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Cedar Rapids Gazette: Friday, March 8, 1974 - Page 3

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   Cedar Rapids Gazette (Newspaper) - March 8, 1974, Cedar Rapids, Iowa                                 2 The Odar Rapids Gazette: Fri., Mar. 8, 1974 posing the collective bargaining! Union Is fjkaVPd bv  'hill.     1     *    *  Supt. James G  Bargaining Battle "Just Begun," Legislator Says  I Continued from Page I.)  the prolonged debate requires binding final offer arbitration as a last resort measure of settling deadlocks in contract negotiations.  Rep. Frank Crabb (R-Denison) predicted the bill with its compulsory arbitration feature “will cost the public $100 million over the next few years.”  Compusory collective b a r-  Dunton, bidden, Ewing, Fei-guson, Fischer, Fisher, Frce-man, Fullerton, Grassley, Hansen, Holden. Husak, Hutchins, Kook e, Kreamer, Ix>gue, McElroy, Mendenhall, Menke. Middlewart, Millen, R. G. Miller, PeJlett. Peterson, Roorda, Sehroeder, Stephens, Stromer Strothman, Tofte, Weldon, West, Wyckoff.  Absent or not voting: De Jong.  Rayne of the College Community school district, told The Gazette, “I guess now that ifs passed, we'll have to work with it. That’s the legislative process,  I guess."  He forecast increased budget expenditures for salaries be cause of passage of the bill.  The College Community school board went on record Feb. 12 as opposing passage of the collective bargaining bill.  East Iowans'  gaining and mandatory arbitration are the provisions that VJcs W c Vnr\/ rob elected officials of their    J  traditional powers, said Rep. 1O/7 Borgdl HI HQ  Rotary Awards Scholarship to Coe Sophomore  Julia A. Middleton, Coe sophomore from Cedar Rapids has  Richard Weldon (R-Iowa  been named winner of the Ce-  Falls).    i Reactions to passage of the j dar pa P| d f Rotary clubs anile    charged that    lobbyists    collective bargaining bill Thurs-     nual     scholarship    for foreign  for    the    Iowa State Education    .day varied from pleasure on the     slad r v '    ......    .    ,  I side of teachers in the Cedar  Mlss M, ddleton plans to Rapids area to resignment on  s P en( l her junior year of college  I the side of administrators.  Ken Pfile, president-elect of I the Cedar Rapids Education Assn., told The Gazette, “I think jit's great. There were a lot of amendments, but nothing that I changes the senate version of !the bill substantially.”  Assn. and labor groups, which he called “a ruthless special interest minority,” had pushed through “a bill that is unwanted and is not in the best interests of the majority of the people of Iowa.”  Rep. Lester Menke (R-Caluniet) spoke out against what he called the “flannelmouthed Pied Pipers who sing their sweet songs that are supposed to lead the rats of the school board to the river for drowning.  “You’ve been led down the primrose path by some people who said this is good for education,” Menke said. “It isn’t.”  Rep. Robert Kreamer (R-Des Moines) branded the bill a “sell-out of education” because it contemplates formation of teacher unions instead of letting teachers negotiate on such issues as curriculum, textbooks and class size as he said they want to do.  “This battle which has taken 12 days to fight has just begun, because I intend to come back here and be the lead sponsor on repeal of this bill,” Kreamer said.  “Vote Out of Fear”  Rep. James West (R-State Center) said he was convinced most of the backers were voting for the bill not because they favor it, “but because of fear—fear that has been instilled in them by the ISEA and labor lobbyists.”  But Rep. Tom Higgins (D-Davenport ) said nothing could be further from the truth than contentions of some opponents that the bill will breed strikes, particularly by teachers.  “There is a healthy dose of preventive medicine against strikes in this bill,” Higgins said.  He also termed “ludicrous hallucinations” contentions that lobbyists were responsible for the measure. He said lobbyists for the Iowa Farm Bureau, Iowa Taxpayers Assn. and other groups were as active against the measure as the ISEA and labor groups were for it.  ♦ * *  The Vote DES MOINES (AP)- Here is how the Iowa house voted Thursday bn the bill to allow public employes to bargain collectively on wages and working conditions, passed 56-43:  Voting for: Avenson, Bittie, Brinck, Brunow, Butler, Byer-ly, Caffrey, Carr, John Clark, Joseph Clark. Cochran, Connors, Crawford, Cusack, Doyle, Drake, Egenes, Griffee, Fitzgerald, Hargrave, Harper, Harvey, Hennessey, Higgins, Hill. Horn. Howell, Jessee, Jordan, Junker, Kiser, Krause, Lippold, Lipsky, McCormick, Mennenga, A. Miller, K. Miller, Monroe. New-hard. Nielsen, Norland, Nor-pel, Oakley, O’Halloran, Patched, Poncy, Rapp, Readier, Rinas, Small, Stanley, Var-ley, Wells, Woods, Wulff Voting against:    Anderson,  Bennett, Bortell, Branstad, Brockett, Crabb, Daggett, Danker, Den Herder, Dunlap,  studying at either the Royal Academy of Music in London or  Three significant changes he cited were amendments limiting the scope of items to be negotiated, the addition of fact-finding steps in the impasse procedure, and the requirement that an organization must receive 50 percent of the potential votes in order to be elected bargaining agent, rather than 50 percent of the votes actually cast.  Julia A. Middleton  New England college’s campus at Arundel, Sussex, England.  She is the daughter of Mrs. John Middleton, 213 Crandall drive NE, Cedar Rapids. A 1971 graduate of Linn-Mar high school, she studied at the University of Iowa and Iowa State before transferring to Coe in  Iowa City Employes  IOWA CITY - The city cm-ployes of Iowa City, with the exception of secretaries, firemen and police, will be represented by Ureal 183 of the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employes following a vote of the employes Thursday.  The vote was 96 yes and 43 no, giving the union a 6 percent majority more than needed for representation.  City Personnel Director Nicholas Smoed said it. was an extremely large turnout with only seven of the 178 employes eligible failing to vote.  “Basically, I’m very pleased I don’t think it’s going to change I January,1973. j things that much in Cedar Miss ‘ Middleton is a music Rapids. It will make the process major. She plays percussion en-ja little more formal.’    semble in the Coe band and  Pfile said he was optimistic piano with the Coe chamber or-| his organization, with about 1.000 chestra and with the Cedar members, will be elected bar- Rapids Symphony orchestra, gaining agent for the 1,300 Abbott Lipsky, chairman of teachers iii the Cedar Rapids,the Rotary club’s scholarship Community school district. committee, said the recipient Norman Hanson, president of each year is chosen from the Cedar Rapids Federation of among applicants who live in Teachers, called the passage “a Linn county and are students victory for organized labor, not at either Coe or Mt. Mercy who just teachers, but for all public are seeking to study abroad in  their third year of college. Miss Middleton is a member  employe groups.  “No More Begging"  “Cedar Rapids teachers will elect a bargaining agent and the board will have to negotiate as equals. The teachers won’t have to beg anymore.”  Hanson said CRFT has “an excellent chance of being elected by the teachers as the bargaining agent.”  Norman Lipsky, president of the Cedar Rapids Community school board, was not available, for comment Friday, but board; member Barbara Bjornson said,  of Chi Omega social sorority and Mu Phi Epsilon, honorary music sorority for women.  Kirkwood Plans Workshop Sought By Iowa Assn.  A workshop on grounds maintenance methods will be held next Friday at Kirkwood Com-  Swim Program Registration at YMCA Saturday  Staff members will be on hand from 9 a.rn to 3 p.m. Saturday at the Central YMCA to assist both old and new youth members with the completion of spring program registration.  The spring programs, open to both boys and girls between the ages of 6 and 12, will get under way next week.  Included in the spring class listing are instructional and recreational gym and swim sessions as well as new classes in golf, tennis and track.  Interested youngsters or parents are invited to drop in at the Central Y Saturday or to contact either Fred Steeker or Larry Lutz at 366-6421.  ♦ * *  One special class, a junior lifesaving course limited to swimmers between the ages of ll and 14, will begin Saturday from 10:30 a m. to noon.  Participants must be able to pass a quarter-mile swimming endurance test for the course, which will lead to certification by the Red Cross.  The 12-week class will be held weekly on Saturday mornings through the end of May. Cost is $4 for Central Y members and $10 for non members.  Guttenberg Men Plead Innocent  ELKADER - Four Guttenberg  men pled innocent in Clayton district court Thursday to charges of resisting execution of  Army Assigns Two Recruiters To C. R. Posts  Two soldiers from the Cedar Rapids area have been assigned here for 60 days as recruiters.  The pair will attempt to enlist local residents for duty at their respective posts.  Pfc. Terry Strait, 20, of IBM Ellis boulevard NVV, has been authorized to enlist recruits for duty at Fort Riley, Kan.  Strait, a military policeman, is a 1972 graduate of Kennedy high school.  Pfc. Kenneth I. Schwendinger,  19. Monticello, has been authorized to enlist recruits for duty at Fort (’arson, Colo.  Schwendinger, a 1973 graduate of Monticello high school, is an infantryman.  The army may extend their assignment in Cedar Rapids if it feels their stay is successful, according to Staff Sergeant Eugene Harris.  Both posts offer varied duty training. Harris said. The enlist-ment options that tho pair  Kenneth  , S-hwondinger, present are not limited to their    . .     A . „    ,    ■     T   respective duties.    ”•    *°P-  a " d T «[-  Strait and Schwendinger will  r y Strait. 20, of 1600 Ellis be at the recruiting station at boulevard NW, have been 2712 First avenue NE. Telephone assigned to Cedar Rapids number is 365-8601.     for 6Q day$ fo recruit   Murder Suspect \Z ,    77  r* j. r v    Federal    errant to  teets 5 Years on ...  n  ,  x  a ii    I    Joint County tor  Another Count  D  .  KA  ,  7  . ,  Duyinq Materia s  TOLEDO - Charles Andrew ,    •    ^  Engel, 18, Gladbrook, charged The Joint County school sys-with the murder of his wife, tem has received a $123,887 led-Carol Faye, Nov. 23 at the cou- eral grant for purchase of pies’ home in Gladbrook, was books, films, and non-print ma-sentenced Tuesday in Marshall terials to be used by students in county district court to five a seven-county area. years in the mens reformatory The funds, for fiscal year  Caution Urged in Fayette School  Correspondence 0||j e f Resigns  School Contracts  FAYETTE Fayette Community School Supt. Mike Mitchell has resigned to become su-  come various types of «...    ”,    con-  schools offci log j ol i da j c( |  schoo | district.  Mitchell came to Fayette in 1971. The resignation has no! been acted upon by the Fayette school board.  Waucoma Man Arrested in Gun Incident  With the approach of spring correspond e n c e  home study courses, John Stock, chairman of the Chamber of Commerce business consumer bureau, reported The bureau has received information many local residents are being contacted by correspondence schools, he said.  Contracts should lie carefully read and understood before    WAUCOMA - Fayette county  being signed. Stock warned    authorities    Thursday arrested  A signed application usually Billy Joe Dean, 21, on charges becomes a contract when the of pointing a gun at another per-school accepts it and payments son.  required are generally binding. Authorities said he and his Even though a person may wife, Diane, had a quarrel in discontinue the course, the con- their Waucoma home. Uean t r a c t e (I payments generally grabbed a pistol and took off. have to be paid.    wifes    father, Virgil Bush-  Most. correspondence schools [nan. 67, tiled to  S,0 P ■ don’t permit cancellation or he drove his cai (It,  have a cancellation fee, he re- driveway.   pnrtec j    Bushman    was knocked to the  The written contract or appli-iground. He was taken to the cation also supersedes any oral West Union hospital where he promises or information sup- underwent surgery. He is in plied by the salesman, he said, good condition, adding anyone with questions The Iowa highway patrol ar-about a school can contact:    rested Dean near New Hamp-  The National Home Study ton. Dean was also charged with Council. 1601 Eighteenth street reckless driving. Dean was NW, Washington, D C. 20009. o;r taken to Iowa Mental Health In-tho U.S. Office of Education, I stitute at Independence for eval-Washington, D C. 20202.    tuation.  at Anamosa on another charge. Engel withdrew a previous plea of innocent and pled guilty  1974, were allotted under Title ll of the elementary and secondary education act.  Dr. Cliff Ehlinger, associate director of media and school  to assault with intent to escape.  Judge Ed J. Kelley in Marshall county district court recom-s e r v i c e s division for Joint mended that Engel be taken to j County, said $81,721 is allocated the Oakdale Facility for psychi- for purchase of 16 millimeter atric treatment.    films: $37,166 for books, and)  The charge in Marshall $5,000 for non-print materials county was in connection with such as loops, strips, records,) an attempt to escape from the kits, models, and art prints. Marshall county jail in company Materials, selected through a with another prisoner. Robert E. preview committee and on the Thomas, 28, Jan. 5, when they!recommendations made by assaulted a jailer. The escape teachers, are expected to be  was    thwarted    when the sheriff’s available    for use    next    Sep-  progress in    connection with    an     son     heard    the disturbance.Member,  incident last Dec.    23    in Cutten-    Thomas also    was sentenced to 1  The materials will    be used by  five    years in the men’s reforma- schools in    Benton, Cedar,    Iowa,  bree on bond are Martin tory with a recommendation for Johnson, Linn, Washington and Behrend, 21, Larkin Rutledge, psychiatric help 26. Michael Kann, 23, and Dan- Engel has been in the Mar-iel Schmidt, 22. No trial date shall county jail in lieu of has been set.    $50,000 bond since he was  The four, indicted by a grand charged with the murder of his jury, were charged with inter- wife Nov. 23. She died of a  Jones counties.  "...Another thing...What kind of vegetables do you serve?!" ,  Alan Shepard, Space Pioneer, Will Retire  HOUSTON (UPI) — Space pi-1  fering with Guttenberg police gunshot wound. He has pled in-    oneer Alan Shepard plans to reofficers trying to make    other ar-docent to the murder charge    tire from the space agency and:  The workshop, planned by the|rests.     an d    Feb. 25 had been set for his the navy in June after 30 years!  “We were expecting something     a *     ,de     ~    T]    'jury    trial.    in the armed forces.  would pass. I hope we can get l owa Par * s and  Recreation    J^w«rDie*      Shepard    has    been    chief    of    the  along with this     Assn ’’     1S for  P ersons  already: MOSCOW (AP) - Pyotr An- 30 YEARS AGO - U.S. ma- flight operations astronaut of-  employed in grounds mainte-okhin, 77, a pioneering Soviet rines landed on the north coast fice since making the Apollo 14 nance work.    brain specialist and a    celebrat-jof New Britain, less than 170    flight in 1971. He made Ameri-j  Four    sessions are planned, j cd physiologist, died    Wednes-jmiles from the Japanese strong- 1     ca’s first space journey on May;  | Topics will be concrete con-day.    I    hold    at Rabaul.    5, 1961.  jstruction methods, purchase of  “I don’t anticipate Cedar Rapids having many problems. There is an excellent relationship now (with the teachers) and I hope it can he preserved.”  Sylvania  safety equipment, public rcla-  - nu .    .    I lions, and chemicals for use in  j j #??• u j C ’r.  su ^ er . m ‘ vegetation control, tendon! of Kirkwood Community.  !le g lslration fec  „ m  ^  $5   college, sa,d be did not know' Registration will be conducted how much effect passage of the  at 830 a m jn  , he ncw horticu ,J  collective bargaining bill will  ture  operations center on the' have on Kirkwood    Kirkwood campus. The program  Now They Have It    will end at 5 p.m.  “It’s part of our way of life. I Advance registration is urged This is the last of the people by telephoning 398-5441 in Cedar who did not have the right to Rapids. Those who advance reg-) collective bargaining and now ister by telephone will not be they have it.”    required to make payment of  The Kirkwood board of direc-. the fee until the day of the tors Jan. 28 went on record op- workshop.  Now! The Cedar Rapids  coin club  ANNUAL COIN SHOW  SAT.-SUN., MARCH 9,10...IT’S FREE!  Sat. 8-9 . . . Sun. 8-5 . . . See you alif I.B.E.W. HALL—Wiley Blvd.—off Hiway 30 West  • Food Served • Buy, Sell, Trode  N’SpareSpe  single vision  Offer Extended to March 30, 1974  Remember Last Summer? ^Crabgrass took over your Lawn Don’t let it happen this year...  Apply Greenfield  Pre-Emergence  Crabicide  Crabicide  With Fertilizer  Covers 5,000 Sq. Ft.  $  Covers 5,000 Sq. Ft.  $  6 ll  MACHINES  17  iagonai ■or tab!  Greenfield  Show & Tell  Spreader  Reg. $18.95  SAVE $6.00  md it rh  10WE8I PRICE EVER I *12“  The 52 week vacation that won’t run out of gas  S Sylvania 95'; solid state portable color model CCI 154 with Color Bright 100 ;M  picture tube and Perma-Lock color tuning .system for great  predict color.    TM-Tradamark    GTI Sylvania Incorporated.  Buy 1 Pair at Reg.Price • Spare Pair  When you buy Fertilizer or Crabgrass Killer & Spreader together  • Onion Sots  • Seed Potatoos  Make An Appointment for LANDSCAPING PLANNING Now  DOWNTOWN CEDAR RAPIDS  106 1ST STREET S.E.  (it EN Att DAY MONDAY I DRU ! A f URDA <  5008 CENTER PT.RD.N.E. i  393-5565  Landscape Contractors  with trod*  Only $3 5 g 95  Come in and pick up a great Buy. NOW. Where? AT VALENTA’S TV and RADIO ENTERTAINMENT CENTER.  * Open Nights by Appointment  Phone 362-5179  * Plenty of Free Parking for you.  It orient Sorrier...Fair /Vim.,, 11’* our murk of /iro^rraa/  rnms  ADI0  I 734 B Ave. NW   

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