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Cedar Rapids Gazette Newspaper Archive: February 18, 1974 - Page 6

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Publication: Cedar Rapids Gazette

Location: Cedar Rapids, Iowa

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   Cedar Rapids Gazette (Newspaper) - February 18, 1974, Cedar Rapids, Iowa                                Voters urged to saw presidential timber EditorialPage Monday- febnioiy 18. 1974 Regulating cable TV IF THE LEGISLATURE passes a bill creating a 12-member, part-time cable television ad- visory commission, it is conceiv- able that 50 years hence lowans will look back and praise today's lawmakers for exhibiting some foresight. If they do, they can thank State Rep. Arthur Small of Iowa City. Small became interested a year ago in the need for some state guidelines to regulate the new ca- ble television industry before it grandfathers itself into situations that should never have been allowed to develop. Due to his persistence, the legislature passed a resolution last session setting up a study committee to deal with the sub- ject. The committee came out with a rather weak-kneed recom- mendation that Governor Ray ap- point a committee to work with cable- television promoters and developers. But the governor didn't fall for that. He put it right back in the legislature's lap where it belongs witli a recommendation that a cable television advisory committee be created. The house commerce commit- tee, with Rep. Small playing a leading role, last week voted out a bill to create a state cable television advisory commission. As written, the bill doesn't give the commission much authority, which is a mistake. But it is a start. There is a definite need to establish guidelines and stan- dards, in the public interest, for cable television as the industry expands through Iowa. Presidents' mental fitness PRESIDENT NIXON has emerged from a physical examination with an A- OK rating. In fact, he is in "ex- cellent according to Maj. Gen. Walter Tkach, Mr. Nixon's personal physician. That finding, plus word of the President's emotional good health, should please all responsi- ble Americans, regardless of political persuasion or views on the Watergate mess. Yet the intense round of X-ray- ing, Cardiographing and blood- pressure testing calls to mind a serious omission in the health examinations given our Chief Executives: The President of the United States should have a regular psychiatric checkup. No matter how emotionally sta- ble a President appears, he should undergo meticulous mental fit- ness tests befitting the holder of one of the world's most exacting jobs. The President's war-making powers further dramatize the need. Obviously, the custom isn't likely to take root during the Nixon administration. The move most surely would be ascribed to Watergate pressures or this President's alleged eccentricities. But the nation's next President could make the innovation without casting undue doubt on his own stability or that of his predeces- sor. Certainly Americans now are sophisticated enough to cast out old stereotypes surrounding therapy with "shrinks." And a huge majority, newsmen includ- ed, doubtless would appreciate the tight publicity grdundrules which presidential psychiatric tests would demand. The information from them would go only to a small core -of American leaders. Other citizens could feel as- surance, meanwhile, in the knowledge that their President's needs were being administered to. Grammy's TV PRODUCER Dick Clark (not to be confused with Iowa's junior senator) may not be noted for original thinking, but his "American Music Awards" for- mat (ABC, Feb. 19) sounds fairly promising. Winners of 1973's pop, soul and country music awards will be chosen by the public, for a change. The contrast with the music in- dustry's incest-laden Grammy Awards show (CBS, March 2) ob- viously is intentional. Clark's idea actually is borrowed from major league baseball's balloting format for the All-Star game. And that brings to mind the one inherent flaw in such pulse-taking: Inordinate local campaigning. When the public chose its first baseball dream team 18 years ago, Cincinnati's infant-to-octogenarian voter stampede put eight Redlegs on the National League's starting team. The team's third-place finish that year verified that not all were stars. If some of the music world's lesser lights score heavily in music awards balloting, the same grassroots influence can be sus- except, perhaps, in the country music division, where everyone seems to be from Nash- ville. Potential drawback aside, though, Clark's idea is a refreshing antithesis to the Grammy hoopla. We'll give him an 85. Political putdown Barry belts 'Scoop' By Rowland Evans and Robert Novak WASHINGTON A blistering attack on Sen. Henry M. Jackson by his old friend, Sen. Barry M. Goldwater, stunned a blue-ribbon audience of top U.S. industrialist here lasl week who had invited the 1964 Republican presidential nominee to give them a closed-door political talk. The Goldwater assault was not per- sonal, but in striclly political terms il soughl lo lay bare whal Goldwaler called "the myth" of Jackson as a conservative Democral close lo big business. Nol al all, said the usually mild-man- nered Goldwaler: "Scoop" Jackson was parading in conservativo-Democralic sheepskin, concealing the wolf of economic populism. Playing on his virtual ostracism by Ihe lefl wing of Ihe Democratic party, Jack- son has concealed Ihe economic liberalism thai makes olhcr liberal Democrats anathema lo U. S. business, Goldwaler said. Bui in fact, Goldwater went on, Jack- son represents a profound threat to American business. He cited Jackson's Senator Jackson Senator Goldwater sponsorship of the bill to place govern- ment and public members on boards of directors of major U. S. oil companies. That, he implied, could be the beginning of the end of Ihe free cnlerprise system. The next target, Goldwater said, will be steel. As prime archilccl of fedcraliz- ing major American industries, Gold- water claimed, Jackson musl be per- ceived as a skillful and dangerous an- jLagonisl. Moreover, with full political backing of the powerful American- Jewish community, said Goldwater, and his "100 percent" pro-labor voling record, Jackson looms loday as the most potenl presidcnlial threat agalnsl Ihe Republicans In 1976. Publisher's Moll Svnuicole By Roscoe Drummond WASHINGTON Isn't it about time that you and I and other inlereslvd citizens played a bigger role in picking candidates for presidential nomina- tions? The choice has always been far tec restricted, too narrow, too unrepresenta- tive the process itself barring hundreds of Qualified Americans just because they don't get mentioned at the right time by the right people in order to be considered. Recently President Nixon came out with his list of Republican presidential potentials, four in all Gerald Ford, Nelson Rockefeller, Ronald Reagan and John Connally. And when the Democrats talk about their 1978 potentials, they are fewer than the fingers of one hand Edward Ken- nedy, Henry Jackson, George Wallace and Walter Monda'le. Four! There ought to be 40-or 400. Aren't there that many Americans or more with the capacity and the character to be worth looking at as presidential prospects? There are, but the party system has become so inbred that the key to the front door or even the back door is given to very few. How few? Fewer than you could possi- forum Checkoff? To the Editor: For anyone working on income tax re- lurns, we would like to call attention to the presidential election campaign fund checkoff an optional way to participate in the political process. If you choose to have 51 (joint return designated to go to the fund for use in the 1976 presidential election, it will neither cost you more taxes nor reduce any refund you may have coming. This is the On Form check box for yourself (and spouse, if joint) on line 8. If you did nol do this last year on the separate sheet provided and you now choose to do so, check the jusl above Ihe signalure lines, "Note: 1972 Presidential Election Cam- paign Fund Designation." On Short Form 1040A check same as above on line 8 on Ihe front and Ihe "1972 on the back of this form. On Iowa income tax forms, just above the signature lines on page 1, Iowa Elec- tion Campaign Fund, you may designate (joint to the political party of your choice by marking the appropriate boxes for yourself and spouse, if joint return, Democratic or Republican. If you made a political donation during 1973, you claim a tax credit by entering one-half of the amount donated (maximum joint on line 52, page 2 of Form 1040, or line 18 of Short Form 1040A. Or if you itemize your deductions on Form 1040, you may claim a tax deduction by entering the amount you donaled on line 33, Schedule A (maximum joinl You cannot do bolh, so choose either "credil" or "deduction." On Iowa income tax forms, you claim a lax deduction for political donations made in 1973 by entering the amounl donated on line 4, part IV, page 2 (maximum S100, individual or joint re- Bolh federal and slate instruclion booklets give more details. Help also is available from Ihe IRS office, Federal building, Cedar Rapids (366-0436) and from the stale lax office al 736% Eleventh street, Marion Margaret S. Smith, Presideni Mary Rinard, Represenlalive Govt. League of Women Voters of Cedar Rapids-Marion Prices, wages To the Editor: A good long look til the way the prices of everything have risen sharply over the lasl 12 months has left me with the feeling that there will never be a ceiling for any of the products and services thai we all enjoy today. It appears the below- average earner will continually sink into a mudholc of poverty. The OEO and HEW are working-to minimize the families victimized by this terrible dilemma. However, these departments have been defeated in their purpose by a lack of constant price con- trols. Prices increase but wages do not increase correspondingly. Many com- panies are in a tighl time production down, energy short, supplies sometimes hard to obtain. This can only mean Ihcse companies cannot give wage increases lo coincide with the rising prices of nearly everything consumed today. To eornba'l Ihls problem, I would like to see a committee that would set a wage for every type of work done in Iho world (or United Stales) today. But al the same time of selling the wage, maybe II should be sllpulated thnl the fewer jobs there are, the higher Ihe wages will be for those Roscoe Drummond bly believe. Consider that in a span of 10 presidential nominating years from 1936 through 1972 only 47 Republicans received sufficient attention io attract even 1 percent support. Democrats did a little better but not much. Democratic voters gave at least 1 percent support to a total of 62 candidates. Think of it: In 36 years a nation of millions of voters produced only 109 per- sons who were even faintly considered as possible presidential nominees by the two parties. That's nol good enough. Something should be done about it; something CAN be done about it. The American Assembly, a project initiated by Gen. Dwight Eisenhower when he was president of Columbia who are working. That would be no different than raising Ihe prices on an article as it becomes less abundant. Robin Lentz Lisbon 'Veto' power To the Editor: Regarding your editorial of Feb.. 12, tax-supported school lunch programs are a public health measure which should be available in all schools, public or private. A hungry child should not be penalized because Ihrough no choice of his own he has inherited membership in a church operating its own school. This is not an opening wedge to destroy Insights t think there is only one quality worse than hardness of heart, and that is softness of head. Theodore Roosevelt university, recently examined Iww "le two parties so about looking for good presidential candidates. It concluded that they hardly go about it at all. It proposed "that well before the nominating process begins, national, state and local party organizations, members of congress, state and local of- ficials and private organizations not only assess such candidates as present them- selves but also conduct a systematic search for persons who could be en- couraged to contend for the presidential nomination." In response to this useful idea, the Ripon Forum is conducting its own search" for likely-to-be- overlooked presidential prospects by in- viting its subscribers to suggest names. That's good, but I would like to broaden the search. I would like to invite readers of this column to offer their suggestions of both Republican and Democratic prospects who ought to be considered by the rank-and-file of both parties and by the party organizations. Draw on your knowledge of men and women in public and civic life, in business and the professions. Try to propose someone in your own stale or your own community. Omit the familiar names. church-state separation. It should be considered as in a similar category as fire and police protection and other public services which nonpublic schools now receive. As stated in editorials on various sub- jects, the question should not be decided on theory alone but also with considera- lion of practical realities. In many areas voters with an interest in nonpublic schools comprise a balance of power in their districts. Thus they are capable of vetoing desired improvements in public education if they object to increased taxation to support benefits in which they will not share. W. V. St. Peter 613 Eighteenth street SE Church subsidies To the Editor: I highly commend you for your edi- torial Feb. 12, "Re-run of hot lunch I am grateful that you have the courage to speak out for the rights of all citizens under the Constitution. I sincerely believe the silent majority agrees with you. 1 am not against parochial schools as long as they remain parochial and not subsidized by the state or federal government. However, as a firm and outspoken advocate of the separation of church and state, I believe that those who wish private education for their children must be willing to bear the burdens and sacrifices it involves. May you continue to have the fortitude The purpose ot this poll is not to try to nominate anybody or prove llu- iwptiliirily of anybody. II is lo begin a broader search for candidate material from tlie rich talent of those who have not tud much if political Your Democratic proposals will be sent to the Democratic national committee. Your Republican proposals will go both to the Republican national committee and the Ripon Forum If you are interested, please suggest the names of three candidates and mail them, (on the form below) to Rescue Drummoiid, 1290 National Press Bldg., Washington, D.C. 20004. Los Anueles Times Sviullcote White House worthy MX suggestions for 1 976 Republican or Democratic presidential nominees are: 1 to speak out for most of us who see our freedoms and liberties gradually being erroded. We, too, fight for our constitu- tional rights, but an editorial not only is read by more people than letters to the editor, it also carries much more weight. Herbert F. Beer 1017 C avenue NW Unamused To the Editor: In reference to a filler item some time ago by Carl Riblel, jr., I would like to say this: What is'the truth? A plumber, an electrician or an appliance repairman I'm not. But in defense of those who are, Riblet's remarks about robbers and guns were misleading. I agree, these craftsmen are paid well to perform duties, which most homeowners cannot do. But so are many other specialized people. Furthermore, with the description most homeowners give, lo think any of these craftsmen could bring all the tools and parts that may be required to make a repair is like expecting a doctor lo stop at the scene of an accident and pull a hos- pital out of his little black bag. Crooks are criminals, ignorance is ig- norance, and paying for something you cannot take care of yourself is only fair. Loren K. Srigley 1564% Second avenue SE Compliance limited Voluntary rationing preferred By Louis Harris The Harris Survey "D Y 66 to 21 percent, a sizable majority of the American people prefer a system of voluntary rationing of gasoline to a system under tight control of the federal government. By 54 to 29 percent, a majority holds the view that "the public's voluntary cutback on the use of energy will be enough to get us through the worst of the energy shortage." In general, then, the American people tend lo agree with the judgment of energy czar William Simon and the ad- ministration that a national system of gasoline rationing, involving coupons and tight controls over consumption of gasoline, is not necessary. However, when asked ab6ut "a system under which people restrict their use of gasoline to 10 gallons per car a the public was dubious (49-34 percent) that it would work. And when car drivers themselves were asked if they would restrict their own usage to 10 gallons a week per car, 57 percent indicated they would, while a significant 38 percent said they would not. As an increasing number of states take to the Oregon system of rationing (under which cars with even numbered license plates get gas on even numbered days and the odd numbered on odd days, with everyone being able to get gas on Satur- days and no one on it appears lo the American people that the country will just about muddle through the gasoline shortage this winter and spring. Between Jan. 18 and 22, a cross-section of households across the nation was asked: "All in all, to cose Iho onargy shortage, would you personally prefer a system of voluntary gasoline rationing that is limiting use lo 10 gallons per car par wook or would you prefer a system of mandatory governmental A major reason why people prefer a voluntary system of restrainl is that they feel voluntary eulbacks in consumption of gasoline will be sufficient to get through the crisis. The cross-seclion was asked: "Do you feel the public's voluntary cutback on the use of energy will be enough to get us through the worst of the energy shortage, or do you think the government will hove to take stronger Louis Harris Voluntary cutbacks enough Nezd stranger govt. measures Not sure.............. Total public 54 29 17 Despite their preferences and their judgment that the public will come through on reslricling the use of gasoline, a plurality also has a gnawing doubl thai enough people will violate a voluntary rationing system so that it might not work. People were asked: "Do you think a system under which people restrict their use of gasoline to 10 gallons per cor a week will work os a way of avoiding mandatory rationing or Will work Will not Not sure Total Dublk 34 49 17 When the 81 percent who are drivers were asked what they and their families would do about voluntarily restricting their use of gasoline, a substantial minority (24 percent) said flatly they would nol cooperate: "Do you think you ond your fomlly certainly will, possibly will, possibly will not, or certainly will nol limit yourselves lo 10 gollons of gasoline per car rj Voluntary Mandatory Not suro Told! nuhllt 66 21 13 Cortalnly will Possibly will Possibly will nal Certainly will nol Not lure Total drivers 31 26 14 24 5 Although 57 percent indicate they will abide by a 10-gallon restriction, 38 per- cent say they will not. A key question, then, is whether the 38 percenl minority will indulge itself in so many excesses of usage that this will cause the essentially voluntary system of restraint to break down. The most serious situation appears lo be shaping up on the East Coast, where a majority of 51 percent of the public does not think voluntary restrictions on gasoline will work and where 43 percent of the drivers say they will nol abide by volunlary cutbacks. The East Coast is more dependent on oil from abroad lhan any other section of the country, and therefore stands the biggest risk of being in short supply. At the moment, then, it appears thai people ncilhcr expect nor think (hat gasoline rationing is necessary. But they arc nervous and edgy about depending on voluntary restraints. If the lines and the waiting for thrco or five gallons of gasoline continue to lengthen or spread, It Is nol hard lo forob-eo n turnaround In public opinion and strong demand emerging for'a federal mandatory system of gasoline rationing. Chlciioo Trlbun. New York Newt bvnillciilo   

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