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Cedar Rapids Gazette Newspaper Archive: March 8, 1974 - Page 10

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Publication: Cedar Rapids Gazette

Location: Cedar Rapids, Iowa

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   Cedar Rapids Gazette (Newspaper) - March 8, 1974, Cedar Rapids, Iowa                                Tile C'edar Kapids Gazette: Fri., Star. 8, 1974 Society for Women Features Fashion Show Photo by John Mclvor Modeling mother-daughter outfits at the Welcome Wagon fashion show Thursday at the Montrose hotel are Mrs. John Kerns, 2524 Blue Ridge drive NE, and her daughter, Linda, who is five years old. The show, ar- ranged by members of Welcome Wagon, also featured hats made by Ruth Cochran, a member. Piano Students To Give Recitals Students of Mrs. Dennis F. Goettel will be presented in re- cital Friday (March 8) evening at at the YWCA. Perform- ing will be Andy, Judy and Allison Mclntosh; Cori, Nancy and June Schirmer, John Quade, Amy Wellso, Marjorie Teachout, Tami and Todd Wil- liams, Peter Andersen, NJanell Threet, Jackie and Laurie Davis, Misty Cheney, Mark, Kathy and Rob Roberts, Conrad Grant, Lisa Olson and Kim Tonn. Performing in two recitals Sunday at the YWCA will be piano students of Mrs. John E. Charlson. Participating at 2 will be Tom Listebarger, Gayle and Jill Olson, Karen Havlik, Kim and Jeri Fatka, Susie Pfost, Barbara Althoff, Kathy Bey, Lynda Bennett, Karie and Keel Clemmens, Carol and Lisa Grondahl, Lisa Frazee, Ellen England, Patricia Simon, Ther- esa Widmer, Cheryl and Jim Shanklin, Lisa Hoopes and Kris- ta Peterson. Appearing at will be Julie Erickson, Jill Roesch, Julie Hupp, Lisa and Gwen Sawyer, Carol Bolton, Jolene S c h u- macher, Amy Salmon, Karen Stucker, Angela Johnson. Kelly Walker, Ann Nemec, Juiic Da- vidson, David Howell, DeeAnn Davidson, Suzanne Muret, Kay Seery, Kellie Grove, Davic Johnston, Karen Jacobson, Kelly O'Brien, Francine Gray and Sarah Sears. Bridge Beginner's Duplicate Winners in a Mitchell move- ment game played Thursday at Noelridge Park Christian church were: North-south Mrs. Richard Siewert and Charles Fitzgerald, first, and Mrs. Mary Earley and Mrs. R.W. Vater, second; east-west Mrs. Leo Klinger and Mrs. O.J. Elsenbast, first, and Mrs. Robert Dreckman and Mrs. Robert Grodt, second. The next scheduled game will be played Thursday at at the church. West Side Winners in a Howell move- ment game played Thursday evening at Welly-Way were: Mrs. Harrington and Rich- ard Golembiewski, first, and Mrs. J.D. Schultz and Mrs. James Slaman tied for second place with Mrs. W.E. Eyman and Mrs. K.E. Henrikson. The next game will be played Sun- day at at Welty-Way. The Tough One Buster Brown's tough playing boy's shoe. Tough Leathers wear long. Rubber soles grip hard. Have your boy try them. We'll make sure they fit right. Sizei nVi-3 '15M Join Our Buitar Drown Shoe Club Buy 11 and Rscolvo the 12th Pair Freel Buster Brown. Men Do Work In Russia on Women's Day MOSCOW (UPI) Soviet women taxied jets to a halt, parked garbage trucks and stepped out of snowplows Fri- day to sit back for a change and be waited on by their men. It's the communist world's In- IGives Hancher I By Lcs Zachcis Rudolf Serkin.. (he Bohemiai born pianist, international! ranked as one of the greatest o this century, appeared in forma recital Thursday night t Handier auditorium in low City. Serkin, age 71, displaye the digital dexterity of a man i his twenties. The repertoire of the eve- ning was devoted to the three Bs, Bach, Brahms and Beeth- oven, with a bit of Schubert tossed in for good measure. Serkin's opening Bach, the "Italian Concerto in F major" was played in the majestic, metronomic style that this writer feels is imperative with accurately interpreted Bach. The three-four andante was idyllic in nature, while the final presto was resolute and determined in attitude. The Schubert "Fantasie in C popularly dubbed as "The Wanderer" was typical period piano festoonery with its declamatory opening statement: and eventually resolving into series of cascading descending arpeggios to lavishly embellish the simple theme. The Brahms pieces for piano, opus 119, the composer's farewell to the in- strument, composition-wise, of- fered Serkin, a great opportunity to wax poetic. I felt he was truly eloquent on the exotic songlike melody that makes up the second movement in E major. The third movement, an inter- mezzo in C major in meter, lived up to its popular but non- 11 rogrammed nickname of The final section, abeled a rhapsody, is an almost march-like development with berkin hammering out a power- 'ul beat. The jumbo work of the eve- ning was the Beethoven "Waldstein" C major sonata. The artist launched the left hand rhythmic pattern in a crisp and precise manner and had the allegro moving ahead at a pace that had: this writer wondering what all the rush was about. By the time Serkin reached the exquisite second- ary theme of the first move- ment, there was no time to caress the charming G sharp to C sharp descending melodic line. Technically speaking, he was a peerless performer on the Miss World 'Dismissed In London By Julie Flint LONDON Marjorie Wallace, Hie 20-year-old Indi- anapolis mode! who last No- vember became the first American to win the Miss World title, was fired by the contest's British organizers Thursday. Her dismissal was unprece- dented in the 22-year history of the competition. The sponsors of the annual beauty extravaganza, Mecca, Ltd., said Miss Wallace had failed to fulfill the basic re- quirements of the title good relations with the media, dis- cipline and a "first-class pub- lic image." Relationships The brief reign of the blond beauty, steady girlfriend of millionaire racing driver Peter Revson, was marred by controversy over her rela- tionships with a number of British pop personalities. These included former soccer star George Best whom she accused of stealing worth of furs and property from her London apartment. She is to appear in court March 27 when Best is ar- raigned. But Mecca chief Eric Mor- ley said the parting had been "friendly." "Marjorie felt it was he said. "I expect her to re- turn home to America now." "Wrong Impression" The company's statement said adverse publicity sur- rounding Miss AVallace risked demeaning the contest and giving "the wrong impression abroad." It said reporters and photo- graphers had been "constant- ly frustrated in their attempts to secure interviews at rea- sonable times and at reason- able notice." :A titleholder once elected, has the option of returning to ler home and comparative obscurity or of accepting the disciplines and conditions at- Telephoto Miss World, 20-year-old Marjorie Wallace of Indianapolis, presented a picture of hap- piness Wednesday but a day later she was stripped of the beauty crown she won in London last November. It was the -first time in the 22 year history of the contest that a titleholder has been dismissed. She was the first American girl to win the Miss World con- test. tached to a year of the statement said. Departure "If-she accepts the latter, it is important-that she not only maintains a first-class public image but accepts all engage- m e n t s arranged by her agents, and that she allows no personal involvement from family or friends to interfere with her duties, or to speak on her behalf." Miss Wallace left England suddenly last week to visit Revson in Fort Lauderdalc, Fla. Her .departure followed a row with Best over the alleged theft of a fur coat and other valuables from her London apartment, and with Mecca over a screen kiss in a televi- sion spectacular she filmed with singer Tom Jones. During her absence in Flori- da Revson reportedly told Mecca she wanted to quit, eight months before the end of her reign. But on arrival back in Lon- don Wednesday she said, "I'm not relinquishing my title. I have enjoyed my work and plan to finish the year." She also denied she was en- gaged to Revson, a violation of Mecca rules that, Miss World remain single for the duration of her reign. ternational Women's day, the piano and he accepted the ap- Russian version of Valentine's plause of his audience with day and Mother's day rolled into one. During the legal holiday, one of the year's biggest in the Sovi- et Union, women traditionally get a break from working at home as well as in offices and factories across the nation. The men, from the Kremlin's lead- ers to the humblest peasants, over housework for the day. It's a nice sentiment, but it doesn't always work out in prac- tice. "My Yuri will try, but that only means it will take me most of Saturday to clean up the one woman office worker said. Men packed the capital's stores all week buying roses from Soviet Georgia at apiece, Krasnaya Moskva co- logne for a bottle and negli- gees for more than each. Weight comes off at about the same rate as it goes on. Any good diet takes time and a bal- anced diet. charming dignity. President Nixon Entertains with Pearl WASHINGTON (UPI) With President Nixon supply- ing the piano accompaniment, it was sing-along-with-Pearl Bailey- Thursday night at a White House dinner and .the act drew a roar of approval from 115 guests, including 41 governors and their wives. Miss Bailey, wearing a pink and.gold caftan, held the audi- ence spellbound for nearly an hour and at the close drew shouts of "bravo" and a kiss from California Gov. Ronald Reagan. Then she coaxed the Pres- ident to the piano from his front row seat, saying "Any- thing you can play, I know." He launched, into "Home on the Miss Bailey gri- maced, but started to sing. Then she stopped. "Mr. President, I want to sing a she said. "I don't want to ride a horse." The audience roared, and Nixon "My Wild Irish When the duo finished that, he followed with "God Bless America" and the whole group .joined in. "I haven't enjoyed an eve- ning so much in said Vice-president Gerald R. Ford. "I laughed so much I cried." For. her performance Miss Bailey, who has done many tours abroad in cultural ex- changes, was promised a trip to Egypt by Nixon as an ''am- bassador of love" a trip she earlier had said she would like to make. Before the entertainment Nixon addressed the gover- nors, here for their annual midwinter conference, but his 20-minute speech was closed to reporters. It reportedly dealt with pros'pects for foreign relations in the com- ing months. New York City Air, Cleaner in Crisis NEW YORK (UPI) The! energy crisis has helped make! the air in New York City! cleaner. Robert A. Low, the slate's en-! vironmental protection adminis- trator, said Thursday carbon monoxide levels in city air dropped by as much as 20 per- cent during the last three months because of reduced au- tomobile emissions during the gasoline shortage. Two Locations... TWICE AS NICE! DOWNTOWN 108 ie tower TOWN COUNTRY Shopping Center vlo Decor CEDAR RAPIDS New Shipment! COFFEE COATS just received a new as- sortment of our. popular coffee coal in colorful print patterns. Snap front closing with two deep pockets. Easy care fabrics in sizes Small, Medium and Large. Robm 2nd Floor Cooking tips to help you save money and conserve energy.. Allow larger cuts of meat, such as thick steaks and roasts, to come to room temperature before cooking. Double recipes and store or freeze extras whenever possible. Match the flame size to the pan size. A flame licking up the side of a pan wastes energy. Cover pots and pans. It will shorten cooking time and you won't need as high a heat setting. If you'll be serving in less than 30 minutes, hold food at a very low temperature instead of reheating. Never leave surface units or oven on when not in use. Plan meals so more than one dish can be cooked in the oven at one time You II conserve both energy and vitamins by placina vegetables in the oven in a lacing covered casserole along with other dishen v rt IS that cook in loss Don't peek! Keep the oven door closed for fast, economical baking. For additional ideas on how to connow energy and save money visit any Iowa-Illinois office and ask for your copy of the pamphlet "A Consum- er's Guide To Efficient Enomy Use In The Home." Energy is precious use it wisely!   

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