too low. The Hay report was commis- sioned in early 1973 to recom- mend salaries for legislative and judicial employes. Gov. Robert Ray also asked for rec- ommendations for all state de- partment heads. The report was the basis for Ray's salary recommendations to the Iowa legislature. Members of the board agreed with Mrs. Petersen that Ri- :hey's salary was too war. But he said ties" were paying attention only rried out deep structure of faull Monday for D. Randall D. Randall, 75, 1 i lifelong resident of Solon and Syria died unexpectedly at st home Thursday. Born in Solon Oct. 30, 1898, he fire still Mina Minor Jan. 24, a in Solon. He farmed in the state- vicinity until his retire- in 1959. r in addition to his he are two daughters, Mrs. Joe Zbanek, Ely, and Mrs. Mer- Davis, Solon; four grand- t has five great- n the three sisters, than Ruark, Ogden, Utah; roof of Frank Hensen, Minong, and Mrs. Ena Jones, Clin- r and two brothers, Alfred ating Carl, Solon. m of Brosh funeral home possible Monday at 11 a.m. by the d Arab A. T. Washington. Burial: cemetery, Solon. d may call at the funeral fter Sunday. from srael Substance ce the Against Two county sheriff's deputies cretary two men Friday night o possession of a controlled 'other Authorities declined Common Cause Counsel Cites Three Crises IOWA CITY Ken Guido, Washington, D.C., head of the legal division of Common Cause, the national citizens' lobby, Friday claimed the na- tion faces three crises arising from abuses of power in the Wa- tergate breakin and the cover- up of what actually happened. Speaking at the college of law at the University of Iowa, Guido identified crises in the political process, in law enforcement and the judicial process, and in the legal profession itself. Citing the strong bill for pub- lic financing of political cam- paigns passed this week in the senate, Guido noted "only by removing the dependence of candidates on private funds are you going to prevent future Wa- :ergates." Guido cited the naivete of fed- eral law enforcement officers in facing the Watergate crimes. For example, he said Henry Pe- tersen in the department of jus- tice could not believe the Water- gate breakin was.any more than a burglary by underlings in the Nixon administration. Yet, in- vestigations revealed the Water- gate schemes were discussed by Nixon's closest political ad- visors, and that the former head of the FBI destroyed evidence. I' Two hundred people attended to "superficial details" rather Held in Linn county jail are the noon-hour forum, and the than going into the basic issue Richard John Maske, 18, of 349 of withdrawal. Want ads perform an impor- tant community service, read them daily! Return Bodies of 17 from Vietnam OAKLAND, Calif. enteen dead Americans, their coffins draped in red, white and blue, are home at last from the Vietnam war. There was no ceremony Fri day as an air force cargo plane bearing the last American ser- vicemen said to have died North Vietnamese prison camps landed at Travis air force base. Final identification of the bodies was being made at the Oakland army terminal mortu- ary. No names were released, j They had been classified asj Sign Language Classes Are Set Classes for hearing persons who would, like to learn the American sign language are set to begin May 7 at St. Paul's Lutheran church, 915 Twenty- seventh street, Marion. I The classes will meet Tuesday nights from May 7 through June 25. An intermediate class will meet at 7 p.m., and a beginner's class at 8 p.m. The course is free, but text- books may be purchased. For I more information, telephone the! Rev. Allan Page at 362-6528. I Ninth avenue, Marion, and Scott Moulds, 19, of 1050 Eighth street, Marion. audience included law students and faculty, several state repre- sentatives, and many area members of Common Cause. missing in action their] deaths were confirmed by North Vietnamese at the signing j of the cease-fire Jan. 27, 1973. For the Finest" in Paints Phone 364-0213 for F-A-S-T APPLIANCE SERVICE We Service AH Hakes I o LpjcrLnJr Open Saturday 'Til Noon APPLIANCE, 620 2nd Avc. SE" Phone 364-0213 Coupons Must Be Presented With Incoming Orders Expires Apr. 19 Sweaters Trousers No Limit rimS Pleats Extra Expires Apr. 19 2 Piece Suits 2 Piece Dresses O'Coats Furs, Suedes, Leathers Pleats, Formats Extra. No Limit o Expert Alterations, Mending Re-weaving 2 LOCATIONS 3rd SI. SE HOURS: Open 7 a.m.-6 p.m. Daily Marion 708 7th Avo. HOURS: Mon. thru Fri. 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. Sat. 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. 1 Hour Service Daily Including Sat., 'til 3 p.m.   

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