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Cedar Rapids Gazette: Tuesday, March 5, 1974 - Page 5

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   Cedar Rapids Gazette (Newspaper) - March 5, 1974, Cedar Rapids, Iowa                                Rain will fall in the Pacific northwest Tuesday night, while snow activity is expected over the northern Rockies and most of the Dakotas. Showers are expected over the mid Atlantic states. Clear to partly cloudy elsewhere. Record--- The Weather High temperatures Monday, low tern pera ures overnight and Indies of prcci pllalion: Anchorage 17-9 L. Anaeles .4747 Atlanta ...7S5i Miami 73 68 Bismarck Minneapolis 29 Chlcaso ....4IM.M N.Orleans .8245 Denver 5026 New York ..7063 Duluth .3322.18 Phoenix Hon ..8571 Scalllo 7767 Washington Extended Forecast Partly cloudy Thursday. Chance o rain or snow over the southwes Friday and over the state Satur- day. Highs in the upper 20s t ts. Each pellet has Ihe energy I ban Atlanta woman who is of about one and with her husband A member of St. John's Epis- copal church, she also was a Co- lonial Dame and a member of I'EO. half tons of coal. Each fuel connection with the abduction of bundle costs Original Plan Plans for the nuclear plant were announced in February, (Continued from Page 1.) heating oil production. This was at the expense of gasoline out- put, he said. In other developments: The White House- said Tues- day that President Nixon will send his veto message on t h e emergency energy bill to congress Wednesday. The European Common Mar- ket ministers told Kissinger Monday that they will begin seeking cooperation with the Arabs in a broad range of glo- bal concern's including energy, [inance and agriculture. West German Foreign Minister Walter Schccl denied the effort was aimed solely at assuring en6ugh oil from the Arabs, call- ng the proposal "a long term effort aimed at sectors of common interest." The Nixon administration joined with natural gas com- iany executives Monday in urg- ng congress to pass legislation ending the 7.6 cents per gallon July on methanol, commonly mown as wood alcohol, if it is mpnrlcd for fuel use. Mrs. Mary Ann Seek Fee, 63, of 3035 Twelfth avenue .SE, widow of James Fee, died Monday while visiting her sister, Mrs Robert Calkins, in Freeport, 111. Born March 8, 1910, in Minot, N.D., she had spent most of her life in Cedar Rapids. She was a former employe of the Linn county treasurer's office anc was house mother of Sigma Ch fraternity at Iowa City before retiring in 1968. Surviving in addition to Mrs Calkins are three sons, James Freeman, Denver, Colo., Ken neth Fee, Cedar Rapids, and Dr. Everett Fee, Winnipeg, Can ada; two daughters, Burdette Dlouby, California, and Mrs Dennis Moss, Anamosa; grand children; another sister, Char 1 o 11 e Schifner of Spokane Wash., two brothers, Charle: Seek, Los Angeles, Calif., am Donavon Seek, Minneapolis. Mrs: Fee willed her body li the University school of rnedi cine, Iowa City. Memorial ser vice: by the Rev. Edmund J Becker, Thursday at 1 p.m. a the Teahen chapel. Friends may, if they wish, do nate to the heart fund. Mrs. Russeli Linnell Martha Mela Linnell, 66, former Cedar Rapids resident, died Feb. 24 in Buena Park, She was the widow ol Russell Linnell. She had lived in California 35 years and in Buena Park 11 years. She was in the restaurant business in Santa Monica for many years. She was a -life member and charter member of Bainbridge post American Legion auxiliary and held offices of vice- president and secretary in Min- neapolis. Survivors include four brothers, George Hoover of Banning, Calif.; John, Harry and Clarence Hoover, all of Cedar Rapids; and three sisters, Elsie Buswell, of Cedar Rapids; Helen Tiegen, of Buena Park and Ethel Berry, of Marengo. Services were Feb. 27 in Buena Park, with burial at Fort S n e 11 i n g National cemetery, Minneapolis, on March 1. 20 YEARS AGO of this year was Ilic warmest in Iowa since records were begun n Mrs. Jess Philips Addie J. Philips, 97, of 519 Fourth avenue SE, widow of Jess Philips, died Tuesday fol- lowing a long illness. Born Sept. 24, 1876, in Fnycltc county, slip had been a Cedar Rapids resident since 1958. She was a member of Bethel Pres- byterian church in West Union. Survivors include a daughter, Mrs. Harry Fritz, Cedar Rapids; a grandchild and a great-grandchild. Services are pending at Burn- liam-Wood funeral home in West Union. Burial: West Union cem- etery. Turner's cast was in (charge of local arrangements. Given up on that electric gui- lar? Place a Classified Ad and watch it sell! O loll somoono you caro with (lowers Florist and Gift Shop 364-B139 phono answorod 24 hours ovory day auivivitig iHc luu flrs. Thomas Horn, Austin, 1'cxas, and Mrs. Roger Jayne, 'acific Palisades, Calif.; a son, George Adams, C e d a r iapids; six grandchildren and! two great-grandchildren. Services: Pending at Turner chapel east. The family requests Ihat friends, if they wish, contribute lo a charity of Initial cost estimate was S107 million. The figure has wen revised upward several times, until now construction cost is estimated at million. There are other costs too. For instance, Arnold said that so far IE has spent just over million in training people to work in the plant. The technical staff has been in training for the last two a half years. Anna M. of the operating taff have received their AEC Anna M. Mitchell, 82, Ten of that number ly of 371G Second avenue achieved a qualification of died Monday in a Cedar reactor operator. lospital following a long addition to the plant tech- She had lived in Cedar and operating staff, IE has and Linn county all of her technical staff of Born near Cedar Rapids 20 engineers plus a quali- 17, 1891, she had made her assurance engineering group with a brother, James a nuclear fuels group. of the Second avenue GO and 70 persons address. Miss Mitchell was be employed in the plant member of Christ Church it is in commercial opera- ed Presbyterian and was member of Homemakers club, ''airview Ladies Aid society and Elizabeth Gordon When the plant is in operation There are no immediate a fourth of the fuel rods be replaced every year. Re- Services: Thursday at at Turner chapel west by the Rev. tabert Bouton of Christ church. Burial: Fairfax will necessitate a 30-day shutdown. During that time electricity will be generated rom conventional coal plants. Friends may call at The used fuel will spend three west. The family suggests that Mends may, if they wish, six months cooling off, will then be put into casks and :ribule to the memorial fund probably to a Genera] Christ Church United fuel processing plant in 111. used fuel will be chopped Harry W. and processed chemically to extract the remaining uranium Harry Wilson Martin, 94, decayed products. The ura- 538 Twenty-seventh street will be reused and the died Monday following a products will be storet site for 10 years, then trans- Born Oct. 16, 1879, in Cedar Rapids, he had been a to an AEC disposal site yet to be selected. resident of the city and was Amount 46 years an employe of. the waste products from a office, where he was of operation at the Pal( tendent of finance before will fill a one- or two-car retirement in plant officials say. He was a member of completion is very elos John's Episcopal church, the original time schedule an Hermon lodge, AF and That called- for.com for nearly 50 years, operation to begin ii Rapids Consistory and 1974. chapter, plant has come under fir Survivors include two sons John P., Cedar Rapids, environmental groups wh have questioned the safety o Robert A., St. Paul; a nuclear plant so clos grandchildren and seven great grandchildren. Services: Turner chapel a populated area and the gen eral effects such a plant wil have on the environment. at 3 p.m. Thursday by the Rev. Canon D. A. West Burial: Linwood. Friends may call at Turner east after from Page 1.) of justice and perjury asainst him Memorial Committee Press Secretary Borgenson, Tamar Meislcr Turner chapel east at p.m. Wednesday by the Ziegler said Tuesday hat St. Clair had been in touch Paul E. Traeumcr ot the house judiciary com- Episcopal church. counsel on a request ment: Chapel of Memories. Heilman, Harriett Services at a.m. Wednesday in eight days ago by the committee for White House doc- Patrick's Catholic church and tapes in connection ;hc Rev. Martin Laughlin. Burial: Linwood cemetery. Brady-Kuba funeral home is in charge of arrangements. McFarlane, Herbert M. its impeachment inquiry. Chairman Peter Rodino (D-N. J.) said Monday he thought he committee had waited long a.m. Wednesday in arid other members said el Memories by the Rev. Ernest W. Larson ol Trinity United Methodist church. would favor issuing a subpoena for the evidence if it is Cedar Memorial. forthcoming. jy Cedar Memorial Ciair's request for a meet- will probably head off de- Dostal, Joseph I''., jr. Services were held at a.m. Tuesday at Chapel ot for a subpoena at a cqm-nittee session Tuesday called by the Rt. Rev. Canon D. A. a briefing on the status of the ferski of St. John's Episcopal church. Cremation was with inurnment in Cedar Appeal Opposed morial mausoleum. Arrangements by the Cedar a related development, the funeral office asked the U. Palo court of appeals lo deny Wa-ergate conspirator E. Howard request for reversal of (Continued from Page conviction in the original 'nil-power operating brcakin case. from the AEC Feb. a brief filed Monday, the said that despite The 550-megawall claim that he was vic- station is owned 70 percent by government officials owa Electric, 20 percent of the misconduct he cited Central Iowa Power committed by anyone acl- of Marion and Creston and in any governmental, much percent by Corn Belt Power a law enforcement, capaci- operative of The plant was open short, while a fraud was morning lo area press on the judicial sys- sentatives to watch fuel the criminal process, and 'he sccurily Ihat each public in the Watergate went through made it clear Hunt was fully aware of as Arnold said, "The fish fraud during ils commission era is at an end. Public had the opportunity to o the plant is over." it, which he chose nol to persons have loured Ihe prosecutors said. For 6 1 years flowers for all John E. Olf d 3083rdAve. SE jWTBSy downtown I newspaper editor Reg Murphy. U.S. Magistrate J. Roger Thompson agreed at a prelimi- nary hearing Monday to reduce bond from to tor Betty Ruth Williams, 26. But ic refused to reduce the million bond he had set for her 33-year-old husband, William A. If. Williams. In arguing for dismissal of charges against Mrs. Wil- liams, her lawyer told the extortion. federal grand jury. Williams is charged with ex- tortion in the abduction of Murphy, editor of the Atlanta Constitution. Mrs. Williams is accused of concealing knowl- edge of the alleged extortion. The couple were arrested Feb. 23, only hours after Murphy was released unharmed following payment of a ransom by the newspaper's owners. He had been held cap- I live 49 hours. FBI agents said they discov- ered in cash at the Williams' home in suburban Mi- bum at the time of the arrests. Pleading for a lower bond for Williams, attorney Tyrus R. At- U. S. Grand Jury Convenes; Cases Not Specified A new federal grand jury began deliberating Tuesday contended "a million do! Cedar Rapids federal court onijar bond is just a refusal of "a very limited number ofl cases." U.S. Atty. Evan Hultman said he could report nothing about the grand jury's activities, ex- cept to say that "a very limited number of cases" are being considered, "not more than two or three." The grand jury is expected to return indictments Thursday, though those indictments will not be public until arrests are made. Jurors Listed ..The 23-person grand jury se- lected Tuesday includes: Sandra Carlson, Watkins; Mark Bradford Condon, 16li Thirtieth street NW; Patricia Ann Corum, Center Point; George P. Kelley, Bennett; Otto A. Kohl, 2222 First avenue NE; Janet lone Lane, 2709 Johnson avenue NW; Helen Mayhew, Vinton; Don- ald Gene Miller, 279 Johnson av- enue NW; Roger Norton, Ana- mosa; Linda Kay Nulle, route three, Marion; Louis W. Per- nicka, 2426 Linwood street SW; Albert E. Perry, 618 Knoll street SE; J.D. Proffitt, 160 South Fifteenth street, Marion; Shirley Evelyn Rawson, Palo; Edward P. Schaefer, 1012 E ave- nue NW; Evelyn G. Seaver, Hia- watha; Thomas M. Shea, Fair- fax; Raymond Sinn, jr., Williams burg; Hilary C. Skow, 824 Six- teenth avenue SW; Annie Veal 2890 M c G o w a n boulevard Marion; Alfred Welper, 849 Fourth avenue, Marion; Mary R. Wheeler, 3859 Lost Valley road SE, and Charley Wyckoff, Vinton. bond." But Thompson replied, "I in good conscience could not set a bond lower than what he (Wil- liams) set for Mr. in fact, he did commit the abduc- tion." FBI agent Paul King testified at the hearing that Williams was the driver of a car spotted near where the ransom for Murphy was delivered. King said he and another agent saw a car near the ransom site on Georgia 400 and later pulled alongside it at a red light. Asked by Asst. U.S. Atty. John Gaffney if he could iden- tify the driver, King said, and pointed at Williams. (Continued from Page 1.) shortly before 10 a.m. from his nearby home. Wilson, head of Britain's first minority government in 45 years, called in union and in- dustry leaders for a meeting aimed at getting the country's bat t e r e d economy moving again. He phoned leaders of the 10 million-member Trades. Union Congress (TUC) and.the Confed- eration of 'British Industry, which represents compa- nies, to set up Tuesday's meet- ing. A holdup man who brandished a small silver pistol obtained an A grim-faced Edward Heath, looking like a beaten man, sub- mitted his resignation to Queen Elizabeth Monday. He later promised support "for whatever realistic measures the new gov- ernment takes in the service of the nation." The queen then asked Wilson lo form a minority government. Wilson drove straight from 3uckingham palace to 10 Down- ng St., lit his pipe and went to work. "Job To Do" "We've got a job to he said on the steps of his new of- undetermined amount of money saw on tne slePs ot nis new from a clerk Monday evening atfice with his wife by his side. Monday evening the Hy-Vee store, 2711 Mt. Ver- npn road SE. Police said the man was no- iced walking around in the store for about ten minutes be- fore he pulled the gun on Laura Scott, 17, at a cash regis- ter. The man ordered her to turn over the large bills. Several cus- tomers, who arrived at the store as the man was leaving, told police he may have fled in a car waiting in the parking lot. "We can only do the job as one people and I'm going right in to do the job now." Wilson, lacking a majority in the 635-seat house of commons, was expected to be restricted in his actions by the Liberal party, which holds the balance of power. Liberal leader Jeremy Thorpe said his party would bar what he called extremist measures such as 'pulling Britain out of the Common Market or nation- Police are looking for a black, alizing more industries' male, about 22 years old, 5 feet 10 inches, 150-170 pounds and wearing blue slacks and a blue' shirt. Nixon To Submit Election Reform WASHINGTON (AP) Pres- ident Nixon submit cam- paign reform legislation to congress by Friday, the White House said Tuesday. sional-initiated bills are already GAZETTE TELEPHONE NUMBERS Fat KIWI, Bookktiping, Gtnernl Inlop motion and Ollkts Nol liiltd iilou Cull ............................398-8211 Cluulolion-Suhmiplion Dipl.......393-6333 Mon. Ihru Sot. 8a.m. to 7 p.m. Sundoyi Until 12 Hooo Holiday! 11 a.m. lo 7 p.m. Mon. thru Fri. 8 a.m. lo 5p.m. Saturday unfit 12 Noon Oilploy Advitlning................398-8222 8 a.m. lo S p.m. Motion Olliti ....................398-8430 Justice's Father Dies RICHMOND, Va. (AP) Louis Franklin Powell, father of U." S. Supcrmc Court Justice Powell, died Monday at the age of 94. "Extra Touch" FTD Service PIERSON'S THOP" 1800 Ellis Blvd. NW FLOWERPHONE 366-1826 John B. Turner Son Flmeral Directors since 1888 Only one service...our best to all, Cost is entirely a matter of personal choice. 'Ilirner'sl-asi HOO Second Avc.Sl-: 'llirner'sWcsl Firm AVC. west'   

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