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Cedar Rapids Gazette: Friday, February 22, 1974 - Page 28

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   Cedar Rapids Gazette (Newspaper) - February 22, 1974, Cedar Rapids, Iowa                                14 The OJar Rapids GazfUe: Frl.. Feb. 22. 1974 Safety Expert: 'Can't Lose Another Farmer Wirephoto Farmland Designs Contour plowed land south of Grinnell provides an interesting background for these farm buildings as seen-from the air. High Food Prices Of Price Controls WASHINGTON A P _ With food prices zooming up- ward again, the administra- lion may be reluctant to lift wage and pHce controls from the food industry without solid anti-inflation commitments, Cost of Living Council of- ficials say. Kenneth Fedor, the coun- cil's top food expert, said the council hopes .it can lift con- trols from the food industry, along with most of the rest of the economy by April 30. But he indicated that in talks with food industry repre- sentatives, the council so far has been unable to reach agreement on price-restrain- ing commitments. Fedor said he did not know if the administration would seek to extend controls over the food industry after April 30 without such commitments. "I'm not sure anybody knows at this he said. Other council sources, who Lower Interest Announced by Farmers Home DES MOINES The Farm- ers Home Administration has reduced interest rates on home loans from 8% to 8'4 percent, according to a recent announcement by R. R. Pirn, state director; "This reduction of interest rate will make it possible for more low income families to achieve home Pirn said. The loan program is avail- able to low-income families with not more than ad- justed income and moderate- income families with not more than adjusted income who are unable to obtain con- ventional financing. Low-in- come families may qualify for reduced interest rates. Only homes located in rural areas or communities of not more than population arc eli- gible for financing. Over families in Iowa have participated in the pro- gram. During the past fiscal year Iowa families bor- rowed 35 million dollars of Farmers Home Administra- tion funds for home owner- ship. did not want to be named, said they believed the ad- ministration would have trou- ble lifting controls from food during a lime of rapidly rising prices. Prices of agricultural prod- ucts at the farm level were up 8.1 percent in January, the government reported, after a 36 percent increase in all of 1973. Although some administra- tion officials questioned whether controls helped re- strain retail food prices at all last year, Fedor thinks they have, especially for canned and frozen fruits and vegeta- bles, and, to a lesser extent, sugar and some dairy prod- ucts. "When people think controls didn't work in 1973, they are jumping to conclusions. There was a 36 percent increase at the farm level, that's the story of Fedor said in an interview. Fedor, administrator of the council Office of Food, said it was impossible to estimate how much food prices might have increased without con- trols last year and how much more they might increase if controls are lifted this year. Once they are lifted, howev- er, there will be a scramble by food manufacturers and distributors to build up their profit margins, which were restrained under the controls program, Fedor said. Prices at Ihe farm level were not subject to controls during 1973 and the food in- dustry was able to pass along the 36 percent increase in farm prices to the consumer automatically. But, Fedor said, the pinch on prices came al the food manufacturing and distribu- tion levels, including super- markels, because Ihey were not allowed to increase the amount of profits propor- tionate with increasing farm prices. By Al Surgle A University of Iowa safety expert. Dr. L. W. Knapp of Iowa City, Thursday called ihe farmer "an endangered species." "We can't afford to lose a n o I h e r farmer K u a p p director of the school's ace-idem prevention laboratory, told more than attending the Cedar Rapids Agricultural Kxecutives Forum luncheon. "It's time society pays ihe bill for some of Ihe hardships farmers face. Agriculture is the third most hazardous oc- cupational group in the nation today." Roll Guard Requirement In the near future, Knapp said farmers will see safety requirements m a k i n g roll guards on machinery and Court Threat Spurs FHA On Housing WASHINGTON (AP) The Rural Housing Alliance said Thursday that the Farmers Home Administration, con- fronted by possible court ac- tion, has decided to spend S8.3 million on grants to help build housing for farm laborers and their families. Administration officials a year ago canceled the grants entirely but later approved million for the grant program. The FHA, an agency of the agriculture department, con- firmed that notices to increase the grants were issued Feb. 14. No public announcement was made. Clay Cochran, executive director of the alliance, said grants are "absolutely essen- tial" to build facilities for farm laborers. "Farm workers and their families total more than a million and arc the most poorly housed people in rural lie said in a statement. Cochran said a class-action lawsuit was filed in U.S. dis- trict court on January 17 this year, asking the cancelation be held illegal. Congress last year appropri- ated S7.5 million for farm housing grants in addition to. S1.8 million remaining from earlier appropriations. Although FHA now intends to spend the million it has, the Nixon budget for the 1975 fiscal year beginning July 1 does not call for the pro- gram to be continued. Grants were aulhorized by congress in 1964 to help non- profit groups and public agen- cies pay up to 90 percent of the construction costs of farm labor housing projects. Linn Cattlemen Plan Program The Linn County Cattle- men's Association is planning an educational program on beef production on February 27, at the Linn Co-op Oil Co. in Marion al p.m. and p.m. The speaker for the pro- gram will be Stan Butt, man- ager of Norris Farms at Ha- vana, 111. The Norris Farms, consisting of acres, fea- ture a large commercial cow herd and cattle feeding opera- lion. Butt will discuss many items of inlerest to Linn county cattlemen including adapting a beef cow herd to a grain farm. Estimate Filed? Penalty Deadline Nears The farmer who did not file C-0-M-I-N-G FARM AUCTIONS AJ Previously Advertised in The Gazelle Farm Pages Saturday, Feb. 23: sale. I p.m., mach., hh, ooods, Floreni Petcrscn, 3 ml. NE ol Oellc Plolnc. Close oul sole, p.m., cattle, Merle Mills, 4 ml. NE of Center Point. Form sale, moch., cor, Morvln Bosler, 5 mi. S ol Manchester. Sundav, Feb. H: Aucllon, 12, moch., hoos, feed, Don Holub, 3 ml. sw ol Cos- code. Wednesday, Feb. 27: Cloie oul sole, I p.m., Orvllle Wrldhl, I ml. it al Toddvllle, Saturday, March 2: Close tut sale, I p.m., much., misc., hh. aoods, Marvin Wllsy, 3 j ml. SE ol Walker. a declaration of estimated federal individual income tax by Jan. 15 must file his 1973 tax return and pay all tax due by March 1 to avoid a penalty. L a r r y Lawson, Cedar Rapids Internal Revenue Ser- vice office manager, explain- ed farmers are defined as those who earned at least two- thirds of their 1973 gross in- come from farming. Those fanners who did file declarations of estimated tax by Jnn. 15 need only complete their returns and pay taxes due by the normal April 15 deadline, he said. The penally for failing lo file and pay by March 1 amounts to six percent inter- est. Those paying their taxes by chuck should "check" their checks before including with Iheir lax returns. "The Kansas City service center receives a large number of checks every day that are not properly filled Lawson reported. "The most common error is failing to sign the check." Some checks received arc made oul for the wrong amount while olhers are made oul lo department stores, gas- oline companies, stale tax agencies and grocery stores, he said. When an invalid check is received, the IRS sends it back lo (lie taxpayer and begins processing the tax re- turn as one on which money is owed, Lawson warned. The taxpayer will be billed for the amount owed and, in the case of returns received on a due falluro-lo-pay penally is added, he said. safety guards on power-lake- off equipment mandatory, foreiw: moro stringent anhy- drous ammonia equipment standards, and forcing hired men to lake special equip- ment training. The roll guard rules are al- ready being formulated. Knapp said. The promised regulations, which will be published soon, would prohibit farm employes from operat- ing tractors without roll bars. "The regulations would not affect the owner and his fami- ly who would use the tractor." Knapp said. "This may not be good, as more accidents occur with the job tractor' than the big- ger models." The average tractor today is 12 years old, Knapp said, which indicates that there are a good number of "odd job tractors" around. Tractors Knapp also pointed out that the tricycle model tractors are considered the "odd job tractors" today, as most oper- ators prefer the handling abi- lity of the models with (he wide front end. i "While only 40 percent of the tractors today are of the tricycle type, they account for tit) percent of all Knapp said. Knapp admitted that it would be difficult to drive a tractor with an anlirnll frame through a dairy barn, "but not many farmers drive tractors I b r u u g h kirns anymore. They've got barn cleaners." OSHA on The Farm Knapp said the Occupa- tional and Safety and Health Act rules affect farm employ- es, but he said that he didn't know if the rules are being enforced. One rule requires the use of a slow-moving-vehicle trian- gular safety emblem on farm equipment. Meat Imports Show Drop WASHINGTON De- spile ('resident Nixon upvniiiK the dour (o more meat from foreign countries last year, shipments to U.S. markets ac- tually dipped Mow 1972, ac- cording to agriculture depart- ment figures. Imports totaled 1-354 billion pounds in 1973. down from 1.355 billion in 1972, the de- partment said in a report compiled by the Foreign Agri- cultural Service. N i x u n suspended import quotas in June 1972 fur the remainder of that year and continued the open door in 1973. The quotas also have been lifted for this year. The quotas, based on a 1964 law, apply only to fresh, fro- wn aiul chilled beef. veal, m u 11 o n and gout meat, dinned or processed meal is not restricted. Most of the quota-type meal is beef used for hamburger and other manufactured products. Department officials had es- timated imports would total 1.4 billion pounds last year. But demand among many oilier countries pulled away large quantities which other- wise would have gone In U.S. buyers. For 1974, USDA estimates imports of quota-type meat will ri.su to 1.575 billion pounds. Early American Sofa Your Choice of colors Regular Special 1 2 Piece Traditional 95 Rich velvet covers- your choice of colors Regular Special B 3 Cushion, 84 inch length, long wearing Herculon cover. Regular Special 95 3 Cushion Traditional Sofa Rich vevet cover. Regular Special 3 Piece Spanish Living Room Set Sofa and Mr. Mrs. chairs, beautiful velvet cover. Regular Special 95 2 Piece Spanish Sofa and matching chair, velvet cover. Regular Special Decorator Cover Regular Special Durable Herculon Cover, 4 inch foam mattress. Regular Special >95 Velvet Covered Occasional Chairs Your choice of several Regular Special High Back Swive! Rockers Top quality covers, many at this price. Regular Special 99 95 Solid Oak 3 Piece Bedroom Set Dresser, mirror, chest and head-board. 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