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Cedar Rapids Gazette Newspaper Archive: April 6, 1974 - Page 8

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   Cedar Rapids Gazette (Newspaper) - April 6, 1974, Cedar Rapids, Iowa                                The uetlar Uapms Uazeiie: sat., April 6, 1974 Financial and Market News Dow Closes 1 1 .35 Lower NEW YORK (AP) Rising interest rates sent another jolt through the stock market P'ri- day, pushing prices sharply low- er. Trading was extremely light, however, apparently indicating that the market was suffering more from an absence of buy- ing support than any heavy- selling pressure. The Dow Jones average of 30 industrials closed off 11.35 at 847.54. C.R. Markets Prices paid on the Cedar Rap- ids hog market Saturday were steady. Prices paid Friday for the bulk of country and plant de- livered butchers weighing 200 to 230 lb., depending on grade and condition were .00. Packing sows 300 Ibs. down were Butchers 230-240 Ibs. are 25c off; 240-250 Ibs. are 50c off; and 7oc off for each 10 Ibs. weight over 250. Packers are 25c off for each weight grade from 300-360 Ibs., 50c off each weight grade to 500 Ibs. and 75c off each weight grade above 500 Ibs. GRAIN No. 2 yellow corn. 52.22. No 1 velow soybeans, S5.00. 33 lb. oats. Friday prices delivered. FEEDER CATTLE Friday's quotations frcm Lamson Bros Prev. 4i.ll WHEAT- May July September December May July.......... September December A'.ay July September V.ay July August Seotember November CHICAGO GRAIN QUOTATIONS Furnished by Lamson Brothers OPEN HIGH LOW OPEN HIGH LOW .....i.10 -AH J1J 4.C3 l.K -3.V3 J02 335 -3.93 -3.79 ..2.47 -2.51 2.50 2.43 -2.49 2.37 -2.33 1.15'i-US -5.W 5.50 -5.54 5.44 .5.43 5.31 5.26 -5.2' 1.05 2.54'i 2.S1 2.41 1.14'z 1.15-; 1.19 5.61 5.5.1 5.50 5.39 5.33'; 3.94 2.49 2.4? 2.45 2.35 5.43'j 5.41'j 5.36 5.26' i 5.17 CLOSE CLOSE 423 3.76 I.5J 401 2.52 2.49 2.39' 2 1.12 l.U'3 1.17' i 5.36 5.26': 5.18 j John McMillan Is i New Church Paslor! PREV. CL. PRtV. CL. J-s j Reformed Presbyterian i i church, 965 South Fifteenth! Marion Churches Witness: Was Told Boyle Unaware of Murder Plot 4.07 2.53 2.59 2.52 2.42 1.17 1.21 5.63V: 5.61'i 5.56 5-17 5.37 j family arrived in Marion Thurs- day. He will assume his pas- Bethel Baptist 1000 Eigh ____.......avenue. The Rev. Calv j street, has a new minister The! '''horpc. Sunday school 'Rev. John McMillan and his worship Sermon: "Th Son of God on Earth: A Stuc torate Sunday in Divinc Relationships' First Baptist 2895 Four ine Rev. Mr. McMillan avenue. The Rev. Ly pastor of (he Coldenham Re- Sund  4 Miracle 3'a Quaker Oals 25' Rath n Rockwell United Fire Victor Corp. Winnebago Casualty 19'i-20U 15 CHICAGO CASH GRAIN CHICAGO (AP) Wheat No. 2 sol No. 1 hard l.min. Corn No. 2 yellow 2.54n. pals No. 2 extra heavy white Soybeans No. 1 yellow S.59n. FROZEN PORK BELLIES Friday's quotations from Lamson Bros steady. Cents per pound af farms: Commercial !Sct! -6i'c' mostly small fai flocks 3-5c, mostly 3-dc. IOWA FARM EGGS t MO'NES-TlK Federal-State Mar- ket News Service reported prices mostly unchanged. Graded demand generally im- proved on large. Supplies adequate. Deal- er inventory up on medium. Movement sluggish. Undertone about steady on large; unsettled on medium Cents per dozen at farms, cases ex- changed, ouality and volume incentive Grade A large or Defter mostly 3H7C A' mostly Other farm eggs: Grade A. large or better 32-iOc, mostly Grade A. medium 22-Mc, mostly 2S-28c; Grade B, large 20-30C, mostly 23-28c; C quality dirties and checks 16-30c, moslly 20-23C- small and peewees 16-25C, moslly 2Q-23c. CATTLE MARKET Choice and prime steers .....S3a.00-5do 00 Choice and prime heifers S37 00-S40 00 Good steers ..................s3S.oo-s3Bloo Good heifers ..........S35.00-S37.00 Standard and utility Standard and utility heifers...S3J.oo-s36.oo Utility cows Commercial cows S57 00-' Cutter cows ..................S2J.00-S3J.Ofi Bulls S32.00-S35.00 (Yield grade 4 overfat steers and heif- ers are discounted S5 per cwt. and yield grade 5 are discounted per (Wasty and gobby overfat steers are S3 and 55 less per 100 Ihs. than regular com- mercial cows.) Iowa Hojrs DES MOINES CAP) (USDA) receipts Friday at Iowa and southern Minnesota packing plants, important con- centration yards and buying stations week ago 000; year ago Butchers 1.00-1.50 lower; movement slow, demand fair; sows mostly 50-75 lower. Country points: U.S. 1-3 200- 230 lb 30.00-30.50; 230-250 lb May July August February Close ......48.22 ......49.20 .....48.35 52.80 Prev. POSTVILLE BEEF POSTVILLEi-The Postville b beef market Friday quoted prices of prime steers, S40.00-S41.00; choice steers, S40.00-S4] 00; good steers, S37.50-S3a.50; standard steers, S34.00-S35.00; choice heifers, S39.00-S40.00; good heifers, S37.00-S38.00; utility cows, S25.00-S32.00; canners and commercial "OWs, S25 00-S32.00; bulls 536.00-S3B.OO. JOLIET LIVESTOCK YESTERDAY'S QUOTATIONS .JOLIET, III. (JPI) _ Livestock: Cat- tle steers opening l.CO to 1.50 low- er; heifers 50 to openin 75 cent ts lower; steer top 43.50; choice steer beef 41.50-43 50 Produce A punch in the mouth and a few screams were all it look Friday to thwart two holdup at- tempts at a tavern and a gro- cery store. A man carrying a handgun en- lered the Blue Moon tavern 3108 First avenue NE, and an- nounced a holdup, but fled when !he owner punched him in the mouth. Bud Spaulding, 44, the owner, :old police the man left without obtaining anything. The suspect was described as 30 years of age, thin build no and wearing a tan coat. The second holdup attempi ended unsuccessfully when the owner of the Thrifty food store, 1201 Fourth avenue SE, began screaming. Police said t h e would-be holdup man left the store after pointing a gun at the owner, Loretta Haddy, and announcing a holdup. Her reaction, police said, was to let out a scream. The suspect was described as a male, about 25, 5 feet 9 inches, .70 pounds, and wearing a beige knitted hat, pink checkered slacks and a leather jacket. Neither of the intended vic- ims was hurt in the attempts. formed Presbyterian church, Waldon, N.Y., for 15 years be- fore coming here. He served at Sparta, 111., prior to that time. He is a graduate of Geneva college, Beaver Falls, Pa., and t h e Reformed Presbyterian seminary in Pittsburgh. The family will reside in the church manse at 1145 A avenue. Sell Houses Mr. and Mrs. Emery Miller of Birmingham, Iowa, have sold their income property at 1260 Thirteenth ave- nue to Mr. and Mrs. Thomas R. Lindgren of 2568 Fifth avenue. Possession will be given April 25. Sale was made by Fred J. Gibson and Co., Realtors. The same firm sold the house at 191 Third avenue, owned by and Mrs. Davis Ferguson, t VIr. and Mrs. David Stevens 2650 Tenth street. Possessio ivill be given April 15. Wanted part-time bartender Stickney's in Marion. school Grace Baptist 440 Sout Fifteenth street. The Rev. Do R. Martin. Sunday school Worship and Squaw Creek Baptist Wi kins school. The Rev. Kerm W. Jelmeland. Worship 9. Sun day school 10. Robins Faith Bible Cornc of Main and Mentzcr. The Re% Ed Bateman. Worship an 6. Sunday school St. Joseph's Catholic _ 99 Fifth avenue. The Rev. Justi A. Kane, the Rev. Martin Pfab and the Rev. John Case will celebrate mass Saturday a 7 p.m. at the school, 143 Fourteenth street, and Sunda at 7. and 11 a.m. at th church and 10 and at the school. Marion Christian 1050 Me Gowan boulevard. The Gandhi, Nehru Are Subjects of Course at Coe "Gandhi and Nehru: Arch: tects of Peace and Builders o Modern a Coe colleg summer term course, will focu not only on the men, but the po itical, social and economic dev elopment in India from 1916 t< present. "Gandhi's adherence to truth ove and non-violence in a worlc of haired and violence caugh he imagination of the world.' said Dileep Patwardhan, visit ng professor of history at Coe. "And Nehru's efforts to pro- 29.25-30.50; 250-270 28.50 NEW YORK PRODUCE NEW YORK (AP) (USDA) Who sale egg offerings of large adequate, m diums ample. Demand fairly good arge, but slow on mediums Frida Whites: Fancy laroe 57-60. Fancy me um 47-50. Fancy smalls 31-35 Butter offerings adequate. Demai CHICAGO PRODUCE CHICAGO (UPI) Butter: Firm: score 7VA; K2 score 7Q3'j; 90 score 68Vi Eqgs: Unproved to steady; cents p dozen; extra large white 60-63; Ian white 59-61; mediums 49-51. -29.50: sows 270-330 lb. 26.25- lb. 25.75-26.50. Packing plants: U.S. 1-3 200- 230 lb. 30.50-31.00; 230-250 lb. lb. i8.75- 30.00; sows 270-330 lb. 2650- 27.50; 330-400 lb. 26.25-27.00. Waterloo Hogs were SI.00 lower and sows were 50c lower. Packing plant delivery No. 2 butchers weighing 200- 230 Ibs. No. 2 sows weighing 300 lbs 527.50. WEBSTER CITY LIVESTOCK WEBSTER CITY (API Central Iowa Stockyards Friday, cattle 25, rot enouah to set market trend; cows and bulls steady; cows 24.50-30.50; bulls 34.00- 33.CO. Hoas 1.500; butchers 1.25-1.50 lower; bulk 30.50-31.50, top 32.00; sows 50 low- er; bulk 27.0047.50, top 28.00; boars 200- 250 tb 27.00-28.00; 250-350 lb 25 00-26 00; 350-700 lb 26.50-27.00. Monday estimate: cattle 200, hogs 900. LIVESTOCK FUTURES CHICAGO (AP) Futures tradino Friday: Live Beef Cattle April 41.17 40.17 44.50 46.85 46.25 46.60 47.00 Seek Fine for Non-Screening Of Passenger MIAMI (AP) U.S. attornei Friday asked federal' court penalize Eastern Airlines :or allegedly permitting 51 pe sons to board flights withou screening their possessions. The suil claims undetecte possessions included a pistol i a woman's purse in Atlanta las Aug. 6 and a pair of short-bla. ed souvenir swords carried in bag by a woman at Miami In ternational airport last Aug. 28 It also charges Eastern wit permitting 49 passengers t board at Curacao and Arub without inspecting them in three-day period last Sep (ember. The suit charges Eastern wit violating a portion of the Feder al Aviation Act designed to pre vent aircraft hijackings. An Eastern spokesman said ni statement would be issued unti the charges were examined. Hi said Eastern hires security agencies rather than carry ou its own security operations. school Worship Robins Church of th Brethren _ 355 Second street The Rev. Harold Justice. Sun day school 10. Worship 11 am 7. Church of Christ 108' Eighteenth street. William Cain Bible school 10. Worship 11 and Ascension Lurlieran 221. Grand avenue. The Rev. Denny J. Brake. Worship 8 and 10 Sermon: "Glory to God in the Lutheran Church of the Res urrection _ 2770 Eighteenth avenue. The Rev. Otto A Zwanziger. AVorship 8 and Sunday school St. Paul's Lutheran (Missour Synod) _ 915 Twenty-seventl street. The Rev. John D. Huber jr. Worship 8 and Sun day school First United Methodist 1277 Eighth avenue. The Rev Glen W. Lamb and the Hev. J M. Steffenson. Worship' 8, and 11. Sermon: "Selections from the Easter Messiah''. Sun- day school Prairie Chapel United Meth- odist Route 3. The Rev. live Cook. Sunday school Worship First Presbyterian 802 Twelfth street. The Rev. Jay A. Wilier. Sunday school August .....................47.85 October 47.on 47.40 Decembe; February Live Hogs Aaril June July Auoust October December February April 33.IO 37.40 39.30 38.90 38.00 ..39.50 .40.40 36.25 Nixon Expected To Yield Tapes LOS ANGELES (AP) The u.v Los-Angeles Times quoted an 3--M unnamed "high White House of- ficial" Saturday as saying Pres- ident Nixon is expected to in- form the house judiciary com- mittee Tuesday that he will re- linquish some of the tapes of requested presidential conversa- tions. -Caflle-aSd-ca-lVes: staugMer steer, TtlC JS( 3S on PGS f'cmantjcf' n cows v an corv by the house panel will be for- OMAHA LIVESTOCK OMAHA (AP) (USDA) Hogs: WOO; barrows and ailts moderately active after slow early trade; large share 2.00 lower, instances 2.35 lower; 1.3 200-250 lb 30.25- 32.00; 2-3 250-270 lb 28.75-31.00; 2-4 270-320 lb 28.00-25.50. Sows 1.00-1.50 lower; 350- 650 lb 26.25-27.00. SIOUX CITY LIVESTOCK SIOUX CITY (AP) (USDA) butchers rather slow; 175-225 warded "because some of the conversations don't relate to mote tolerance anrf 8 and Scrmc AA Anniversary Noted in among the nations of the world and his novel concept o non-alignment won a unique Crowd and the Reformed Presbyterian 965 South Fifteenth stre The Rev. John M. McMill for India in the school 10. Worship The 30th anniversary sf the Alcoholics Anonymous chapter in Cedar Rapids is being marked this weekend at the Town House. An open, house was held this afternoon, and an open of nations." The course will be taught from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. five days a week for three weeks during the expanded summer term al Coe by Patwardhan, who teaches the India, study group. Church of God (Sever )ay) 600 Ninth avenue. J. Kuryluk, pastor. Song s vice Sabbath school worship 11-, Saturday. Frid Bible study 8. United Seventh D Brethren _ 2400 Second av will begin at 8 p.m. An Alanon meeting will take place Sunday morning at in the Town House convention hall, followed by a banquet at An AA member from California, who formerly lived in Cedar Rapids, will speak at the (INPAC) program. To register for "Gandhi and Nehru" or other summer term courses at Coe, call (319) 364-1511, extension 428 (or extension 382 between p.m. and midnight) or write Summer Session, Box 91W, Coe College, W. Allen Bond, past Worship 10, church school Saturday. Receives Navy Contrac The navy has awarded contract to Rockw Smokey the Collins Radio C division. Creator Is Cyprus (AP) A U.N. official me' Saturday contract calls for Colli to supply communication a MIAMI (AP) Albert and Turkish Cypriot equipment to suppc le, 74, the man who in an effort to avert aircraft. The work will Smokey the Bear, died in Cedar Rapids. of a He created Smokey in 1945 for a U.S. Forest Service fire Storm Toil, vention campaign. Forestery officials had wanted him to use a raccoon or Saved by other small animal. But (AP) De- ed at about 90. charced came up with a jeans-wearing, shovel-toting bear who cventual-y became the character of the heavy loss of life in Wednesday's torn adoes, the lublic warning system states, leaving more than 3 dead and thousands injured. lopular song and have worked well, the Cleveland, White told r tion chief weatherman say. jporters: "My impression, Staehle was born in Munich numbers of to people in Kentuck 899 and came to the U.S. have been and here, is that t head of the A poster of a cow and National system performed ve started his commercial art Atmospheric tha tthe warnings weer reer in 1918. The poster won said Friday during a We talked to many ci award and caught the eye of tornado in other states who ha Borden Co., which turned it can't stop acts of the warnings and ha a milk-selling mascot, said. He called the cover." Staehle moved to "the worst said he concluded "the Miami about 16 years ago ever seen from a few lives were saved z turned from commercial to Associate result of the warnings, bt John Townsend and the does not say that we sti Weather Service do better, and we intend 30 YEARS AGO Cressman, made a to investigate the ac agreed the luftwaffe's power flight to Kentucky, of the warning systsn defend the Reich had dropped Ohio for talks with the country t percent since the start of agency officials and any deficiencies tha Allied offensive against its at some of the exist and seek remedie duction centers. A family of twisters, those deficiencies." K- 11. ,10, Day ve- tor. 11 .MEDIA, Pa. (AP) A man convicted of helping arrange the slaying of Joseph "Jock" Ya- blonski says he was told by a confederate that former United Mine Workers President W. A. "Tony" Boyle knew nothing about the murder plot. "Is that the Boyle's lawyer, Charles Moses, asked William Prater. "Yes, sir, it replied Prater, a former UMW official in Tennessee who testified Fri- day as a prosecution witness. He is serving a life sentence. Moses had read Prater a por- !ion of a handwritten statement Prater made to authorities say- ng: "On at least two occasions Albert Pass told me Tony Boyle did not know anything about th plan to get rid of Joe Yablon ski. Boyle is accused in the Dec 31, 1969, slaying of Yablonsk and his wife and daughter as :hey slept in their southwestern Pennsylvania home at Clarks- ,'ille. The prosecution claims Boyle ordered Yablonski killed am pproved use of in union unds to pay the hired killers. The killings occurred three veeks after Yablonski lost a tattle to unseat Boyle and as Yablonski was threatening to go o court to seek to have the elec- ion overturned. Prater testified he was asked o help in killing Yablonski by his union superior, Pass, then secretary-treasurer of District 19, covering Kentucky and Ten- nessee, and also an internation- District 20 of Alabama. Pass was convicted last June) of murder. Prater was convicted March, 1973, and shortly after- ward admitted his guilt. ?ites at Sigourney For Paul Seibel, 65 Adolph eibel, 65, a partner in Seibel lardware here until his retire- nent last year, died in Veter- ns hospital, Iowa City, Friday ollovving a long illness. Born April 12, 1908, he was a radua'i: of Sigourney high chool, attended Iowa Wesleyan ollege, and took part in the o r m a n d y invasion during Vorld war II as a navy Seabee. He was married to the former ivian Arlon. He was a member the Presbyterian church and he American Legion. Surviving in addition to nisi ife are his mother, Mrs. Frank! eibel, Sigourney; a sister, Lou-' He Howalt, Sioux Falls, S.D., nd a brother, James Seibel, gourney. Services will be Monday at 2 m. at the Sigourney United resbyterian' church by the ev. William Riek. Burial: 1 e a s a n t Grove cemetery, eynolds' funeral home is in large. Delay of Trial ForEhrlichman LOS ANGELES (AP) Former presidential adviser John Ehrlichman has been granted a postponement in his perjury trial because of delays in getting transcripts of Water- gate grand jury proceedings. Judge Gordon Ringer Friday postponed the trial from April 15 until May 20 after Ehrlich- man's attorneys argued that he had not yet received transcripts of testimony by two of Ehrlich man's former aides, Davit Young and Egil Krogh. lowan's Papers 1 On Man Shot In New Orleans NEW ORLEANS lice today hoped to learn the identity of a critically-wounded man believed connected with the murders of a Jefferson j parish couple and the disap- pearance of an Iowa man. The man was shot in the left chest following a holdup at-." tempt at a New Orleans service station. Officers found fin- gerprints of the man Friday and sent them to the FBI's Washing- ton headquarters. Investigators found credit cards on the wounded man" belonging to Robert of Des Moines, and others belonging to Wayne J. Sulli- Marion Youth Wins Contest Tern P.arman, a student at Marion high school, was first- place winner in speaking com- jetition held Saturday by the Sunrise Optimist club. His winning humorous speech :arned him the right to compete n Optimist zone competition. Marion Toastmasters club nembers judged the Sunrise club's competition. Independence Breakin INDEPENDENCE-A breakin at the Lucky-10 Lanes bowling alley was discovered by a pa- rolman on duty about a.m. oday. Entry was gained by ireaking a window. An undeter- mined amount of change was aken and some vandalism was eported. Sullivan, 52, and his wife, Wanda, 50, found shot to; death in their home in suburban Metairie Thursday. Authorities said Sullivan had_ been shot in the neck, chest, ab- domen and back, then put in a large bedroom closet. His wife was shot once in the head, and, her body stuffed in a small hall" closet. Jefferson parish Coroner Dr. Charles Odom said she wore a silver chain around her neck: "and it appears from the many-- abrasions on her neck that she" was either dragged or strangled with it." The wounded man was shot in New Orleans Thursday. Police" said a man who tried to hold a service station, shot and wounded Louis Hyde, then beat lim with a pistol and a fire ex-: inguisher. A friend of Hyde's, William Vidacovich, 48, gave chase and cornered the suspect in a ware- louse. The man advanced on Vidaco- vich, brandishing a gun, and said "kill me, kill me for what 've police said. Vidacovich fired a warning shot into the floor, then shot the man in the chest, officers said. U. S., Saudi Arabia Agree On Economic Cooperation WASHINGTON (AP) -jthe Saudi cabinet committee- Agreement in principle has beenj handling economic and reached on close economic co-j t operation between the U.S. and! V y' A Saudi Arabia. It is expected to KlnS Faisals American-..... open the way to major Saudi in- lrained advlsers are lo vestments in this country. be seekinS a solid investment; A terse announcement by the ke'for the estimated state department Friday said bllllon the Perslan Gulf nation'ls "the two countries are prepared j MPected to earn for lts oil this _: to expand and give more con-p'ear- Crete expression to cooperation' in the field of economics, tech-; supply of the kingdom's require- ifes in Decorah for Freeman Alberts, 76 DECORAH Freeman Al-'ments for defense purposes." berts, 76, a heating and plumb- Knowledgeable sources said ing contractor here for many the agreement may encourage years, died Thursday evening. greater U.S. participation in in- The Saudi Arabians also are greatly interested in using their nology and industry, and in to produce petrochemicals Born Nov. 22, 1897, in De- dustrialization of Saudi Arabia, !year. corah, he was married to world's leading oil-exporting and to establish other indus- tries. Negotiations reportedly are under way to build, with U.S. help, a steel mill that would produce 200 million tons, a Mclntosh Sept. country. Held on Charge survivors include ms wife; a' The state department said. INDEPENDENCE James James of Decorah; a Prince Fahd Bin 19, Independence, was' -......o-------1 held in the Buchanan !Marion, and 11 grandchildren, .the U.S. "in the near future" toiCounty jail today in lieu of Services: Monday at 2p.m. in'discuss details with on a charge of larceny of the Decc Lutheran and Secretary of motor vehicle Clinton told Friends may call at Olson-Fiels-1 Kissinger, i police he had taken a car in the jtul funeral home Saturday eve-! Prince Fahd is a Friday morning and later 'prime minister and chairman of ditched it in the country. lower; U.S. 1-3 190-240 lb 31.25-31.75; SOWS 1.25.1. 75 lower; U.S. 1-3 ID Watergate." He said the tape? probably won't be delivered to DRESSED MEATS DES MOINES (AP) (USDA) Mid- west carlo! meat trade report for Iowa and river market areas: Beef trade opened slow, late trade al- most at a standstill; demand improved mostly for early next weeK shipments; limited sales choice steer beef steady to 1.00 hishcr; a few sales choice heifer beef not enough to set market trend Choice steer beef 700-800 lb. yield grade 3 61.00-67.00, 800-900 lb yield grade 3 60.00-61.00; choice heifer beef 500-700 lb. yield grade 3 61.00. Fresh pork cut trade, loins tind bulls not established; picnics steady to lower; skinned hams 14-17 lb. 1.50 lower, 17-20 lb. .50 hidhcr, 20 lb. up sleady '.o l.CO lower; seedless belllr-s steady to 1.00 higher. Loins n lb. down export; picnics 6-8 lb. 37.00, 8 lb. up skinned hams 14-17 lb. 17-20 lb 55 50 56.00, 20-26 lb. 50.50-51.5U, 36-30 lb. 47 50, 76 lb. UP 46.50-47.00; seedless bellies 10-17 lb. 4J.SO-43.00. 12-14 lb. 14-16 lb. 43.00-4J.50, 16-18 lb. 38.25, 18 2C lb. 36.S0.38.25, 20-25 lb. 33.00-34.00 t h e committee until after Easter. The White House has been given a Tuesday deadline to comply with the house panel's Feb. 25 request for tapes of 41 conversations between Nixon and lop aides, or face subpoena. PECK'S OPEN HOUSE ENDS SUNDAY AT 5 P.M. ANOTHER ONE RAY KONL'REALTORS SIGN OF SIGN OF CHAOS SUCCI 1833 FIRST, AVENUE S.E. PHONE 365-8681 are invited to our The Morris Plan consumer loan and securities investment office located in downtown Cedar Rapids in the American Building has just completed the remodeling ol their first floor office area. We have enlarged our quarters and expanded our personnel to serve you more efficiently in comfortable and colorful surroundings. Friends like you have always helped us celebrate these occasions. On April 8 and 9 we will hold an Open House. Come visit our garden and fountain display. There will be refreshments and free seeds for everyone. With over fifty prizes available, you could win a blooming, potted plant or garden accessory. Swing into Spring and grow with us! Hours: Monday, April 8 to Tuesday, April 9 to Morris America Financial Corporation 100 American Building Cedar Rapids, Iowa 52401   

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