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Cedar Rapids Gazette Newspaper Archive: March 4, 1974 - Page 3

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Publication: Cedar Rapids Gazette

Location: Cedar Rapids, Iowa

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   Cedar Rapids Gazette (Newspaper) - March 4, 1974, Cedar Rapids, Iowa                                Rain or showers are expected Monday night in the vicinity of tho Great Lakes and Ohio valley, as well as along parts of -the mid-Pacific coast. Snow will be -found in parts of the northern Rockies. Elsewhere generally fair weather is expected. Obituaries Herbert M. McFaHane Herbert M. McFarlane, 78, of 224 Thirteenth street NW, died Sunday following a long illness.! Formerly of Chicago and Sun City, he had been a Cedar {apids resident five years. Born Dec. 15, 1890, at Cedar Rapids, lie was married to jraycc Sherwood Feb. 15, 1947, at East Chicago, Ind. He was a World war 1 veteran and was employed by 0. F. Jordan Co. in Chicago prior to his retirement. Mr. McFarlane was a 1921 grad- uate of Coe college. He was a member of the American Le- gion and the Masonic todge. Surviving is a sister, Ethel M. McFarlane, Cedar Rapids. Services: Chapel of Memories at a.m. Wednesday by the Rev. Ernest Larson of Trini- ty United Methodist church. Burial: Cedar Memorial. Friends may call at Cedar Me- morial funeral home after noon Tuesday and at the chapel after 9 a.m. Wednesday. The casket will be closed Wednesday. at a.m, Joseph F. Dostal Joseph F. Dostal, jr., 64, of 714 Thirty-fifth street SB, a lite- long resident of Cedar Rapids, died Saturday following a long illness. Born Feb. 11, 1910, he was married to Libbie Sophia Burcsh July 3, 1937, at Cedar Rapids. A World war II veteran, he was employed by Cherry- Burrell Corp. for 27 years. Mr. Dostal was a member of United Auto Workers local 102C and the Veterans Special Police Organi- zation. Surviving are a brother, Dave P., of Palo. The Weather Hloh Icmperalures Sunday, low temp- eratures overntflht and Inches of pre- cipitation: Anctiorane .3011 L. Anqeles 5! Atlanta ___7347 Miami .....73 S2 Bismarck ..37 36 Min'apolis .44 29 Chlcano ...7242.07 N. Orleans BO tt Denver ....52 21 .a New York .43 41 .01 Duluth ___3613.07 Phoenix ...7148 Honolulu ..8171 scallle ....4437.02 Houston ...78 66 Washington 72 58 C. R. Weather High Sunday .................67 Low overnight ...............44 Noon Monday -39 38 Precipitation...............0.34 Total for March ..'..........0.34 Normal for March..........2.4E Normal through March .....5.02 Total for 1974 Barometer, steady Humidity at Wind direction and velocity at Gazette weather station at 2 p.m. NE at 10 ta.p.h. Sun rises Tuesday, sun Year Ago Today High 48 low, 40; rainfall, 0.01. Traveler's Forecast Tuesday Weather, Hi-Lo Bismarck........PtCldy 42-l Chicago ........PtCldy 51-3: Cincinnati ......PtCldy Cleveland .....Shwrs 61-31 Des-Homes --...FtCldy 50-3: Detroit ........-Cloudy 51-31 Indianapolis .....Clrng 58-3  would not return lo work Ihl wcolc despite the delivery o gallon. Only one station operator re- ported his prices have gone down since the first of March and one other reported no increase this month. Clark No. 2, 3334 First avenue NE, reported the largest in- crease and highest prices at 56.9 for regular. The increase reflects a 6.3 cent per gallon increase from the company and a 2 cent per gallon increase allowed indepen- dent retailers by the Federal Energy Office lo cover increas- ing overhead and decreasing supplies. The Western Service Stalion nd Discount store, 3325 John- on avenue NW, reported the owest prices and the one-cent 3er gallon decrease. Offering only self-service fa- ililies, the company-operated tation is selling at '13.9 cents rer gallon for regular. The Linn Co-Operative sta- ion, 335 Thirty-fifth street i'larion, was the only, oilier sla- ion not reporting an increase in irices. (Continued from Page 1.) highways in the sfnte, it ap- parently would suffer the same veto late as the long- truck bill did. Ray acknowledged the viov han an okay to the border city )ill would put interior stock- yards such as those in Cedar lapids and Waterloo al a com pclilivc disadvantage wilh Siom City's. He' said he had consldcrcc Hint, but surveys show most in tenor stockyards get their live stock from inside Iowa rnthei [linn from bordering states. In......., it with flmrari PIERSON'S l UI.I.IS BLVD. NW Memorial Services Sec, William S. 1 p.m. in Chapel of Memories bloc into a broad coalition with the Labor party. Mrs. Meir said inclusion of Likud would be a "disaster for a na- tion." Dayan pledged support for Mrs. Meir, but refused to serve as defense minister in. a minori ly coalition despite the prim minister's pleas. A government official said th prospect of new elections would not immediately alter Israel's bargaining stance in next clean-up crew was expected to (live Bayne an estimate of tho ;ime needed to complete clean- up Monday afternoon. Bayne said the school's loss was fully covered by insurance. (Continued from Page 1.) statements over the weekend on the mistrial motion. Friday's sudden turn of events in the conspiracy trial followed a week of careful screening of hundreds of poten- tial jurors. The jury of eight men and four women selected Thursday was sequestered and continued to be kept in isolation as Gagliardi studied the mistrial motion. Speculation arose that had a mistrial been declared Monday, it would "have been more dif- ficult to find a-new jury especially after the Watergate indictments announced Friday. Among the seven former top Nixon administration officials named was Mitchell, charged with conspiracy, obstruction of ustice and making false state- ments. Mitchell and Stans are ac- cused of trying to impede a official said the huge crash are bargaining stance in nex might indicate an "explosion month's troop separation talk aboard before it hit the with Syria. He said it might y the Rev. Larry H. Engle. urial: Cedar Memorial. Ar- angements by Cedar Memorial uneral home. Politis, Constantino N. Monday at at Beatty- aeurle chapel by the Bev. Alexander George. Burial: Oak Hill cemetery. Also surviving re two stepsisters. Hazel 3cnnison, North English, and Mrs. Joe McNabb, Cedar Rapids, and two stepbrothers, Mbert Harris, Chicago, and Harris, North English. Schecti, Mary Elizabeth mmaculate Conception church Tuesday at 1 p.m. by the Rev. Richard J. Hess. Burial: Mt. Calvary cemetery. Arrange- lents by Tcahen chapel. The iosary will be recited Monday I C'30 p.m. by the Eev. Rich- rd .1. Hess and at by the Dominic club at the chapel. Foor, Daly E. Services vere conducted at Mon- day by the Rev. John P. Woods. Entombment: Chapel of Memo- ics. Meyer, Edith Buchanan 'timer chapel east at 'uesday by the Rev. Allen 6. 'an Clcve. Burial: Cedar Me- norial cemetery. Friends may all at Turner cast until 1 p.m. 'uesday. The casket will not be ipcned after the service. Wcllon, Ada 11 a.m. Tues- day at Beatty-Beurle chapel by he Rev. John Little. Burial: Cedar Memorial. The casket be closed at a.m. tude after takeoff, soaring up through the sunny, cool and al- most, windless skies. Then .-it suddenly banked sharply, lost altitude and plunged to the ground in a cartwheel. The plane hit the ground with a thunderous explosion, shatter- ing windows in homes on the rim of the forest. It broke into small bits after hitting the fro- zen, snowcovered woods. Authorities said it be impossible to identify mast of the bodies. "This is the most horrible sight I've ever a fireman at the scene said. The McDonnell-Douglas plane, which seats eight persons abreast in tourist class, was the first DC-10 to crash. Syria. He said it might take three months to arrange another vote. In other Mid-East develop- ments: Egypt called Monday for talks apparently aimed at lifting the Arab oil embargo against the U.S. following the windup of Israel's withdrawal from the Suez Canal and the start of troop separation talks with Syria. The Middle East news agency said President Anwar Sadat asked for a meeting of Arab oil ministers in Tripoli, Libya, next Sunday. New fighting between the Israelis and Syrians was report- ed on the Golan Heights. It was the first major outbreak since U. S. Secretary of State Kis- Securities and Exchange Com- mission fraud investigation into the financial activities of Robert L. Vesco.' The govern- ment charged that'in return, Vesco made a- secret contribution to President Nix- on's 1972 re-election cam- paign. Mitchell now 'faces a max- imum of 30 years in prison and in fines if convicted in Washington', in addition to.the 50 years both he and Stans could get in the New York case. The New York jury-of eight men and-four women was isolat- ed from news of the Watergate indictment. It will be seques- tered for the trial duration. singer persuaded the Syrians to release a list of prisoners of war as a prelude to disengagement talks with Israel. Amendment Passes House For Secret Bargaining and will not be opened ;he service. after Think small, use a Classified Ad for big results. Place your id today! DES MOINES (AP) The Iowa house decided Monday that collective bargaining nego- tiations between public bodies and their employes may be held in secret. In its ninth day of debate on the public employes' collective bargaining bill, the house adopt- ed (52-45) an amendment spell- ing out that meetings which may be closed included "stra- tegy sessions" of either side. Rep. Terry Brnnstad (R- Lcyland) protested that closed negotiating sessions would in- terfere with the public's right to know what their elective rcprcscntalives are proposing to do with their money. He said he doesn't know whal "strategy sessions" would in elude, and added: "A lot o decision-making is done behinc closed doors in smoke-fillet rooms in detriment to the pub lie's right to know." But Rep. Gregory Cusak (D Davenport) said both public cm ployers and employes will nce< a way to back down from 'strongly held, initial bargain- ng positions, and this can't be done in public." And Rep. David Stanley (R- Muscatinc) known as the fa- ther of Iowa's open meetings law, said negotiating sessions probably could be closed under the law as it stands. In any case, Stanley said, a requirement i that negotiating and strategy sessions be held in public would apply only to pub- lic employers. The open meetings law ap- plies only to public bodies, and employe organizations are not public bodies, Stanley said. Cabinet Approved RANGOON, Burma (AP) The People's Assembly Monday approved an 18-member cabine headed by Prime Minister Sein Win, the 54-year-old former con stmction minister. Seven Juveniles Arrested Sunday By C.R. Police Cedar Rapids police youth bureau officials reported seven juveniles were arrested in in- cidents Sunday. f, A 16-year-oid boy was charged with possession of a controlled substance and released to .his parents Sunday night. Police said .the youth had a'small quantity of a substance believed to be hashish when police were called to the boy's home by his father. In a separate incident, a 15- year-old boy was: charged with, possession of a controlled sub- stance when a substance beliey- 20 YEARS AGO State of ficials said 42 of Iowa's 99 coun- ties rejected free surplus food for distribution lo the unem- ployed and needy. 0 I- when words aren't enough send sympathy with flowers FLORIST and GIFT SHOP ;i64-8139 PHONE ANSWERED 2-1 HOURS EVERY DAY. ed to be marijuana was found in lis possession. Police were questioning him about a runaway girl when the substance was found. Two 16-year-old boys were caught inside the Ellis Branch YMCA about p.m. Sunday. The pair was charged .with breaking and entering and held in the counly jail overnight be- fore being processed and re- leased to their parents. The youths had entered the building by breaking out a win- dow on the building's southwest corner. Two youths are accused of malicious damage to a building in connection with damage at Grant Wood school Sunday night. The boys, ages 11 and 16, are- accused .of driving a car across the grass and attempting lo pry open the school's doors with a crowbar. A 14-year-old boy has been charged with larceny for alle- gedly taking 10 gallons of gas from a car Sunday night. JOHN E. Convenient Downtown Location 308 3rd Ave. SE 36S-05T1   

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