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Cedar Rapids Gazette: Friday, March 8, 1974 - Page 4

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   Cedar Rapids Gazette (Newspaper) - March 8, 1974, Cedar Rapids, Iowa                                The Cedar Rapids Gazette: Frl.. Mar. 8, 1974 Bargaining Baffle "Jusf Legislator Says (Continued from Page 1.) the prolonged debate requires binding final offer arbitration as a last resort measure of settling deadlocks in contract negotiations. Rep. Frank Crabb (R- Denison) predicted Ihc bill with its compulsory arbitra- tion feature "will cost the public million over the next few years." Compusory collective bar- gaining and mandatory arbi- tration are the provisions that rob elected officials of their traditional powers, said Rep. Richard Welden (R-Iowa He charged that lobbyists for the Iowa State Education Assn. and labor groups, which he called "a ruthless special interest had pushed through "a bill that is unwanted and is not in the best interests of the majority of the people of Iowa." Rep. Lester Menke (R- Calumet) spoke out against what he called the "flannel- mouthed Pied Pipers who sing their sweet songs that are supposed to lead the rats of the school board to the river for drowning. "You've been led down the primrose path by some people who said this is good for edu- Menke said. "It isn't." Rep. Robert Kreamer (R- Des Monies) branded the bill a "sell-out of education" be- cause it contemplates forma- tion teacher unions instead of letting teachers negotiate on such issues as curriculum, textbooks and class size as he said they want to do. "This battle which has taken 12 days to fight has just begun, because I intend to come back here and be the lead sponsor on repeal of this Kreamer said. "Vote Out of Fear" Rep. James West (R-State Center) said he was convinced most of the backers were vot- ing for not because they favor it, "but because of that has been in- stilled 5n them by the ISEA and labor lobbyists." But Rep. Tom Higgins (D- Davenport) said nothing could be further from the truth than contentions of some opponents that the bill will breed strikes, particularly by teachers. "There is a healthy dose of preventive medicine against strikes in this Higgins said. He also termed "ludicrous hallucinations" contentions that lobbyists were responsible for the measure. He said lob- byists for the Iowa Farm Bu- reau, Iowa Taxpayers Assn. and other groups were !as ac- tive against the measure as the ISEA and labor groups were for it. The Vote DES MOINES Here is how the Iowa house .voted Thursday bn the bill to allow public employes to bargain collectively on wages and working conditions, passed 56-43: Voting for: Avenson, Bittle, Brinck, Brunow, Butler, Byer- ly, Caffrey, Carr, John Clark, Joseph Clark, Cochran, Con- nors, Crawford, Cusack, Doyle, Drake, Egenes, Griffee, Fitzgerald, Hargrave, Harper, Harvey, Hennessey, Higgins, Hill, Horn, Howell, Jessee, Jordan, Junker, Riser, Krause, Lippold, Lipsky, Mc- Cormick, Mennenga, A. Mill- er, K. Miller, Monroe, New- hard, Nielsen, Norland, Nor- pel, Oakley, O'Halloran, Pat- chett, Poncy, Rapp, Reading- er, Rinas, Small, Stanley, Var- ley, Wells, Woods, Wuiff. Voting against: Anderson, Bennett, Bortell, Branstad, Crabb, Daggett, Danker, Den Herder, Dunlap, Dunton, Edelen, Ewing, Fer- guson, Fischer, Fisher, Free- m a n, Fullerton, Grassley, ilansen, Holden, Ilusak, llut- chins. K n o k e, Kreamer, Logue, McElroy, Mendenhall, Menke, Middlewart, Milieu, R. G. Miller, Pellett, Peterson, Roarda, Schroeder, Stephens, Stromer. Strothman, Tofte, Welden, West, Wyekoff. Absent or not voting: DeJong East lowans' Views Vary On Bargaining Reactions to passage of th collective bargaining bill Thurs day varied from pleasure on th side of teachers in the Cedai Rapids area to resignment o: the side of administrators. Ken Pfile, president-elect o the Cedar Rapids Education Assn., told The Gazette, "I thinl it's great. There were a lot o amendments, but nothing tha changes the senate version o the bill substantially." Three significant changes he cited were amendments limiting the scope of items to be negotiated, the addition of fact-finding steps in im- passe procedure, and the re- quirement that an organiza- tion must receive 50 percent of the potential votes in order to be elected bargaining agent, rather than 50 percent of the votes actually east. "Basically, I'm very pleased don't think it's going to change .hings that much in Cedar Rapids. It will make the process a little more formal." Pfile said he was optimistic lis organization, with about members, will be elected bar- gaining agent for the ;eachers in the Cedar Rapids Community school district. Norman Hanson, president ol he Cedar Rapids Federation of Teachers, called the passage 'ictory for organized labor, nol ust teachers, but for all public employe groups. "No More Begging" "Cedar Rapids teachers will elect a bargaining agent and the "loard will have to negotiate as :quals. The teachers won't have o beg anymore." Hanson said CRFT :has "an xcellent chance of being elect- d by the teachers as the bar- fining agent." Norman Lipsky, president of he Cedar Rapids Community chool board, was not available or comment Friday, but board member Barbara Bjornson said, 'We were expecting something would pass. I hope we can get along with this. :I don't anticipate Cedar Rapids having many prob- lems. There is an excellent relationship now (with the teachers) and I hope it can be preserved." Selby Ballantyne, superin- endent of Kirkwood Community college, said he did not know low much effect passage of the :ollective bargaining bill will lave on Kirkwood. Now They Have It "It's part of our way of life. 'his is the last of the people who did not have the right to collective bargaining and now hey have it." The Kirkwood board of direc- ors Jan. 28 went on record op- posing the collective bargaining bill. Supt. James G. liayne of, the College Community school district, told The Gazette, "I guess now that it's passed, we'll have to work with it. Thai's the legislative process, I guess." He forecast increased budget expenditures for salaries be- cause of passage of the bill. The College Community school board went on record Feb. 12 as opposing passage of the collective bargaining bill. Rotary Awards Scholarship to Coe Sophomore Julia A. Middleton, Coe soph omore from Cedar Rapids, has been named winner of the Ce- dar Rapids Rotary club's an nual scholarship for foreign study. Miss Middleton plans to spend her junior year of college studying at either the Roya Academy of Music in London or Julia A. Middleton New England college's campus at Arundel, Sussex, England. She is the daughter of Mrs. John Middleton, 213 Crandall drive NE, Cedar Rapids. A 1971 graduate of Linn -Mar high school, she studied at the Uni- versity of Iowa and Iowa State before transferring to Coe in January, 1973. Miss Middleton is a music major. She plays percussion en- semble in the Coe band and siano with the Coe chamber or- chestra and with the Cedar Rapids Symphony orchestra. Abbott Lipsky, chairman of :he Rotary club's scholarship committee, each year among applicants who live in Linn county and are students at either Coe or Mt. Mercy who are seeking to study abroad in heir third year of college. Miss Middleton is a member f Chi Omega social sorority and Mu Phi Epsilon, honorary music sorority for women. said the recipient is chosen from Kirkwood Plans Workshop Sought By Iowa Assn. A workshop on grounds main- enance methods will be held ext Friday at Kirkwood Com- munity college. The workshop, planned by the :ollege at the request of the owa Parks and Recreation Assn., is for persons already employed in grounds mainte- lance work. sessions are planned. Guttenberg Men Plead Innocent ELKADER Four Guttenberg nen pled innocent in Clayton i s t r i c t court Thursday to barges of resisting execution of rogress in connection an ncident last Dec. 23 in Gutten- lerg. Free on bond are Martin Behrend, 21, Larkin Ruttledge, 6, Michael Kann, 23, and Dan- el Schmidt, 22. No trial date :as been set. The four, indicted by a grand ury, were charged with inter- ering with Guttenberg police ifficers trying to make other ar- 'ests. Four Topics will be concrete con- itruction methods, purchase ol :afety equipment, public rela- ions, and chemicals for use in vegetation control. Registration fee will be legislation will be conducted at a.m. in the new horticul- ure operations center on the Kirkwood campus. The program vill end at 5 p.m. Advance registration is urged >y telephoning 393-5441 in Cedar lapids. Those who advance reg- ster by telephone will not be to make payment ol he fee until the day of the vorkshop. The Cedar Rapids m B BS> invites you to our Big ANNUAL COIN SHOW SAT.-SUN., MARCH FREE! Sat. 8-9 Sun. 8-5 See you all! I.B.E.W. HAU-Wiley Blvd.-off Hiway Food Served Buy, Sell, Trado Pair'IM'SpareSpecial LARGE SELECTION OF FRAME STYLES AND COLORS Buy 1 Pair at Reg.Price-Spare Pair Price single vision Offer Extended io March 30, 1974 DOWNTOWN CEDAR RAPIDS 106 1ST STREET S.E. OPE.N All DAY MONDAY THRU SAIURDAY Union is Okayed by Iowa City Employes CITY The city em-j ployes of Iowa City, with the ex- ception of secretaries, firemen j and police, will be represented! by Local 183 of the American Federaiiou of State, County andj Municipal Employes following vote of the employes Thursday. The vote was 96 yes and 43 no giving tho union a 6 percen majority more than needed fo representation. City Personnel Director Nic holas Smced said it was an ex tremely large turnout with onl; seven of the 178 employes eligi ble failing to vote. Swim Program Registration at YMCA Saturday Staff members will be on hand from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sat urday at the Central YMCA to assist both old and new youth members with the completion of spring program registration The spring programs, open to both boys and girls between the ages of 6 and 12, will get under way next week. Included in the spring class listing are instructional anc recreational gym and swim ses- sions as well as new classes in golf, tennis and track. Interested youngsters or par- ents are invited to drop in al the Central Y Saturday or to contact either Fred Sleeker or Larry Lutz at 366-6421. One special class, a junior lifesaving course limited to swimmers between the ages of .1 and 14, will begin Saturday rom a.m. to noon. Participants must be able to >ass a quarter-mile swimming endurance test for vhich will lead to certification by the Red Cross. The 12-week class will be leld weekly on Saturday morn- ngs through the end of May. Cost is for Central Y mem- iers and for non-members. Pioneer Dies MOSCOW (AP) Pyotr An- ikhin, 77, a pioneering Soviet irain specialist and a celebrat- ed physiologist, died Wednes- day. Army Assigns Two Recruiters ToCR. Posts Two soldiers from the Cedar Rapids area have been assigned hero for 60 days as recruiters. The pair will attempt to enlist local residents for duty at their respective posts. Pfc. Terry Strait, 20, of 1600 Ellis boulevard NW, has been authorized to enlist recruits for duty at Fort Riley, Kan. Strait, a military policeman, is a 1972 graduate of Kennedy high school. Pfe. Kenneth I. Schwendinger, 19. Montieello, has been author- ized to enlist recruits for duty at Fort Carson, Colo. Schwendinger, a 1973 gradu- ate of Montieello high school, is an infantryman. The army may extend their assignment in Cedar Rapids if it feels their stay is successful, ac- cording to Staff Sergeant Eu- gene Harris. Both posts offer varied duty training, Harris said. The enlist- ment options that the pair jresent are not limited to their respective duties. Strait and Schwendinger will be at the recruiting station at 2712 First avenue NE. Telephone number is 365-8601. Kenneth I. Schwendinger, 19, Monticelio, top, and Ter- ry Strait, 20, of 1600 Ellis boulevard NW, have been assigned to Cedar Rapids for 60 days to recruit. Murder Suspect Gets 5 Years on Another Count TOLEDO Charles Andrew Engel, 18, Gladbrook, charged vith the murder of his wife Carol Faye, Nov. 23 at the cou- ples' home in Gladbrook, was sentenced Tuesday in Marshall ounty district court to five ('ears in the men's reformatory it Anamosa on another charge. 3ngel withdrew a previous lea of innocent and pled guilty o assault with intent to escape, udge Ed J. Kelley in Marshall ounty district court reeom- that Engel be taken to IB Oakdale Facility for psychi- .Iric treatment. The charge in Marshall ounty was in connection with n attempt to escape from the Marshall county jail in company ith another prisoner, Robert E. Thomas, 28, Jan. 5, when they ssaulted a jailer. The escape ras thwarted when the sheriff's on heard the disturbance, 'homas also was sentenced to ive years in the men's reforma- ory with a recommendation for sychiatric help. Engel has been in the Mar- jail in lieu of since he was lall county bond aarged with the murder of his ills Nov. 23. She died of a gunshot wound. He has pled in- ocent to the murder charge nd Feb. 25 had been set for his ury trial. 30 YEARS AGO U.S. ma- ines landed on the north coast f New Britain, less than 170 rules from the Japanese strong- iold at Rabaul. Federal Grant to Joint County for Buying Materials The Joint County school sys- tem has received a fed- eral grant for purchase ol books, films, and non-print ma- terials to be used by students in a seven-county area. The funds, for fiscal year 1974, were allotted under Title II of the elementary and second- ary education act. Dr. Cliff Ehlinger, associate director of media and school services division for Joint County, said is allocated Eor purchase of 16 millimeter films; such as loops, strips, records, kits, models, and art prints. Materials, selected through a preview committee and on the recommendations made by :eachers, are available for :ember. The materials will be used by schools in Benton, Cedar, Iowa, Johnson, Linn, Washington and Jones counties. Caution Urged in Correspondence School Contracts With the approach of spring come various types of corre s p o n d e e e schools offering I home study courses, John Stock, chairman of the Chamber of I Commerce business consumer bureau, reported. The bureau has received in- formation many local residents are being contacted by corre- spondence schools, he said. Contracts should be carefully read and understood before being signed, Stock warned. A signed application usually becomes a contract when the school accepts it and payments required are generally binding. Even though a person may discontinue the course, the con- traded payments generally have to be paid. Most correspondence schools don't permit cancellation or have a cancellation fee, he re- ported. The written contract or appli- cation also supersedes any oral promises or information sup- plied by the salesman, he said, adding anyone with questions about a school can contact: The National Home Study Council, 1601 Eighteenth street NW, Washington, D.C. 20009, tho U.S. Office of Education, Washington, D.C. 20202. for books, and for non-print .materials expected to be use next Sep- Alan Shepard, Space Pioneer, Will Retire HOUSTON (UPI) Space pi- oneer Alan Shepard plans to re- ire from the space agency and ;he navy in June after 30 years in the armed forces. Shepard has been chief of the light operations astronaut of- 'ice since making the Apollo 14 light in 1971. He made Ameri- ca's first space journey on May 5, 1961. Remember Last Summer? f abgrass took over your Lawn Don't let it happen this year... Graeralfeld Pre-Emergence Crabicide Crabieids With Fertilizer Covert Sq. Ft. Greenfield Show Tell Spreader J Reg. SAVE When you buy Fertilizer or Crabgrass Killer Spreader together Onion Sots o Sood Potatoes Make An Appointment for LANDSCAPING PLANNING Now 5008 CENTER PT.RD.N.E. 393-5565 landscape Contractors Fayette School Chief Resigns KAYETTE Fayetto Com- munity School Supl. Mike Mit- chell has resigned to become su- perintendent at Janesvillo Con- solidulcd school district. .Mitchell came to Fayette in 1971. The resignation has not been acted upon by the Fayette school board. Waueoma Man Arrested in Gun Incident WAUCOMA Fayelte county authorities Thursday arrested Billy Joe Dean, 21, on charges of pointing a gun at another per- son. Authorities said he and his wife, Diane, had a quarrel in their Waueoma home. Dean grabbed a pistol and took off. ilis wife's father, Virgil Bush- man, 67, tried to stop Dean as ic drove his car out of the driveway. Bushman was knocked to the ground. He was taken to the West Union hospital where he underwent surgery. He is in jood condition. The Iowa highway patrol ar- .-esled Dean near New Hamp- on. Dean was also charged with -eckless driving. Dean was :akcn to Iowa Mental Health In- stitute at Independence for eval- uation. "...Another thing...What kind of vegetables do you t Sylvania MASHINES that won't run out of gas Sylvania 95% solid state portable color model CC1154 with Color Bright picture tube and Perma-Lock11' color tuning system for great pre-set color. GTE 359 95 with trade Come in and pick up a great Buy. NOW, Where? AT VALENTA'S TV and RADIO ENTERTAINMENT CENTER. Open Nights by Appointment Phone 362-5179 Plenty of Free Parking for you. Honest our innrlt of rf jmin 1734 B Ave. NW Jl JV I U I 0   

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