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Cedar Rapids Gazette Newspaper Archive: February 12, 1974 - Page 1

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Publication: Cedar Rapids Gazette

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   Cedar Rapids Gazette (Newspaper) - February 12, 1974, Cedar Rapids, Iowa                                Weather- i Fair tonight lows 25 to 30. Sunny, mild Wed- nesday, highs lu 40s. VOLUME 92 NUMBER 31 CITY FINAL 10 CENTS CEDAR HAPIDS, IOWA, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 12, 1974 KIDNAPERS: FEED ASSOCIATED PKESS, UPI, NEW YORK TIMES Teleohoto ENERGY CONFEREES President Nixon hosts a White House dinner for delegates to the ih- ternational energy conference. He is shown chatting with Walter -Scheel, left, West German foreign minister and president of the Council of Ministers of the European Communities, and Mitchell Sharp, Canadian secretary of state. Caucus at Oil Talks Supports U. S. Author Is Arrested By Soviets MOSCOW (UPI) Police Tuesday took author Alexander Solzhenitsyn into custody after he defied a second summons from the slate prosecutor's of- fice, friends said. Four plainclothcs and several ur went to his lion p.m. and esco prosecutor's of said. It was not kn any resistance. "Terribly Rough" Solzhenitsyn's i Irs. Svetlova, sai eight policemen, erribly she said. "They told him he was aken in connection with vesligatibn of an importar of the state prosecutor." Mrs. Svetlova sail :er, Nalalya, answei Tuesday afternoon. Subpoena for Nixon Goes Astray in Mail LOS ANGELES (AP) The U.S. Postal Service is trying lo trace a missing registered letter containing a 'Los Angeles judge's subpoena for the testi- mony of President Nixon. The subpoena, mailed by Judge Gordon Ringer's clerk on Feb. 4, had not arrived in Wash- ington, D.C., superior court by oral officers, they acted legally in connection with the breakin while they were members of a White House investigative unit known as the plumbers. Ellsbcrg, a former govern- ment researcher, leaked the se- cret Pentagon Papers study of U.S. involvement in Indo-China to the news media. Of Victim BERKELEY tapc- ccorded voice of kidnaped ewspaper heiress Patricia earst assured her family Tues- ay that she was well. Gazette Leased Wires WASHINGTON Eight of the nine European Common Market countries decided Tuesday to support a U. S. proposal for a conference on the cost and shortage of oil between Arab oil states and oil-importing nations of the world. Only France, which has pur- sued a. go-it-alone policy in deal- ing with the Arabs and wants to buck the energy issue to the U.N., disagreed with the Com- mon Market position. 'The other European states, at a caucus preceding Tuesday's final session of the 13-nation Washington energy conference, agreed to back Secretary of State Kissinger's call for inter- national cooperation unity of action. "Political Issue" "It .is more than a procedural dispute, it is a political said Helmut-Schmidt, the West German finance minister at an impromptu news conference. Schmidt declined to elaborate, saying that he was "under some restraint" not to discuss public- ly the wide gap between France and the other eight Common Market countries while there was still some hope of compro- nise. Italian Finance Minister Ugo La Malta said his country is op- posed to bringing the energy issue before the United Nations as proposed by France and Al- geria. There is no point in dis- cussing the energy problems in the presence of countries which have no energy problem for the time being, La Malfa said. Cooperation The U.S., represented by Kis- singer and Treasury Secretary Shultz, is pleading for complete cooperation and promising -as- sistance to its friends and allies who are far more dependent on Arab oil than is this country. Michel Jobert, France's foreign minister, does not want to hear of such close coopera- tion which, he contends, is im- possible because the'U. S., a major oil producer, cannot be compared with other countries School Board To Seek Million Bond Issue By Judy Daubcnmier A million bond issue lo remodel the district's four older junior highs was approved by the Cedar Rapids Community school board Monday night. The board cautiously agreed to put the matter before voters without including air-condition- ing for the classroom areas of the buildings. Staff members were instruct- ed to work with Frank Bar- vinek, co-chairman of a citizens Other School Board Stories on Pnge 7 planning committee for remo- deling the four schools, to circu- late petitions asking for a bond election. About signatures arc needed lo call for an elec- tion. Million Cut By deleting air-conditioning from the classroom areas of the buildings, the cost of the remo- deling was cut million from the original million estimate. The central core of all four buildings will be air-conditioned because areas such as the audi- torium and instructional media centers will be Today's Chuckle A bargain is something thnt would cost a lot more if you "hod nny use for it. coovncmi Air-conditioning could be added to Ihe classroom areas later. "Although I prefer to have the entire said board member Steve Severn, "I be- lieve our best bet (for passage of a bond issue) lies in deferring the air-conditioning." The million figure for remodeling Roosevelt, McKin- ley, Wilson and Franklin in- cludes remodeling the physical education and locker room areas, the auditoriums and in- structional media centers, cafe- terias, small gyms, classrooms, corridors, floor coverings, site work, and improvements to the heating planls. Others New The district's other two junior high schools, Taft and Harding, were built in 1965. Passage of a ?7.8 million bond issue 'would raise the millage rale about one mill ncxl year, but after that the millage rale would decline because previous bonds will be paid off in a few years. if Ihe bond issue is passed, remodeling could be finished in the fall of 1977, school officials estimate. Without a bond issue and using 2.5 mill money, remo- deling all four buildings would take 12 or 13 years. No date was set (or n vote on the measure. A CO percent ma- jority will be required for pns sage. that have to import every drop of oil they need. Jobert, in an uncompromising speech, Monday said that Europe must be free to tackle, the'' problem and that it was "not desirable to establish a sys- tem of preliminary consultations wjth the other big consuming such as the U.S. He also Kissinger on another point. Kissinger asked for "agreed rules of con- duct" in dealings with the pro- ducers. The consumers, Jobert said, should not try to define a 'new code let us not seek to establish or to impose a new world energy order." "Coordinating Group" Kissinger suggested the con- ference set up some follow-up mechanism he called it a "coordinating group" but Jo- bert did not like this idea either. "France, for her part, would not guarantee such a structure, be it working' groups, an action group for he said. Kissinger, as many times be- fore in. speeches and press con- ferences, again was critical about bilateral deals such as Jobert concluded in two recent tours of the Middle East. "The only result of un- managed bilateralism will be to bid up prices perhaps even beyond present levels, and to stabilize them at levels that will ruin lhex countries making the bilateral arrangements before they ruin everyone Kis- singer told the conference. A few hours later, at a While House dinner for the ministers, President Nixon backed up Kis- singer on this point. It might be good politics to make such deals over the short term, "but over the long term it is bad states- Nixon said in his toast. Jobert in his conference speech said there was nothing wrong with such bilateral ar- opened she saw many men there were. "They told her Mrs. Svetlova. rangemenls, and he was sup- Today's Index Comics .....................10 Courthouse ..................3 Crossword ..................19 Daily Record ................3 Dcnllis ......................3 Editorial Features...........G Farm ......................13 Financial ..................20 Marion......................21 Movies .....................18 Society ......................8 Sports ...................15-17 Television ...................9 Wnnl Ads ................22-25 ported by Britain's Sir forced their way into Douglas apartment, she said. Svetlova -said the po Left cut her telephone lins But in his firm leaving. She called news against the from a public telephon OU'sidC unexpectedly was left many .of his colleagues in Common. Market were far under attack a sympathetic to the traitor for publishing "Th Gulag his new book on Stalinis Schmidt strongly terror, had been sum the "scramble for to appear at 10 a.m. a the bilateral arrangements Jobert and; to a lesser extent office of state prosecutor A Balashev, but he had willfullj the British concluded '-in the. summons. weeks. He joined Kissinger in warning that "we. must by Nobel prize winning author had also ignored an eariie means avoid a relapse into bi-lateral bartering, individual overbidding, competitive devaluations, or escalating trade to appear Friday There was no immediate indica tion why Solzhenitsyn was want ed for questioning or how strictions and Page 3, Col. 4.) Truck Traffic Near-Normal By Associated from Washington that Produce and meat were shutdown was not over. ing into the nation's majority of the owner places at expected paces have not gone back t day as the ovcr-lhe-road Rynn said on the NBC ment of freight by. "Today" program truck drivers returned lo large number of compan withheld in the terminal There were continued reports of holdouts who were not this thing are now bac on the road. This is the reasoi favor of ending the 11-day, violence-marred shutdown. B u t they were in a small increase in traffic, not th One strike leader in Florid predicted many of the driver And others among had returned to work woul persons again. He claimed the si idled by the shutdown freight surcharg fuel prices and freight drivers was not enough wcnl back to said drivers had only re Truck traffic was described to work to replenisf being between 80 and 100 pocketbooks. cent of normal in the at major marke hardest hit by the strike. warned consumers stil violence had almost ended, face higher prices am a few scattered shooting supplies for several days dents there was no mistaking tha In Ohio, Gov. John return to work had been ac deactivated Ohio guardsmen after 10 days' duty and in West Virginia, Gov. Arch Moore announced a Military deactivation" of troops in a five-county area in the Bombec part of the CHALFONT, Eng Several of the smaller (AP) A bomb explodcc of independent reversed a Brilish military collcgt rejection votes Monday, and injured 10 persons others scheduled new voles of them seriously, (he armj Tuesday and Two women were amoni casualties George Itynn, president of Independent Truckers, maintained in n broadcast army spokesman said the explosion erupted in the record office of the Latimer Nationa college in woodec Joblcss about 30 miles west o OTTAWA (UPI) The blast was causct adjusted unemployment in an estimated 50 pounds o ada increased in January by percent lo 5.5 percent, blamed Irish lei Canada reported luuer accompanying me oft, strained voice demanded ncd officers ortly after 5 him to the the friends if he judge said, "I'm rendered speechless." "Not Normal" Los Angeles Postmaster James Symbol said such a Offer Of Subsidies LONDON (UPI) Leaders food for California's poor nd aged. The Symbionese Liberation Army, which has claimed re-lonsibilily for kidnaping the 19-'ear-old coed on Feb. 4, said in in 'delivery of registered mail "is not normal at all" striking mine workers unanimously letter she was abducted "for rimes her mother and father he was ordering a trace offer by wealthy committed against the there were 'They were e said, e was being with an letter. Ringer issued the order for Nixon's testimony at the request of the President's former top domestic adviser, John to pay to end their national strike. A union spokesman announced the' unanimous vote after a three-hour emergency meeting of the 27-man people and the people f the world." Her father, Randolph Hearst, s president and 'editor of the an Francisco Examiner and portant of the coal of the Hearst Corp. document asks Nixon in mother, Catherine, is a re- d her at a hearing Feb. 25 offer came from of the University of Califor- retf tne the trial of Ehrlichman a director of the other former White Mercantile Corp., who threat rV tnc same light the two a asked G. Gordon Liddy and David Young on April was raising a million 'und from businessmen and the tape sent to Berkeley adio station KPFA, a black ere. i d d y s attorney, Charles Sessler, raised the possibility :hat the Feb. 25 hearing, It would pay the miners an extra a week in addition to the raises identified only as "Sing" aid he was "quite willing to zhenitsyn ap-loor and the heir way into to be. postponed if the subpoena is not found and deliverec soon. The White House has to a week the Nationa Coal Board can pay them without violating Prime Minister Edward Heath's anti-inflation out execution of your daughter to save the starving and exploitations of thousands of men and 'women of all "aces." said the will resist the order elephone but it. is likely that and Dad, I'm called Angeles hearing would fund would the slow, deliberate voice lie until, the "matter of hi possible appearance is payments, in anticipation .6 the increase above the Miss Hearst. "I think, you can really tell I'm riot tcr- a spe'ciaPjjay "boariJ is .-.or Inesc peo- er attack as lishing "The his new on Stalinisl been sum-at 10 a.m. The Washington clourt, under the uniform code covering out of-state was to hold a hearing on the matter following receipt of the subpoena. The Washington court could to award the miners. Bu the government refuses to se up the board until the miners g back to work. Heath's Conservative government, which called the have been very honest with me they are perfectly willing to die for what they do I want to get out of here but the only way is if you do what they say, and do it uuickiv." prosecutor the subpoena served 28 in an attempt to had against the miners, really up to you to make Liddy and Bradman's plan those people can't jeopard- winning au-ed an charged with burglary anc conspiracy in the 1971 And it feared it would have an adverse effect on my life by charging in and doing stupid she added. ear the office of Daniel election not being tried for crimes ediate Ehrlichman also mine union official not responsible for. I'm yn was with that it showed because I'm a member of or how men contend that, as not command the ruling class family." n pAl A of his own supporters captors said that, before d, L01. nppntifltp for IVIisc c" uusiness and tinancial com ucgULlalc- IU1 ivuas ncdlal a release, her family 'must supply Rail worth of 'free meat, vegeta- and fruits for every needy a move to improve over a four-week (UPI) chances of the Labo party, Heath's chief beginning Feb. 19. highway patrol 'railway engineers Demands lington team Tuesday, was Monday night to call letter said this is not not circumstances of an Page 3, Col. Page 3, Col. 4.) the which resulted in the gone back to on the NBC a young Muscaline man dur ing a chase. Jose Falcon, 22, of r of company the killed on highway 22 .abou 10 miles west of for U.S. are now Tuesday after the car is the driving went out of Frank Nye affic, not a sharp curve and MOINES The word is in a field shortly after around this capitol city that jr in the passengers in the Republican race for the seal o work Harold Hughes is vacating aimed the Des Moines, a the U.S. senate may have a McCartney te the state department of candidate before long. s not safety said a "formal story goes thai State Sen. iad only would be made on McCartney to surrounding is just waiting for Gov. Ray to make his lajor Commissioner known before nsumers said a veteran or not lo enter the "caught fire" with the prices Falcon's car faithful. several miles an hour in a is conceivable, of 48, is a' lawyer nistaking zone. He said the McCartney might be served two terms in the iad been Falcon's car and had of the governorship if house in 1967-71. He was around in order to follow Hughes' lead majority leader in The case, Molctz itary ombed .FONT, "a couple miles down the road when lie (Falcon) missed a curve." Holctz said investigating troopers would interview from politics. But the betting is that Ray will try for an unprecedented fourth term as governor. His decision is expected later IIL iid i out i wo and was elected to the slate senate in 1972, beginning his service in 1973. Like Milligan and Stanley, McCarlncy has (he respect of mib exploded college d 10 persons, sly, the injured passengers, bu added that because of the dis lance between the patrol ca and Falcon's vehicle when who only last week Icl it be known he won'l be a candidate for his fellow legislators. Many Republicans among them and in the parly organization felt that a good primary contest for sen- were began, Falcon "may no have known that the for congressman from the Third district, would strengthen the GOP, when its fortunes appear at a nan said behind him and might to be interested ebb due lo Watergate, for n the the curve showdown battle with Con- ner is believed to be John Culver of Cedar in from the probable Democrat- miles west (AP) The who llilnk ncllher of nominee. was government candidates for is unopposed so far in 50 pounds tax officials Tuesday as for U.S. senalor quest for the Democratic a campaign against Sen. George Milllgnn for senalor and In cd Irish President Chung lice Molncs and Stale expected to see formidable last Stanley of Muscaline nt the party primary.   

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