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   Cedar Rapids Gazette (Newspaper) - February 10, 1974, Cedar Rapids, Iowa                                C. R. Weather High SatunJiiy 11 p.m. Saturday 18 Rainfall None Total for I'Vh.........Trace Normal for Kcu. 1 03 Normal through Total for 1974 Baronietcr, falling .......29.98 Humidity at 11 p.m. Sat. .77% Wind direction and velocity at Gazelle weallier station 11 p.m. S at 12 mph. Sun rises Sunday, sun sets, Year Ago Today High, low, 12; rainfall, none. Births Mercy Fell. 8 To Ihe familH of Francis Schmidt, Norway (laughter; Thomas llamlklrd 3117 Bever avenue daughter. Feb. 9 Mr. and Mrs liwayne Ilansini, 2010 Gins road NE, a daughter. Births Si. Luke's Fell. 8 To the families o Doudas Meader, 338 Sixtl avenue, Marion, a daughter Donald M. B a i 1 e y, 243C Twenty-seventh avenue, Mar- ion, a daughter; Mrs. Katlij Picrson, 1509 B street SW, son. Feh. 9 To the families o Daniel Moses, 1415 Fifth ave nue SE, a son; Mrs. Arlaine Snell, 1625 Country Club drive Marion, a son. Out of Town Births At Itancho Cordova. Cal. Mr. and Mrs. Richard DcBacre a daughter Feb. W. Mrs. De- Bacre is the daughter of Mrs Wayne Bartlett, 718 Thirty- second street NE, and the late Wayne Bartlett. Deaths City Mrs. Marii Winter, 75. Services Monday a at St. Patrick's church Hosary.at Sunday at Don ohue's, where friends may cal after 3 Saturday. Manchester Elmer Lammers, 63. Services Tues day at St. Mary' church. Rosary Sunday at wake service Monday at Shclly's, where friends may cal after 3 Sunday. Joseph A lil. Services Tuesday, a.m., lirosh chiipel in Cvtlai It.-iliicls with burial in Ander- son cemetery -near Swisher Friends may call at the Brosli chapel Monday. Tliituu ElinalwUi K. si'cker, Cremation at Ce- dar Memorial Chapel of Mem- ories, Cedar Rapids. Memoria service will be held at a latei date. U'hillier Whitney A Franks, 43. Services Tuesday p.m., SprinKville Method it list church. Burial: SpringvilU cemetery. Murdoch's. Hbllc, 62. Services Monday a St. Francis basilica Scripture service Sunday at 8 Kramer's, where friends maj call after 7 Saturday. 'Shellsburc O. E. "Jack1 Nabholz, 77. Services Monday at' 10j Overton's In Indianola Graveside services at cemetery. iMarengo Emrna H. Kraus 81. Services Monday at John Henry Koehn Services Monday at St Stephen's church. -Friend- may call at Turner chapel west Cedar Hapids, until 9 p.m Monday and at the church from 10 a.m. to p.m. Monday. Independence Ben Duffy 94. Services Monday at St. John's Catholic church. Ho saries tonight at 8 and Sunday at 3 and wake service Sunda at 8, White's. Delta Dale E. Hungerford 61. Services Sunday at 2, Reyn- olds in Sigourney. Dysart Amelia Schafer, 85 Tentative services Tuesday a.m., Trinity Unitec Methodist church. Overton's. Lisbon Astrid Holmboe; 86. Services p.m. Tues- day at Morgan's. Visitation 'af- ter 2 p.m. Monday. The casket will not be opened. Onslow John Jansen, 84 Hayden's. Swisher George E. Becic- Whitney A. Franks of Whittier Dies at 43 WHITHER Whitney A Franks, 43, ,a Whittier resident for ten years, died Saturday morning at a Cedar Rapids hos- pital.She was a former resident of Cedar Rapids. She was born Dec. 27, al Flat River, Mo., the daughter ol Robert .and Elirabclh Holmes Dodd. She married Michael V. Franks at Los Angeles Dec. 31, 1952. Mrs. Franks served with the air" force during the Korean war and was active as a leader in Camp Fire Girls for many years. Survivors include, her hus- band; her father; six sons, Mi- chael D., Daniel'R., Jerry L., Timothy A., K. John and Steven K., at home; four daughters, Kilty, Emily, Laura and Rachel, at home; three brothers, the Rev. Daman Dodd, Homervillc, Ga., Lcman Dodd, Flat River, Mo., and Wallis Dodd, St. Louis; and a sislcr, Mrs. Alberta Mc- Combs, Cudahy, Calif. Services: Tuesday, p.m. at Ihe Springville Methodist church by Ihe Rev. dive Cook. Durial: Springville cemclcry. Friends may call at the Mur- doch chapel in Springville after 1 p.m. Monday. DEATHS Wilma V. Spielman Wilma V. Spielman, 73, of 9fll t Oakland road NE, died Satur day evening at a local hospita after a bripf illness. She was born Oct. 27, 1900, in Richland, Mo. She marriec Floyd K. Spielman Dec. 21, 192 in Fairficld. The couple lived in Brighton for several years be fore coming to Cedar Rapids. Mrs. Spielman was a rctirct Kresge's, afte the firm for 21 employe of working for years. She was a member of the Brighton Presbyterian church chapter 486, Order of the East ern Star and Pythian Sisters She was also a past guardian o the Woodman Circle Brighton lodge 151. She. taught in thi White Hawk school near Bright on for four years. She is survived, by a son George, of St. Louis; fivi sisters, three brothers and fivi grandchildren. Services are pending a Turner east. Charles M. German Charles M. German, 60, a former Cedar Rapids residenl died in Davenport Saturdaj morning. Mr. German served as mea manager at A and P stores in Cedar Rapids before moving t Davenport. Survivors include a sister Mrs. Myron Dolph, 356 Fifteent] avenue SW. Funeral services Tuesday a 10 a.m. in the Runge funera home chapel in Davenport. Gr; veside services at 1 p.m. Tues day in Cedar, Memorial park cemetery, Cedar Rapids. lyfemprial Services Snyder, Frederick'Charles Turner east Mon- day by the Rev. William Quil- len. Further services and buria" at Our Saviours Lutheran church in Hastings, Minn., al Ip.m. Tuesday with the Rev. Everett Bexell officiating Burial: Lakeside cemetery a Hastings. Friends may registei at Turner east. The casket will not be opened. Kochn, John Henry St, Stephens Lutheran church, At- kins, at p.m. Monday by the Rev. Robert Stohlmann Burial: St, Stephens cemetery. Friends may call at Turner west until 9 p.m. Sunday and at the church from 10 a.m. -un- til p.m. The cas- ket will not be opened. (Continued from Page 1.) ductions are scheduled within the next 10 days. Iowa Commerce. Commission Chairman Maurice Van Nos- trand said "any reduction' could create hardships for lowans beyond those earlier an ticipaled. Van Noslrand, who forccasl earlier in the week that Iowa will encounter severe shortages in some areas later in February said the stale's molorists have "just got to practice energj conservation and hope people in olher parts of the country prac lice conservation." The other states which wil experience reduced fuel sup- ilics Vew Ohio, Oklahoma, South Dakota .Visconsin and Wyoming. The fuel is being shifted to the District of Columbia, Arkansas Delaware, Illinois, Kentucky, Maryland, Maine, Mississippi tov Jersey, North Carolina, Texas, Virginia and Tennessee. are Kansas, Minnesota Mexico, North Dakota Charge Wells Melton With Theft of Wells Melton, 'II, of 1505 B Irccl SW, was charged with arccny Saturday. Mellon is accused of stealing from Guy Robinson aflcr as- isling Robinson lo enter his oom in the Allison hold. TEAHEN FUNERAL HOME Sinca Marian F. 'Peahen Eldcn R. Rolm MonnriAN ma First Ave. NW Phone NOVAK MONUMENT CO. FINKMI'MOHIALSSINnKIHM 203 14th Avo. SE Pliono 364-4439 Markers, Monuments and Private Mausoleums The Cedar Rapids Gazette: Sun.. Feb. 10. 1974 Clark Outlines 5 Areas Of Concern to Elderly Cedar Rapidi Newt- There arc five areas of prime ccts serving the elderly. The results of Ihe AAA experiences j concern lo the elderly that needl be of great help in formu- continucd attention in congress, ating legislation and instituting Sen. Dick Clark (0 Iowa; said Saturday. Clark spoke al a conference AP wirc-nhcto "That's a Tough One, Chief" Secretary of State Kissenger ponders as President Nixon discusses the Washington conference of major oil consuming nations slated to start Monday. Other top officials also attended the White House Planning session Saturday. Services Tuesday For George Becicka SWISHER George E. Becic- ka, 61, died Friday evening after a short illness. Born June 1912, at Swisher he lived in Cedar Rapids for a number of years but had made bis home in Swisher in recent years. A former employe of Econ- omy Lumber Co., he recently Was employed as a clerk for the Iowa stale liquor commission. He served with World war II the army and was member of the Swisher Ameri- can Legion post, Swisher CSA lodge, Cedar Rapids Traveling Men's club and the Eagles. His first wife, Alma, died Jan. 12, 1971. Surviving are his wife, Eliza- beth Skala Becicka, to whom he was married Oct. 21, 1972; two stepsons, Marvin Skala of Ce- dar Hapids and Robert Skala two step- stepfather, Heabel of Cedar Rapids and a brother, Leonard of Cedar Rapids. Services: In the Brosh chapel in Cedar Rapids at a.m. Tuesday with burial in Ander- son cemetery near .Swisher where the Swisher Legion post will conduct military graveside seryices. Friends may call at the chapel Monday. of Swisher, grandchildren, his C.R. Man Arrested in Prescription Forgery Police arrested Darrell Otis Smith, 39, of 1299 Staub court NE, Saturday, charging him with forging a doctor's signa- ture in order to obtain prescrip- tion drugs. (Continued from Page 1.) provide for greater public em- ployment." He did not expand, and it was not clear if he was referring lo Ihe use of public money lo set up public service jobs. Ford said that "the country as a whole is not going to have a recession. We are going through a period of economic readjust- ment based on the energy crisis. "But once we're over it, in Ihe next month or two, I think you'll see economie conditions improv- ing around the country." Ford warned, however, that unless the Arab embargo ends soon, "we may have no alterna- tive than to have to have gaso- line rationing. "We no not want gasoline ra- tioning. With rationing we might find ourselves standing in line in the post office instead of waiting in line at the gas he said. "But unless the oil embargo ends soon-, we may have no al- Ford said. On Watergate, Ford said he believes the odds are less than 50-50 that-lhe house will report out a recommendation for im- peachment. The vice-president repeated.his belief that informa- tion will'be made .available in due time of a tape that will ex- onerate Nixon of any role in the Watergate burglary or its cover- up. Man Arrested on Three Charges Dennis Dean Daringer, 24, no address, was arrested by Cedar Rapids police on three charges Friday nighl. Daringer was charged w the theft of an electric guitar valued at from' the Bod- dicker School of Music, 317 Sixth street SW, on Jan. 30. He was also charged with de- frauding an innkeeper Jan. 29 at The Pizza Hut, 1620 First av- enue SE. It is alleged he left without paying for his meal. Police also charged Daringer auto theft, by authority ol a teletype from St. Louis re- garding the theft of a car from LaClede Gas Co. of St. Louis be- tween Jan. 25 and Jan. 30. 20 YEARS AGO The state department revealed that it dis- missed only 11 employes for-loy- ally reasons in the past year al- though it listed 534 departures as security cases. (Continued from Page 1.) and that in a stale of war al musl be armed and understant the 'true meaning of self de- fense." It also said: "I believe tha whenever people are confronte( with oppression, starvation am the death of their freedom that they want to fight. There has never been a precedent for a non-violent revolution." It opened with the "To those who would bear the hopes and future of the people, let the voice of their guns express the words of freedom." and like the Hearst kidnap letter, closet with: "Death to the Fascist in- sect that preys upon the life of the people." Colette Photo by Tom AAcrrvn C.R. Truck Damaged Tom Abarr, 2442 Deborah drive SW, looks into tha reason his rig was towed back to the BFC Transportation headquarters Saturday night instead of driven back. Abarr stopped overnight at Hinckley, Minn., Friday on his way back from Duluth. The next morn- ing he found several leaflets on his truck urging assistance with efforts of- independent truckers to get a roll-back of fuel prices. In Josnp, the truck engina quit, and Abarr found that water had boon poured in his fuel tanks. Tho water froze in a transfer lino be- tween tho two tanks, starving tho engine. (Continued from Page 1.) lems, such as our subways and our urban highways, are utilized at maximum capacity for two or three hours during the day, and scarcely at all in the re- mainder of the he said. Environment The President noted the in- creasing attention paid over the last decade to "the effects of our transportation systems on our environment" and said "we must now give equal attention to the need for energy conscrva- on aging Saturday afternoon al Kirkwood Community college, then responded to questions from the audience of about 300. The five areas, he said, are income, housing, health care, nutrition and transporlation. Although there have been sig- nificanl increases in social secu- rity bencfils during Ihe past five years, Clark said, an impressive percentage increase is not a large enough real increase when the original figure was much too low. Planned Rill The senator said he will in traduce a bin ir: '.he ncxl GO days designed to insure that all recipients will have income at least equal lo the poverty level of for an individual and for an elderly couple. In addition, Clark said, a way must be found to supplement he payroll tax as a means of fi- nancing security pro- rams, reached lhe said. Another According to Nixon, the objec- tive of his transit program "is to provide you' with diverse forms of public transportation that take into account the need for transportation without envir- onmental damage, without wast- ed energy, and without conges- tion." In dealing with rail legisla- tion, Nixon said he would send to congress next week a com- panion bill, the Transportation Improvement Act of 1874, "that would authorize bil- lion in federal loan guarantees to help railroads" improve tracks, terminals..and equip- ment. "These loan guarantees are not a signal that'.We intend to provide public handouts to our he said; adding that "they are intended to restore the railroads to a position in which they can once again com- pete economically with other forms of transportation, and therefore support themselves without federal assistance." Nixon said "outmoded and complex federal regulations" had hindered the competitive position of the nation's railroads and that "the collapse of the Penn Central railroad is ample evidence of the wrongheaded- ness of this approach." (reduced in the.nexl 60 days will extend benefits lo peo- 1 c who need prescription drugs. Clark said he would also ike to see coverage for den- tures, eyeglasses and hearing aids. "They're badly needed, and many people are just doing without them because they can'l afford he said. Housing Clark said housing programs are needed to replace and ex tend those ended by Presiden Nixon last year, and that there is a continuing need for trans porlalion for senior citizens particularly in rural areas. Also needed, he said, an more programs such as "meal: on wheels" and congregate meals to provide for the nutri tional needs of the elderly. Many older persons are sacri ficing nutrition in order to pay for housing and remain indepen dent, he said. Praises Aging Agency Clark said the Area Ten Agen cy on Aging (AAA) is recognizec as one of the leaders, nationally as well as in Iowa, in pilot proj Police Seeking Prison Escapee L a w enforcement officers were searching Saturday night 'or an escaped inmate of the slate men's reformatory at Ana- nosa. Police said Thomas E. Smith, !4, escaped from his escort of- 'icer while flic two were at the Roosevelt hole! late Saturday iflcrnoon. Smith is serving a term for into theft. Feed the Birds fall .iriy it with from PERSON'S Your no FIORIST 1800 ELLIS BLVD. NW f-'fffs.S'ff I'rnmpt FIMWKHS i TI> i si 5008 Center PI. Kd. N.U. STEWART FUNERAL HOME 'Formerly Monahari-Stewarf 1.844 First Avenue, N.E. 362-2147 Wo have so many beautiful ways to say something1 special FLORIST and GIFT SHOP 364-8139 phono answered 24 hours ovory day CENTURY BURIAL VAULTS Since 1927 Chiirlcs, llcnrietla, Charles .Jr. I'tichnbradsky 4219 MT. VKIiNON 1111. S.K. 3IM-7478 E. LAPSES flowers Sinco 1909 Convonlonf rfownfown location 308 Jliird Avenue S.f. 365-0511 have almost it he bill that will be in- Bcirbershop Honor To David M. Dicken David M. Dicken, 203 Twenty- "ifth street drive SE, has been selected as the 1974 recipient of .he "Barbershoppcr of the Year" award for his contribu- ions to the Harmony Hawk: Ihorus, local chapter of the SPEBSQSA. The award was presented at he chapter's annual Swecthearl dinner Saturday rloliday Inn. night at the City Briefs (More Briefs on Page 14A.) Scales Stolen The theft of a set of classroom keys and two Analitic balance beam scales valued at each, from Wash- ngton High school was reportet o police Friday. The theft oc- c u r r c d sometime between Wednesday and Friday. imilar projects nationwide, he aid. Clark stressed the need for se- lior citizens to organize in order o present their problems to egislators and administrators. "Nothing is more important, n my he said. Earlier in the program, David A. Affeldt, chief council to the senate select committee on iging, spoke about the duties of he committee and Ihe develop- ment of Ihe Older Americans act. Affeldt, a Cedar Rapids na- ive, has worked with the com- mittee for five years. He said Iowa is considered to be in the forefront as far as supplying information and ideas o Ilie commillee, which he called very important lo the committee's work. "The most valuable informa- .ion we obtain is not in Wash- Affeldt said. Poorer Year He said 1973 was not as good a year as 1972 in the area of leg- slation to aid the elderly. The most significant change, he said, is a two-step raise in social security benefits which will mean a seven percent increase n April and an additional four percent in July. He added, however, that if the cost of living continues to in- crease at the same rate, the will be eaten up by infla- ion before they go into effect. Affeldt explained the Older Americans Taxpayer Assistant act, sponsored by Clark and Sen. Frank Church The act is intended to provide ax advice and aid elderly tax- payers avoid overpayment. Overpay Taxes Experts have estimated, Af- feldt said, that about half of the nation's elderly taxpayers pay more than they are required to pay. Many are baffled by the 1040 form, unable to understand the complex instructions or un- aware of legitimate deductions. Affeldt also discounted criti- cism that too much money is being spent for programs to aid the elderly. "This is something you have earned during your working hours, from social insurance programs such as social securi- he said. The group also heard from Dr. Richard Feller, director of AAA. He discussed the purpose of the agency, how it is funded and how it works with other of- :ices serving the elderly in the seven counties of Area ten. Small discussion groups were also organized on the subjects of he state commission on the Older Americans act, senior employment grants', congregate meal programs, an information and referral program, the office of retirement education opportu- lilies and lhe transportation jrogram for the elderly. Slit (Uriar lajtiJts fertir Established In id publlshei ..ilrd Ave. s 52.106. Second ass Postage paid at Cedar Rapids, Iowa. Subscription rales by carrier 85 cents a week. By mall: Night edition and Sunday 6 Issues a month, S24 a year: Atternoon editions and Sunday 7 Issues 52.50 a month, 525 a year. Other states and U.S. territories 540 a year. No mall subscriptions accepted In areas having Gazette carrier service. slvely lo the use ._ _. __________ ll the local news printed in this newspa. as all AP news dispatches. the loca as well Comforting, Warm, Dignified Feeling words, words that families served by the'CEDAR MEMORIAL FUNERAL HOME have used lo describe- candlelit services in the Old English Chapel of Memories. FUNERAL HOME 1st Ave. NE ('.I'lWllTV, I'llMKT Shmi 3113-8000   

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