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Cedar Rapids Gazette: Wednesday, April 3, 1974 - Page 4

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   Cedar Rapids Gazette (Newspaper) - April 3, 1974, Cedar Rapids, Iowa                                 2A  Tbe <’edar Rapids Gazette: Wed.. April 3, 1374  Jones Grand Jury To Get Murder Case  Riley Hearing Fuss Aired on Senate Floor  'Watch Out,' Weatherman Tells  owans  Bv Associated Press  ANAMOSA — One of two men ,  cause  danger to livestock in unprotected areas Wednesday night in  By Prank Nye  DES MOINES — The dif-j An early spring storm was I . . ,,    ..    ,    ,    .    .ferences between Sen. Tom dumping precipitation on Iowa  charged in the Match to slaying| Ri , ey (R . Cod{tr Rapids) and at  m'd-afternoon Wednesday.  o two e ar apt s  otna S f ' r ‘ s   mem b ers  of his appropriations The National Weather Service was oun ovpi o the .ones  su b comm i Ree ()VPr  short ad-j warns that northerly winds of 25 county grand july ollowing a  vance n0 |j t -e of public hearings to 35 miles an hour wi preliminary hearing Wednes-  on a  controversial nonpublic  school busing bill spilled over The preliminary hearing tor onto Hie senate floor Wednes-1 northwest Iowa.  George Junior Nowlin. 31. rural  da y.    The    storm is bringing much  Keystone, was closed to report-, sen. Eugene Hill (D-Newton I colder readings to the state ers and all spectators as was a ( 0 j d  (he senate “I am irked” along with rain, sleet and even  m  11  a r  hearing in ( edar  over  (foe short notice Riley gave.snow in some sections.  him Tuesday of a hearing origi- Precipitation in Iowa is com-nally set for 5 p.m. Thursday.:mg from an intense storm sys-only to be called off later Tues-*tem moving northeastward out day. (See story Page 20    j°f Kansas.  Hill said he learned “by scut-j A mid afternoon radar report tlebutt“ the hearing had been j Wednesday indicated rain over scrubbed after he and Sen Joan most ot Iowa, and the rain was Orr I D-Grinnell) had gone to mixed with sleet or snow in the Connolly, 17, southeast of Ana- some length lo line up speakers ‘extreme'northwest, mosa, and then robbing and against the bill    Occasional rain or thunder-  murdering Michael Servey, 18.    ........... showers are forecast for the  Rapids.  Defendant Atwell Junior Conner. 29, of near Bertram, did not appeal* in Jones district court. Authorities said his attorney was ill.  The two men are accused of raping and murdering Maureen  southeast of Cedar Rapids, Wednesday's hearing for Nou-  W'eek's Notice?  southeast half of the state with  Hill said he also was trying to cooler readings Wednesday  Un didn’Tbegin until 9-20 a m It     h i* th  sc 5? du,e  )  “ h   he ; nighl '  es P ecial| y     norlh    b     could    attend    the    Thursday    hear-    west.  Riley answered Hill. ex-  was still not over by 11:30 Two highway patrolmen had been called for courtroom security, but Nowlin's attorney asked if they would possibly be witnesses later on in the case.  ■nie Jones county attorney i  lail ^ h,  h .,7 set lhe '  hear  said he could not say for sure if the patrolmen would be witnesses. so Conmey asked them to leave.  Anamosa Police Chief Dick Stivers was then called to pro-  ins when he learned it had been  Uws Wednesday nlghl win be    C .! e >.    j     L     .    . from the 20s northwest to the  Hill suggested that Riley S lve ilower 40s in the southeast. a week's notice if the hearing is rescheduled  The National Weather Service is predicting two to four inches of snow for extreme northwest Iowa, western Nebraska and southern South Dakota. Four inches or more of new snow is anticipated in southern Minnesota.  ing at the convenience of those requesting    it and    that  Thursday was the only available day for one this week.  Riley said the request for the, vide^* courtroom * security'* The  hcarin ^  came from  Davenport Iowa’s weather will remain county attorney said    he    would! 3 " 1    offpred J°     hold     hear-;windy and cold Thursday with a  not be called as a witness in the : ,n K 'here in keeping with hts chance of snow flumes in the murder trial    program of “taking government    northwest and    rain    showers    in  On iv several other persons  10 the  P eo P le ra,her ,han sit,in S     the     southeast.    Highs Thursday:  aside from reporters were pres-  here in the ivorv tower "     wi!l    be in the 308 and    408   ent for the hearing    coiled off    the hearing,  The Jones county    grand    jury    Riley     sa id, atter    learning    some  will convene Friday. Tbe pre- subcommittee members were liminary hearing for Conner I unhappy about it He said Sena-  —Reinecke—  (Continued from Page I.)  was continued to April ll at I  ,nrsBas8Var \ I  G !) st     ;fore Reinecke told him on Sept.  J7. 1971. Settlement of the IT!'  on:   m     sa)    and    Karl    Nolin (D-Ralston),  Nowlin s bail on the rape     case    had  been • announced  charge was continued at , '  b v dldn j  tbmk tbPre  July 31 1971 $100,000. No bail was set on To  nceded t0 be a hear,n 8 murder charge  Hultman Begins Second Term as U. S. Attorney  Evan “Curly" Hultman was sworn in Tuesday in Cedar Rapids federal court for a .second four-year term as United States attorney for the northern district of Iowa.  T Ii e reappointment would seem to rule out his running for the U.S. senate or the house, of representatives, as has been rumored.  i   1  In commenting on the politi-, cal situation. Hultman said. [“Very frankly, I gave it serious consideration. But at this time I ; feel I could serve best as a member of the department of justice."  “As important as the law-making function is. I visualized the times and conditions. And I felt that I would be running out on something that is important to the public and to me personally."  Hultmans reappointment has been in the process for several months.  His name was submitted to President Nixon by then Attorney General Elliot Richardson Senate confirmation was de j layed, however, due to the upheaval brought on by Watergate.  Hultman was resubmitted for approval of the President by new Attorney General William Saxbe. and was subsequently confirmed by the senate.  In swearing in Hultman. chief judge Edward McManus noted that his “service in this capacity has been most honorable."  Hultman, 48. of Waterloo, first took office on Aug I, 1989.  He served two terms as Blackhawk county attorney and two terms as Iowa attorney general. In 1984 he was defeated bv Harold Hughes for governor.  From 1984 to 1989 Hultman    was    Y-...4.L    IO    I—J     lr 4-  in private law practice in    Wa-    *    OUTm,    IO,    fiuiT  terloo.  Alter the swearing-in Wednesday Hultman commented “It has been an extreme pleasure :and a distinct honor to serve in ibis office. And I look forward : to the challenge of fair    and  : honest administration of    jus-  Itice."  Manchester Man Changes Plea on U. S. Tax Counts  In Collision of Cycle and Truck  An 18-year-old youth was in good condition Wednesday after he was injured in collision between a motorcycle and truck.  George D. Biggs, 637 Twenty-second avenue SW. the motorcyclist, suffered a shoulder injury when he tried to pass a truck. Police said the truck, driven by Max C. Mauck, 35. of Swisher, attempted to make a left turn and collided with Biggs.  Biggs was ticketed for driving  Kenneth A. Bilby, rural Man-j chester, changed his plea to guilty Wednesday morning in ,,    .,    ,  I Cedar Rapids federal court  on  on the wrong side of the road.  two counts of filing; fraudulent I^ e  accident occurred in the federal income tax returns.    J700 block of J street    SW.  Hilby was indicted    March 7i Bi ^’ motorcycle left    tire  tor attempting to evade taxes ™ rks  "easuring % feel, po-totaling $5,853.51 for l%7 and  llce  ' sald -1988. He had pled innocent to    *    *    *  this charge March 25.     A     second motorcyclist suffered  The Manchester farmer, 41. tniurte.sTuesday.Terrance Lam could be sentenced in as many  a rum l8 '  of 1011  Alburnett road, as five years in prison and  u  Marlan ; ?' as lr f ted al   k  Mclcv   as much as $10,008 f.ne on each  ho f ,a fm '  du,s and brmses   and released. Lanstrum was in-  ,.    jured in the 10(H) block of    Mf.  Hilby remains free on his own  iVernon road SE when hc |osl   ^cognizance bond ol $10,000.  con j ro l  0 f  b j s  motorcycle on pending pre-sentence reports.  sand jn  , he  ,. oad hj|  f he  , ane   divider and then struck a road sign.  * * *  Two women suffered minor in-  A zoning request that would i uriea in  ,  a    amdenl   have permitted construction of  Tuesda >''  bl "  refused ,rans P or -  Bid Opening Set  On Sidewalk Work  The city council Wednesday voted to go ahead with construction of a sidewalk on Forest drive vSE between Grande avenue and Bever avenue.  Several residents appeared at a public hearing last week to protest the proposed sidewalk. which will be built on the west side of Forest drive.  Wednesday the council unanimously passed four resolutions dealing with the project: overruling the objections, filing a resolution of necessity, adopting plans, specifications and form of contract and ordering construction.  Bids will be opened April 17.  Council Rejects Rezoning Plea  City Implements 'Weather Days'  A new personnel rule for city employes, entitled “weather days." was adopted by the city council Wednesday.  Occasionally, bad weather causes curtailment of some work, and employes are either sent home early or given a day off. with full pay.  The new rule provides that employes who are required to remain at work during those days will receive compensatory time off.  Pedestrian Hit By Stolen Car  Police are looking for the driver of a stolen car which struck a pedestrian and later hit two vehicles.  The incident started shortly after midnight Tuesday in the parking lot of Polly’s Penthouse, 4415 First avenue SE. where the car was stolen.  Police described the sequence of events:  The car struck Vincent A. Gatto. 15. of 318 E avenue NW. in the parking lot.  Gatto was tossed onto the hood and carried to the First avenue entrance where he w-as thrown to the ground.  The driver turned west onto First avenue and drove to the intersection of Fifth street and First avenue E where he struck two other cars.  After the collision, the driver got cut and ran from the scene, police said.  (iatto was treated at Mercy hospital for a cut and sprain to the left hand and released.  No injuries were reported in the incident involving the other two cars, owned by Fred Level. 154 Edgewood road NW, and Roy Saub, 707 Forty-third street NE.  Pick up the phone today and let a want ad go to work for von. Dial 398-8234  condominium units at 1431 Edgewood road NW was rejected by the city council Wednesday morning.  tation to a hospital. Police said Karen Lee O’Grady. 33, and Barbara Pickering. 48. both of Van Horne, were injured in the 2800 block of First avenue E  L. I. Enterpiises petitioned tor ^j le car dr j ven  by Mrs. o'Grady the zoning change for 1.93 acres j veered to the right side of the from R I to R-3G. The request; road R)  avoid .striking a car that was approved, 5-4, by the city  was  changing lanes, police said, planning commission, and drew  and  , hen hit a  , ight po)e Mrs   fire I rom residents of the area O'Grady suffered face cuts and who said the condominiums Mrs. Pickering reported suffer-would create drainage prob- j ng a  bead and hand injury, lems. traffic hazaids and de- No charges were flied creased property values.    __________  The city council's vote to deny Want ady offer the greatest the change was unanimous selection of home olferings!  RENT  A Lovely New  Baldwin Pianol  ★ All Rent Applies when you buy!  Cedar Rapids Piano & Organ  Sine* 1930    MW.    "Sob"    lutttlmon  I IO Third Ave. S.W.  Opposite Peoples Bank  Van Gilst Genial    .?*     Sh , er ,!^ n    U '' T    a    sub ;  This brought Van Gilsl In his , s ' dli "7 ,°  11 1 and d P erator  l   0  feet to deny he had told RileyT,  h ?*Tj!L S ? n D ? 8 °'  l " d   Seized Items Can Be     |here waJ no wcd for a hearl  ; pledged $400.000 toward coneen.  Held, Judge Rules    He    was    irked. Van Gilst said.  b0d ex P' n *V  ,be J ,n " e  ,‘ h *  ,    a a    U    only    in    thai    Riley    had    not    con-     ( ’ ° 1     , planded  «•  bold  " s 19,2   Items seized under search    *    , hp    s    u    b c o    m m     ,     lt e  .invention    there  warrants on the residence of ^ before scheduling lhe  A  tonner Democrat. Reinecke  George Nowlin, rural Keystone. : hcar[     ran for congress as a Republi-  accused in Linn county of the! .    ...    .    hatter    in-! can    m    1964    anc *     won    was    re *  slaying and robbins; of Michael  formed  J .. ' Van f;iIst concluded  J elected in 1968 and 1988 He  Servey. 18, can be held    for    po*-,  |h     ,    ,     l0    o|h     served    in    Hie    house    until    1989.  sible use as evidence.    .    .  ,    business  District court Judge Harold  Victor, in an order filed Tuesday afternoon, held that “no person shows specific and legal cause why the items seized pursuant to the search warrant  Newspaper Wage Controls Lifted  when Gov, Ronald Reagan appointed him lieutenant governor to succeed Robert Finch, who joined the Nixon administration as secretary of health, education and welfare.  Elected in 1978 Reinecke. born Jan. 7. 1924.  tm . ,  JL1J  WASHINGTON (UPI) - Wage should not be forfeited and held  con t ro i s were  lifted Tuesday on  by the state to be used as evi- ^ newspaper industry by the was elected to the office on the dence in certain criminal prose- Cc^t of IJ\ing Council.    Reagan ticket in 1970. He is a  h...ae ixoia  Filed with lhe  Federal Regis- graduate of California Institute  M      d K     ter were regulations exempting of Technology and a profes-  ‘ The items seized include a  em P lo >^  in tbp  newspaper in- sional mechanical engineer.  1964 Chevrolet Belair, ^wo-door ' dus t r \, fron ^ wage controls the Settlement of the ITT case I-ol-white with red interior with  counci1 said '  But cxecut,v e and lowing the pledge of convention license number 48-8272 now  in  ivanab,e  compensation person- money brought allegations that the custody of the Cedar Rapids  ncl remain  subject to economic the money influenced the deci-police department'. Round in lhe-slabilizalion program rcgula- sion. The case made headlines search of the car and seized H 0 "*    " f arl >' ' 972 when  Celoms!  were two latent print lifts, vac- “This action is in accordance • ,ac » (  Anderson produced a uumed material, a stocking cap    with our objective to remove    memorandum horn an    ITT Gland cigaret butts.    controls    selectively where con-    *j c ' a ! alleged to make a    connec-  Also ordered held for use as d it ions permit. We have now de-  l(,a  between the settlement and evidence by the state were ar- (ermined that conditions are ph' c lg e  tides found in the search of such that wages and salaries Earlier this year Reinecke de-George Nowlin and his resi-    paid in    the newspaper industry    manded that Jaworski's office  dence at 622 Eleventh avenue    should    be exempted.' CLC    givp him a lie detector    lest on  SE, apartment of Mable Irene Director John Dunlop said. his role The FRI administered  Franks.    --------  ,he fpst -  Items found included some Want to rent your garage? A Reinecke was one of the key clothing and a pair of blue-gray want ad will dolt quickly and at supporters of efforts to take the slacks    low cost. Dial 398-8234    1972 convention to San Diego.  OUR SAVINGS STACK UP AS HIGH AS THE LAWALLOWS!  Passbook Savin9s 5% with No Minimum             MINIMUM      MATURITY    RAT!    AMOUNT      3-month    5’/*%    $ SOO      6-month    $'/*%    SOO      I -year    6%    500      2-year    6%    SOO      2 Vz-years    6%    SOQ      4-years    7'A%    lOOO     -  FDIC regulations require substantial penalty for  early withdraw! prior to maturity.  ♦  Get the highest rate of intofest whore you get FREI CHECKING at the Home of the freel  GUARANTY BANK & TRUST CO.  Mf MHR (OIC  lr* St. A -I rd \\e.    IHI*    limit    HI.    \    I    IMI    .la ( -»|»M    Hr.    VU  ••HOH* IHi ll I I A  BECKER’S-PEOPLES FURNITURE  Open Thursday 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.  SITTING PRETTY!  Pretty Styles — Pretty Colors  SAVE up to  $ 60°° $08°° $7000  Everybody alway* needs choirs, and Becker j Peoples Furniture is where you'll find scores of styles to choose from to give your home a fresh new look of comfort. Big choirs, petite chairs, spacious lounge chairs, accent chairs, swivel-rockers, recliner choirs. You ll find just what you want now at Becker's Peoples Furniture in downtown Cedar Ropids Special groupings at $68 $78-$88  Whatever style chair it s waiting for you now! You'll find many styles, and colors, types for every room decor and money-saving prices, too. Come to Becker's Peoples Furniture now and choose the chairs just right for your home Mediterranean style. Colonial style, Spanish style, modern style, Piovm-cial and Spanish Styles to choose from.  Phone  366-2436  21 5 First Ave. SE  Always Easy Terms Free Delivery  PEOPLES  FURNITURE   

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