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   Cedar Rapids Gazette (Newspaper) - February 16, 1974, Cedar Rapids, Iowa                                Chaplain Training One-of-a-Kind Program Ky Pat Peterson "The chaplain internship program at St. Luke's and Mercy hospitals is the only joint noman Calholic-Prol- cstsnt chaplain training pro- gram in the U. S. I know said SI. IjAe's Chaplain Rus- sell C. Striffler. The Clinical Pastoral Educa- tion (CPE) program, started in June, l'J71, by Chaplain Striffler, has attracted 28 stu- dents of eight faiths from nine slates and two foreign coun- tries. The present class of interns has four students, the Rev. Louis Gustilo, Brooklyn, N. The chaplain interns meet daily with patients in the hos- pital as part of their train- ing. The Rev. John Fahr, left, spent some time with the Rev. Charles Sommers while he was in the hospital. Be- low, the Rev. Russell Striffler, left, goes over some lesson material with the Rev. Leon Bolen and the Rev. David Tuiring. C Additional Church News on Page 6 Pholos by Tom Merfvman Church Briefs Ecumenical Service Set Churches United is sponsoring an "Experience of Unity" ecu nienical service Sunday at p.m. at 'All Saints Catholi church. The theme of the service i "We Need To Come Together" The service will not have any o the traditional preaching or of fering but will include rnusica groups, Scripture reading and candle-lighting service. The Rev. Mr. and Mrs. Bill Ricdel will present revival services beginning Tuesday Easf lowan Is Honored DES MOINES (AP) An Eastern Iowa minister was one of seven lovvans recognized by the Iowa board of Christian Rural Overseas Program (CROP) for leadership in a campaign to stop hunger around the world. The seven, cited for their work with CROP, are Paul Gra- ven, Newton; the Rev. Dick Harberts, Postville; Mrs. Ken- neth Harris, Atlantic; Nelson Nieuwenhuis, Hospers; the Rev. Robert Rotgers, Fort Madison; the Rev. John Saxton, Prim- ghar, and 'the Rev. Richard Wenger, Wayland. Slate CROP Director Max Gumm said Iowa volunteers last year raised through hunger walks, cash contribu- tions and blanket, orop and live- stock donations. through March 3 at the First Pentecostal church. Services will begin each evening at with the exception of Feb. 25 when no services will be held. For the fourth consec'utiv year the Dubuque Archdiocesa Sf. Paul's Notes SOfh Anniversary ANAMOSA-St. Paul's Luther an church will celebrate its 501 anniversary of organization Sa urday and Sunday with a spe cial banquet and worship ser vice. The banquet will be held the Monticello Youth center Sat urday at 6 p.m. for.all member and friends of the congregation After the banquet a program o singing, introduction of forme pastors and guests and a dis play of Confirmation picture will be presented. The Hev. James Siefkes Minneapolis, a former pastor a St. Paul's, will be the gues speaker for the two worship ser vices Sunday at 8 and a.m. The church was organized a a congregation on Aug. 29, 1923 vith the Rev. Werner Fritsche is the first resident pastor in March, 1924. A small frame chapel was ouilt in 1924 and it was used a, worship qenter until 1931 when he Powers court building was lurchased. The church underwent exten- ive remodeling in 1954, a new larsonage was built in 1958 and a new educational unit in 1965. OUT OUR WAY by Neg Cochran LOOK AT THIS IDIOT, MOTHER; FIRST HE BREAKS AM ARM ICE SKATIMG-AW' NOW HE'S .ShJEAK- OUT, WITH ATOWEL TIED AEOJWDTHE CAST TO SEE IF HE CAKI BREAK THE OTHER ONE.' PIPE PovVJJ, BLABBER- MOUTH; IHEVRE wy .ARMS, AWT THEY 7.' I'LL 6ET YOU FOR THIS.' Council of Catholic Women sponsoring a Week of Prayer i. the Legislators of Iowa. Th Week of Prayer begins Sunday. Faith Incorporated, a sing ing group of Noelridge Par] Baptist church, will present a program at 1 p.m. Sunday a Valley View Baptist church. Carol Wilson, a missionary France under TEAM, will spea at 7 p.m. Sunday at First Cov> nant church. The Concordia college band St. Paul, Minn., will partici pate in a special worship ser vice at Trinity Lutheran church March 2 at 0 p.m. Hillside Wesleyan Sets Dedication Of Education Uni The Hillside Wesleyan enure will dedicate an educational un in the name of the pastors wh organized the church, the Rev Mr. and Mrs. G. M. Hubby, dur ing services at a.m. Sun day. The general secretary of Wes eyan Sunday schools, Dr. C Dale Emery of Marion, Ind., wi! speak on the subject, "Th Twentieth Century Imperative or the Twentieth Century Con Dr. Emery, an interdenomina ional leader, has held the posi ions of district superintenden and general secretary of Wes eyan Youth before being elect ed to direct the ministry of the Sunday schools for the Wes eyan denomination. The congregation purchased a icw home for the parsonage amily at 110 Thirty-first street W and the old parsonage unii n the church grounds was con- erted into an educational unii ast October. The Rev. Mr. and Jrs. Richard Ernst, will hold an pen house at the parsonage 'om 3 to 7 p.m. Sunday. Church Sets Goal To Double Membership The Rev: Sieg Roeskc an ounccd the Cedar Rapids Scv- nlh Day Advenlist church has et a goal of doubling its mem- ership in 1974. He said the members have nade a good-sized contribution their time for such projects local welfare work, 200 ours, and special church pro rams. GOOD NEWS BAPTIST CHURCH 3l8-5HiSt.S.E.-Y.W.C.A. Sunday School 10 AM Morning Worship 11 AM Evening Worship 7 PM Wednesday Biblt Study and Prayer 7 PM al mambors' homos Tor further information Call 365-3334 VETERANS MEMORIAL COLISEUM] CEDAR RAPIDS FRIDAY, MAR. 1 P.M. GOSPEL SING THE DOWNINGS from Naihvlllf, THE 4IMMY PEARCE TRIO from Llttla Rock, Arkamai ADULTS ADVANCE AT DOOR CHILDREN 12 UNDER ADVANCE _ AT DOOR ADVANCE TICKETS ON SALE AT-RECORD SHOP LINDALE PLAZA AND MUSIC DEPT. WOOLWORTH'S DOWNTOWN MAIL ORDERS SEND TO RECORD SHOP, 100 LiNDALE PLAZA AND ENao" Y., born in the Philippines and trained in the U. S.; the Rev. Leon Bolen, Lebanon, Ore.; the Rev. Charles Som- mers, Winfield, and the Rev. John Fahr, a minister from Waterloo suffering from mul- tiple sclerosis. Direction The four are under the di- rection of Chaplain Slriffler and the Rev. David Tuiring, associate chaplain at St. Luke's. The CPE program in Cedar Rapids is one of over 200 across the country, but Chap- lain Striffler said it is the only one he knows of teaching clergy of different faiths and working jointly in a Roman Catholic and Methodist hospi- tal. Mercy hospital joined the program this year and pays a portion of the cost. Previous- 1 y, the chaplain interns worked only in St. Luke's. Use Teaching Three of the current interns, Father Gustilo, Pastor Bolen and Pastor Sommers, are on leaves from their congrega- his training in. a teaching situ- ation when lie returns to the Philippines in September. Pastor Bolen plans to leave the parish ministry and enter the chaplaincy. Pastor Fahr plans to make the chaplaincy his career working with geria- tric patients. Pastor Sommers was ill and unable to be present for the interview. Program Chaplain Striffler said the program began in response to demands from various institu- tions and seminaries. Current- ly, most denominations do not require CPE training for ordi- but do offer courses during a student's training. During the year-long pro- gram, the students attend classes, work in various wards of the two hospitals and have church-related func- tions in the hospitals, such as Father Gustilo's weekly Wednesday evening mass. Pastor Bolen said the chap- 1 a i n intern's day usually begins with pre-surgery calls followed by visiting patients in assigned areas of the hospi- tal. They also respond to emergency situations where a patient or family needs a min- ister. Following work in the hospi- tal, the chaplain interns hear lectures in the afternoon from Chaplain Striffler and other people from the community such as social workers, sur- geons, emergency room staff and those working with drug and alcohol abuse. Confession Pastor Tuiring said confes- sion is a basic part of the chaplain's job. He said the chaplain represents a neutral, non-threatening type of person and can sometimes talk to a person better than the per- son's own minister. The pa- tient knows what he tells the tions. Pastor Fahr is a recent chaplain goes no further graduate of Concordia Semi- since it is unlikely he will ever nary, St. Louis. Father Gustilo plans to use Ministerial Assembly Sel By Witnesses Veterans Memorial coliseum is the site of a ministerial con vention of Jehovah's Wit nesses from Iowa and Illinois today and Sunday. Steve Konjevich, the Wit nesses' district supervisor Iron Brooklyn, N. Y., will deliver th address Sunday at 2 p.m. en ;itled "Be Confident of Divine Assembly activities begin Sun day at p.m. with song am prayer followed by the main address. At p.m. there wil be singing followed by a sum mary of "The by R. A. Ross. At p.m. C. E Villard will speak on "Loyalty n the Time of the Kon- evich will speak again at 4 p.m m "Are You Ready for Life in Sod's New The assem- ily closes at p.m. with song ind prayer. Konjevich will speak Sunday I a.m. on "Dedication and Baptism" prior to a total im- lersion baptism at the YWCA ool for about 75 persons. TRINITY BAPTIST CHURCH 1st Ave. and 5th St. N.E. YMCA Auditorium Sunday School AM Morn. Worship AH Sunday Eve. PM Wed. Nlshl PM Nick Crow-Pastor see the chaplain again. Pastor Tuiring said the chaplain also hears a lot of anger; at the staff for some- thing it did or did not do; al God for'putting him in the hospital, 'or at the family for something that may or may not be related to the illness. Chaplain Striffler told the story of a visit to a patient: "I walked into the room and before I had a chance tell the man who I was, he started cursing about the hospital and the staff. When he finished, I him who I was and he .was very embarrassed. Relationship "After talking to him, we developed a very good rela- tionship. I learned his way of showing his fear for the sur- gery was through his tirade against the hospital." Chaplain Striffler said peo- ple are not as selective about the denomination of the min- ister serving them as they used to bei "Very few people reject a visit by the chaplain. Even those who say they have no religious affiliation are glad a chaplain slops to see he said. Chaplain Slriffler said the THE REV. LOUIS GUSTILO object of the CPE program is 'to teach relationships and hu- manity to [he interns. "Our main job is reaching people. Even though we may not save them in the old sense of the word, we feel we have done something to help them if we can give them an oppor- tunity to clear their con- sciences. Failus c "Unlike doctors, we do not feel we have failed when a pa- tient dies, we feel we have failed only when we are un- able to reach the person and give him the help and under- standing he may he said. Pastor Tuiring said the hos- pital chaplain in no way com-, petes with the local minister, but acts as a supportive ser- vice to him, making calls when he is unable to and re- ferring people to him who wish to talk to him. Pastor Bolen said it was a great relief to get away from budgets, Sunday school pro- grams and administrtive duties after serving as a parish minister 17 years. Satisfying "It is very satisfying to work with the people, a nice change of pace. The human problems are not very dif- ferent in the hospital com- pared with those outside, but access to the patient and the problem is more open in a hospital situation." Pastor Fahr said the most difficult aspect of his work is working with families and pa- tients in the rehabilitation and extended care facilities. He said the most difficult part is getting people to accept the situation and make the best of it. "In those situations, my illness is a great advantage on my part. 1 can show empathy and the patient can accept it because in some ways we arc both in the same shoes. "I came into this program to increase my knowledge so I can help others like others helned me when I had to deal with multiple sclerosis. I know what the worries arc like and I know what I needed at that time. I.would like to be able to help people with their wor- ries and given them support while they adjust to their situ- ations." Communication Father Gustilo said the hard- est thing for him is to work with the residents of Mercy's Hallmar, residential unit for geriatric patients. The hard part he said is communication with people who cannot speak. "It is rewarding to be able to minister, to a patient even if he cannot tell you what he needs. You learn to communi- cate through the eyes and through touch. "One woman was very ill and I did not think she was going to make it. She was un- able to communicate to me but I sensed she wanted some- thing. I laid my hands on her head and said a prayer. When I was done I saw tears coming from her eyes. "The many frustrations of our job 'are overcome by the daily work we do. We know we are always needed 'by someone." Cedar Kaplds 3 Sat., Feb. 16, 1974 Dr. Braaten To Address Conference MT. VERNON A conference on "The Theology and Ethics of he Kingdom of God" will be 'ponsored for ministers and lay- men by the Cornell college reli- ion department Monday on the Cornell campus. Dr. Carl E. Braaten, professor if systematic theology at the -.utheran School of Theology in Chicago, will be the featured speaker. Dr. Braaten will lecture on "The Theology of the King- dom of God" at a.m. and "The Ethics of the King- dom of God" at p.m. Three Cedar Rapids ministers and a Cornell professor will comment on the lectures. The Rev. George Carlson of First uthcran church and the Rev. John Shew of First Presbyterian church will respond to the morn- ng lecture. Dr. David Weddle of Cornell and the Rev. Charles Mehaffey if Asbury United Methodist church will be the afternoon respondents. Dr. Braaten, 45, a native of St. Paul, Minn., received his schooling at St. Olaf college, Lutheran Theological Semi- nary in St. Paul, Harvard uni- versity, and the Universities of Paris, Heidelberg and Ox- ford. Dr. Braaten has published several books and articles and s past editor of "Dialog: A Journal of Conference registration begins at 10 a.m. in the Cornell com- mons and there is no charge for the lecture series. Peace Christian Sets Rededication Service Peace Christian Reformed church will hold a rededication service, marking the first anni- versary of the church'at 6600 C avenue NE, Sunday beginning with the a.m. worship ser- vice. The program will continue with a concert Sunday at p.m. by the Linn-Mar concert choir. 1974 Vacation BIBLE SCHOOL WORK SHOPS to be held In February and March. Call for details. CEDAR BOOK STORE 3519 Tit Ave. SEW Cedar Rapids 366-7189 Roof Raising Pholo by John Mclvor It was a real roof raising Thursday at the Toddville Free Methodist church. The roof and the north wall of the old church were removed from the structure to make way for re- modeling and additions to the church. IGALILEE BAPTIST CHURCH 1947 Washington Ave. S.E. AM Sunday School AM Morning Service Evening Service Wed. Service PM An individual will never be happy until he is submitted to God- ordained authority. This means recognizing human freedom (the authority is self making responsi- ble marriage (husband is the the family (parents ore the and nationalism (law is the Then Christ's -luthority must be overall. Coming To Cedar Rapids.' IN CONGEST! The Bill Gaither Trio and Henry Hazel Slaughter Saturday, March 16 P.M. Veterans Memorial Auditorium Ring Is Touched He many others that will bless and thrill your heart! Come Bo With Us and "LET'S JUST PRAISE THE All Seats Reserved and Advance (500 more at door) TICKETS AVAILABLE NOW AT THESE LOCATIONS: CEORR BOOK STORE THE CHRISTIAN BOOK STORE .Waterloo 3519 1st Ave.SE. 366-7189 529 SE, 363-8697 CEDAR BOOKSTORE CeclorRciplds Cedar Rapids 614 Sycamore, 234-7715 MAIL ORDERS FROM: CIcirMuo Pluilrcu, P.O. Box, Alexandria, Indiana <16001 DONT MISS THfS GREAT PLAN TO COME 'AN EXPERIENCE OF UNITY' WE NEED TO COME TOGETHER All Saints Church Mt. Vernon Rd. and 29th St. SE Sunday, February I7 PM SPONSORED BY UNITED   

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