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   Cedar Rapids Gazette (Newspaper) - February 19, 1974, Cedar Rapids, Iowa                                My. lly Abigail Van Iluren DEAR ABBY: Gary and 1 went sleady for two years and on Christmas day he gave me a diamond and officially an- nounced our engagement. (I'm 21 and Gary is 24.) My parents have always liked Gary and 1 know they wcren'l surprised, but they are very much upset you ready for didn't ask my father for my hand. Abby, it would have been only a formality and actually it nev- er crossed Clary's mind or mine. 1 think since my parents felt so strongly about this they should have told me so I could have tip- ped Gary off. He'd have gone through the whole bit just to make them happy. Does a man still ask the fa- ther for his daughter's hand? Or is it an old-fashioned, out-dated custom? NOT ASKED FOR DEAR NOT: Some still do. Al- though it's only a formality, the man who asks a girl's father for her hand is sure to start down the aisle on the right foot. DEAR ABBY: I am a 26-year- old single black man. I played pro football for a few years, have a degree In business man- agement and a good job. I am six-foot, five inches, weigh 240 and have been told I'm handsome. I neither smoke nor drink, am in excellent health and work out in the gym three times a week. I'm a good dancer, own a late model car and have no skeletons in my closet. I know many young la- dies, but some of the married ones are too friendly and a rela- tionship with a married lady, is not my tiling, so that's out. All the single chicks I know have boyfriends and I am not one to break up a romance, so that's out. I'm clean, well-dressed, po- lite, and use the mouthwash people hate, but I can't seem to get a girl. Why? WANTS COMPANIONSHIP DEAR WANTS: You must be kidding! Pass the word to your friends (married or single) that you are interested in: meeting a luce chick com. panionship and you'll need the Pittsburgh Steelers to run Inter- ference for you. DEAR ABBY: "Piggy Bank Peggy" wrote to you saying she cured her husband of using ob- jectionable language by getting a piggy bank and making him put a quarter in.it every time he used a swear word and a dollar every time he used a really dirty word. Seeing as how I had the same problem with my husband, I tried it. It didn't work. He got mad, used a swear word and asked me for 75 cents change, saying he had a "dollar" word in mind but used a 25 cent word instead. LITTLE OLD CHANGE-MAKER DEAR ABBY: Is it possible for a man to love two women at the same time? NETTIE DEAR NETTIE: Yes, but it would be very tiring. Problems? You'll, feel better if you get it off your chest. For a personal reply, write to ABBY: BOX No. Los Angeles, Calif. D0069. Enclose stamped, self-addressed envelope, please. For Abby's new booklet, "What Teenagers Want to send to'Abigail Van Buren, 132 Lasky Dr., Beverly 90212. Furnishings Con Add, Decrease Warmth During Winter Months American 'Scene The Cedar Kapids 9 Gazette: Tun., Feb. 19, 1914 Hy Vivian lirowu Lot your furnishings help keep you warm. That's the message from one furniture company exec- utive who thinks we could borrow some tips from early Americans and the early English who didn't know cen- tral heating. In addition to reviving long- dormant functions of certain pieces of furniture, Gus Tron, a vice-president of Drcxel- lleritqge, suggests scouting the attic for old downy quills or braziers (heat-fired pans with grilles) and the like that might still be utilized to do what they were intended to do. "Winged chairs with their gracefully angled shoulders might be placed to protect us from uneven temperatures and other furniture might be shifted about with thai idea in mind. "People with canopy beds might consider curtaining them for draft-free sleeping, drawing the draperies at night. Furniture might also be more cozily arranged for fireplace huddling." Although Tron came to the United Slates 25 years ago as a scholarship exchange stu- dent from Italy to Bluffton college in Ohio, he decided to stay when he fell in love with the furniture business. It pro- vided him with the opportuni- ty to use his talents in the design arts. Foils "Many households in Eu- rope used furnishings as a foil to the cold and chill. Heavy draperies were hung in doorways and, of course, in medieval times large tapes- Facing lovcseafs before a fireplace can comfort a chilly home. Also dark woods used throughout a room can contribute to a warm -feeling. tries were used on he points out. In the United States at the turn of the century heavy vel- vet or damask portieres were in doorways and used as a decorative asset with differ- ent colors on either side com- plementing the rooms they separated. As for wall hangings, wall rugs are now popular and could be utilized for their in- sulation qualities. In fact, wall-to-wall carpet is a great insulator, Tron reminds us. Arrangement Fuel shortage or not, the proper arrangement of furni- ture might make us more comfortable in winter. Draft- free nooks and crannies should be utilized wherever possible, he suggests. "Work and study activities with their demands on con- centration deserve special treatment. A desk might be placed under a stairway nook to increase both comfort and efficiency." Most people pull their blindt during cold weather when they arc trying to con- serve heal, but if one is due for new draperies Tron rec- ommends heavy opaque ones that help retain heat and save nlr-eondltlonlng energy. He also advises keeping closet doors shut, especially those on outside walls. Psychology Many psychological factors are involved in warmth, he reminds us. A fireplace makes us feel cozy even if we just look at it. Wood, heavy fab- rics and warm colors also re- inforce the feeling of warmth. Mirrors, too, can provide these warm feelings when they reflect a fireplace, greenery or light. Too many cold looking furnishings metal, glass and plastic may provide psychic chills. Since women like to move furniture about, the warm winds of spring and summer could provide an incentive to rearrange everything. If furniture suffers from a lack of humidity, bathtubs may be filled with water to provide moisture that will make us feel more comfort- able. Pans of water on radi- ators may also be effective, suggests Tron, who has been with the High Point, N. .C., furniture company for more than 20 years. Pol 1974 by h'EA, f "I hate to tell you this Fred, but I'm alraid we guessed wrong. The unisex look Is out. nis year, the F, Scott and Zelda Fitzgerald look is Princess Catherine Napoleon To Marry Italian Prince Authors See Need for Reassessment of Female Managers By 3ay Pauley NEW YORK (DPI) The help-wanted sign is out for more women in management. There's room at the top, but climbing up there calls for women in business and indus- try to get out of their spe- cialization rut and for men to assess women's abilities in a new light. Two men, ,who have left be- hind the specialization syn- drome, examine the problems of women moving ahead. They report that, in working with many companies who want to find more women managers, and again we find that women tend to get trapped within a narrow, specialized hierarchy we've begun to see that specialization repre- sents not just a skill but a psychological investment. Fear Risks "They equate their own se- curity and value to the com- pany with their particular spe- cialist skills, and they fear the risks involved in giving up those skills :to learn a new job even at a higher level. Men sort of feel that women are more competent, more productive in a special- ized field. Women find that's where they find their security, their recognition. They rein- force each others assump- tions." The two that have written "Women in Management: what Needs To Be are Drs. Margaret Helming and Anne Jardim. Both have served on the faculty of the Harvard business school and have done extensive consult- ing work with corporations in the area of educating and up- grading women managers, Their dual writing1 appears in the current issue of Con- text, duPont's house publica- tion. The two say they're not talk- ing about the five percent who are the "stars" and will blaze through anything. "We're re- ferring to the average, compe- tent woman who could be successful at the middle man- agement level in the 'same way that the average compe- tent man is." "When men look at women in management, they tend to see the best of the women as average. When they look at men, they do not look at them in-the same way. "For the average woman to make it, she is expected to be as much.like a man as she can. Yet to bring out her real "skills and abilities, she can hardly afford to spend the time it takes to be like a man. "A woman manager has to have the most incredible sources of energy. She not only has to manage the job; she has to summon up enough energy to be superior in the job just to be called average." She also has to deal with the conflict of other women around her who are "still caught in the specialist bind and who still feel they have been suc- cessful and are doing quite well 'for 'a woman.'" The Drs. Herining and Jar-, dim say that any male man- ager who wants to get more women into similar jobs is going to have "to re-evaluate his own way of thinking." In any company, where there's a woman who's really "initiating, who's doing all the things like a really hot-shot man, a very good, decent man- ager is going to believe she's the kind he wants in his department.'' But if he's going to continue to equate most women With that one he isn't "go- ing to open his mind enough nor is he going to take time to uncover other Women who have potential." As more women come into management, the' two consul- tants see a better organization "in terms of productivity, work environment, creativity." It goes beyond the cliche of women as a vast talent re- source "it's that their pres- ence will allow both men and women to be more creative." Adverlliement The Best Carpet Buys Are At Carpetland U.S.A. L Put on the dog. Wllb short-order, loiifl-on-fliwor "Reuben (MnkcsT-lOilcrvlnns) 1 Ib. (-'rank's Qunllly Krmil, 1 envelope Sloppy  lecloth and quite by accident liscovered that this plastic is ;reat for rolling pie dough on. The dough does not stick like t does to my dough board and I lave such a nice large surface o work on. Also a piece of clear plastic ilaced over my open cookbobk s easy to read through and here are no spills on the book. -MABEL Dear Polly To remove stubborn rust stains from my Dalhroom basin I put the plug in, place a cloth over all the slain and pour vinegar over the cloth. Let stand for quite a time and tha stains will dis- appear. MRS. E. M. W. WASHINGTON'S BIRTHDAY SPECIAL; Offer Good 'til March 1 Lecithin Capsules 100 Caps 250 Caps 500 Caps MATTESON HEALTH PRODUCTS L.11615th St. N.E. I We Mail Order J Ilten's GENERAL ELECTRIC and FRIGIDAIRE and "GEORGE" clean-house! NOW THROUGH FRIDAY! FREE Start enjoying yours right now! llten's make history with this big event! Smart Appliance buyers! You've been waiting... Now's your chance...0nly 3 more days We cannot tell a lie...we chopped prices! Come in soon...and we're open Monday and Thursday nite 'til Come join us in a cup of coffee...? SALE ENDS FRI. FEB 22. How crazy can you get? Come and see. WASHERS DRYERS TELEVISION REFRIGERATORS FREEZERS RANGES DISHWASHERS SCRATCH 'N' DENT HALF-PAIRS, ONE-OF- A-KIND...CHOP-CHOP! Men's 363-0283 106 Second Avenue SW Wesf End of 2nd Ave Bridge. Open all Day Saturday.   

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