Cedar Rapids Gazette, February 10, 1974, Page 2

Publication: Cedar Rapids Gazette February 10, 1974

Cedar Rapids Gazette (Newspaper) - February 10, 1974, Cedar Rapids, Iowa WEDNESDAY COLLEGE GROWINGAlternativo, for Vart-Time Student (In Section A) m.vm 'vwta ft' tSTAGE COSTUMES, ANYONE?Opera I heater S(>lls Wardrobe (In Section B) [f~rinififflnn rn •«wtn--iirmnrniwmTirMw iii mn —ii iii mill wm I   if nim i Section A Weather- Cloudy Sunday, highs In upper 20s, chance of snow flurries. Low Sunday night 10-15, high Monday .‘IO. VOLUME 02 NUMBER 32 usmmmt 1flbif Cr cine Hunt da CITY FINAL 35 CENTS NIXON CEDAR RAPIDS, IOWA, SUNDAY, FEBRUARY IO, 1074 ASSOCIATED PRESS. UPI, NEW YORK TIMESTRANSPORT PLAN 'Slight' Cut In Gasoline For Iowans DES MOINES (UPI) - Iowa’s gasoline supply will bo reduced “very slightly” as the government seeks to aid states facing .severe shortages, Gov. Robert Ray’s press secretary, Richard Gilbert, said Saturday. Iowa was included on a list of IO states that will encounter a reduction in fuel supplies in the near future as the Federal Energy Office seeks to adjust the allocation among the states. Gilbert said he was informed of the action by FEO officials. In Washington, federal energy Director William E. Simon said the decision to redirect the Iowa fuel supplies — along with nine other states — was made in an effort to channel additional supplies to 12 states and the District of Columbia where “acute shortages” have been reported. Close Ixxik Gilbert said the preliminary information from the federal agency indicated that Iowa’s: supply would be reduced “very slightly, possibly only I or 2 percent.” Gilbert said he was informed that an official announcement on the exact reduction would be made in Washington Monday. Gilbert said Ray and his fuel advisers would take “a good, close look1’ at the federal cutback. “lf ifs a drastic cut, I believe the federal officials will have an unhappy governor on their hands because Iowans have made efforts to conserve fuel,” Gilbert said. Presidenf Calls For SI 6 Billion End to Truck Strike Ac|#£|j fnr Gazette leased Wires    mg numbers Saturday, ap WASHINGTON - President P"ently ending 'he worst of th* .. «.    *£, 'S'pivs Ne»t    year government has met the    legiti    threatened some    industries with ■    I will mate grievances of striking in- virtual shutdowns.    By Richard Lyons ! dependent truckers and de-! Transportation Secretary New ,Yo'k T,m” s*rvic* dared, "Now is the time    to get    Claude Brinegar    said in Wash-    ,hW*S    ~ St,res,i"8 all the trucks back on the    lh„    h,„ m    'he need    for belter mass transit. r().)(j n    ington that reports bung com- president Nixon Sunday pro- Concluding a nationwide radio f «ov“< “ I™* » ^billion federally-address outlining the admin)* t™fkM‘rf,c •"!»*»»». niimna backed program to improve tration’i transportation propos- and M,ch‘8an at ab,,ut 80 10 9(1 rallroads' subwavs and bus als, Nixon said the federal gov- percent of normal on .Saturday. subways lines over the next six years. 'Hie program, which is to be sent to congress next week, would almost double the present annual federal commitment to mass transportation systems. In a companion piece of legislation, the President will ask congress to approve $2 billion in Last Shift upi Teieonoio grievances, Brifdin’s 269,000 coal miners, defying a last-minute plea from Prime Minister Edward Heath, launched a national strike Sunday that could crush Britain's already severely crippled economy. Here miners leave the Dodswortn Colliery near Barnsley Saturday after completing the last shift prior to the midnight strike. The miners are asking for wage increases in excess of Britain's anti-inflation guidelines. Urban Groups Say Nixon Budget Asks Cities To Do More With Less WASHINGTON (API—The nation's local government leaders say President Nixon’s new bud- * i    ,    IL    L-    j    „i    get gives them a lot more re- A spokesman for the Federal h    , v    ,    sponsibihtv    but    less    money    to Energy Office. Jerry Jackson. *    .    *    J said the redistribution would mcc 1 city governments, this budget I heavily dependent on federal would give them less money and state aid,” the county lead- HearstKidnapers Remain Silent on Ransom Demands , eminent has acted promptly “to ^nd he sa'd “even in the find a responsible and just solu-    s*a*es where the slowdown has tion” to what he termed the    been m0}d critical, truck move* i “special hardships” that face    merds today are reported to be independent truckers as a result    aPProaching normal. * | of the energy crisis.    Some    Dissatisfaction The President acknowledged However, pockets of dissatis-in effect that not ail of the in- .    . .    .    ,    ,    ,    faction were apparent in some dependents have accepted the     ________________T. _____ solution negotiated here this v s rejecting government fe(jera| |oan guarantees to the week in government-industry    pledges to freeze fuel prices, | nation’s    railroads    for    capital    in- j conferences. Then he added a    and scattered violence con-    vestment    in    facilities    and    equip- note of warning    to some of the    tin Lied.    ment. He made the proposals in strikers:    Mike Parkhurst,    editor of    a live radio address from the “In no instance will we toler-    Overdrive magazine,    said gov-    White House, ate violence from those with eminent proposals to end the j Some of the $16 billion that he said. “Thoseistrikc were ‘‘unworkab,e” and the President is seeking ap-u iu nu lr .u i    termed talk of an end to the parently would be earmarked who willfully break the law can wa|gout -a giant smokescreen.”; for the operating expenses of expect no sympathy from those,Parkhurst predicted the walkout mass transit systems. who enforce the law. We intend would continue to enforce the federal laws, and ^ ^ey group in Pennsylvania,    ^^es’ ^Rie* we will give state and local of- Pittsburgh chapter of the Nixon said that two-thirds of t lei ells the assistance they need fraternal Association of Steel lh® fd® billion “would be allocate enforce their laws.”    Haulers (FASH), voted over-(’d to state and local govcrn- Praises Teamsters    whelmingly to return to work.    ments for application in areas wanted to em    The Cleveland chapter of    where they believe this money wanted em    FASH a|so acccp,ed    |he p|an    can be spent most effectively.” Nixon said he p h a s i l e that “despite threats of violence from a hand- but ,b(‘ KmoP® Franklin, Ohio, and more responsibility," the ers said. "Many of these pro- Thc (a(hcr flf k|dna d    sajd: cities analysis said.    grains, particularly in thc bring the 12 states and Washington, D C , closer to their original allocations. He said the move grams, particularly in ...v.    . . n    „    .    ...    . .    a u • The difficulties lie in    the I health and social service areas, I    J!" heiress Pat^.a    Hearst sa.d    I    want to    commend tho,,. ani cullies ne in uie    e,v    to    he    iriven    •»    hinh    Saturday    he    hoped    the    con-truckers and all of their leaders, budgets ordering of priorities,    !erp^rityif the administration Itinued silence from    his    dough-1    such    as Frank    Fitsimmons. who A budget analysis released the sufficiency of resources,    the    |a{(,r decides ^ massive pump    *cr s abductors dld not    mean    heads the country's largest sing Lea- nunc in tho irunciiinn frnm fhr>  :   »>    that    she    H3s    dead.    Ie union, the Teamsters, for agreed to icsume to their responsible actions during ments Monday. Saturday by the National c.ea- gapS in the transition from the j priming ” gue of Cities and the U S. Con oid to the New Federalism, the was not a revision of the origi- [er*nce of Mayors also says the    ri    i-h-moe*    I » .    ,    sweat    it out some more, maybe Dlis period.”    In    east Texas, independent jn bjs state of the Union nal allocation, which was based budget contains disguised im- .    .    Both    reports    praised Nixon s, they want to extend the publici- Nixon reported that many of truckers stalled en masse at address last week, Nixon pro- on supplying each area with a poundments which will give lo in light of inflation and the un- generai concept of revenue- ty. I just don't know.” said Ran- the independents “are already Lane Star announced Saturday pose(j a 50 percent increase in percentage of the amount of ( iil Kovernmcnt programs even | certainty of the flow of funds sharing and a greater voice by jdolph Hearst, president and edi- back in operations and our high-they had agreed to contracts federal assistance to urban fuel used in 1972.    tiinn the budget indicates. tbe cities»» the analysis said j^.yj 0fficials in determiningr°r ^lc San francisco Ex- ways generally are free from vi- with 23 trucking companies and mass transit, for a total of $14 Two Percent    Dispute    Priorities    The    counties’    report    said.    h ‘ fpdpra, mnnov 1- snpnf at amincr and chairman of the olence” because several leaders will be back on the roads by bi„ion He said the supply shifts ..A separate report by the Na- "Despite the over-all increase L,r lcvcls But ,Aey complain- ^ C°rp    °f ^    tr*km    * that she was dead. “Maybe they just want us Nixon said that local officials flit of" desperados, at least" Btl    «Uj.    .^cr was    Si percent of the nations truckers    spent ! "eomtrue.ion of high- Alabama rejected the plan, and wa*vs or Public transit systems, one group of defiant drivers in; purchase of buses or rail Batesville, Ark, named them- cars- selves “the boys who haven’t “This would provide for flexi-given up yet.”    bilify between capital invest* , ...    ments and other expenses,” he n ‘,v,,    added. A White House spokes- Representatives of a major man saJd after the address that truckers group in F lorida the reference to “other ex-itrus ship- peases” meant operating expenses. stayed on the job” after the strike began. Paying a particular compii-BF3RKELFJY, Calif. (AP) — ment to a political ally, Nixon to each area. Thc spokesman said some _ . .___ .    .    .    . . . A. .    .    .    vernment    depends    most    on    fed- states with shortages were not    1 priorities programs ii for hardest on which local would not exceed two percent of ^ional Association of < ounties in proposed spending • -up $30.e(| 0j a new ]oss jn fmKjs |n the the amount originally aIIoe*ated saVs Nixons fiscal 1975 budget billion we still ha\c disagree- prongs. lL “    ”    administration1    ...    ,    .    , The cities analysis also accused the administration of trv-of ourjmg j0 sidestep the controversy which arose last year over im-countics arc p 0 u n (j m 0 n ^ (>f appropriated funds by disguising them this included because they were receiving the amount of fuel originally allocated to them. He could not say specifically how much more or less each state would receive. Jackson said thc redistribution was decided upon after erat help “F’rom the the ments with the £°- on priorities. “Unfortunately, most differences are in the ‘people point of view of programs where Largest Commitment “I certainly    hope    to    God    the    cognized that    the actions taken    And in Tennessee,    drivers In    j reason    isn’t    because    Patty    is no    by the government are    just and    several areas said    Saturday    Nixon said    his    united trans- longer alive ” said Hearst reasonable.”    they    were    cranking    up    their    rigs    potation    assistance    program *    *    *    and at least temporarily ending    *ould mark    the largest federal Independent    truck    drivers    their part in the    10-day-oid    commitment    ever    to the im- Postal Service Fuel Cut Ordered WASHINGTON (AP) — The! Employes were asked to cut speaking from the family home in Hillsborough. “Standing It Well” Hearst also said of his daugh ter: “I would expect she i.‘ year under the label “Budget- standing it rather well.” ary Reserves .    circulated composite “In analyzing the budget,'' sketches of the abductors and Postal Service has ordered its    fuel consumption IO percent be-    the cities’ report said, “the lea-    consulted experts on    radical j    employes to reduce fuel con-    low last year's level by shifting    gue and conference staff identi-    groups. They said many    callers analyzing    fuel    supply    and    ship-    sumption by IO percent and thc    schedules, consolidating routes    fied a $375 million impoundment    claimed to recognize the ment    figures    given    to    the    en-    mileage traveled by Postal Ser-    eliminating unnecessary trips,    in urban highway funds Our    sketches of the kidnaper orgy office by the fuel compa nies. Simon said the impact of the new allocations would probably be felt in the states where rc- <Continued: Page 3. Col. 2 ) jnistal workers. vice vehicles by 2a percent. Seliminating unnecessary idling,staff also found confirmation of jiut an,.nts said there were no Announcing the action Satur-jhmc and similar conservation    HUD decisions to increase thc    ncw    lcad, m ,'hc'kidnaping    and day, the Postal Service said the practices.    impoundment of community de-    the    terrorists who claim    they steps are designed to conserve The 20 percent mileage cut ap-    velopment funds to more than    h<)|{1    Miss Hearst issued no    fur energy without disrupting ser- plies to large vehicles, including    60 percent of those supposed to    ,|HT    uot)i vice or working a hardship on tractor trailers, which generally    be available for fiscal >car voted to return to work in grow- truckers strike. Ford Tells Steps Planned To Cope with Joblessness DETROIT (AP) — The Nixon pared for delivery to a Republi-administration plans to seek ex- can fund-raising banquet, tension of unemployment pro The vice-president, wlw carli-grams to allow workers to re- cr in the day had made stops in( ecive benefit checks for 39 Kalamazoo and Saginaw as part weeks instead of the present 26. °f a day long effort to wipe out Vice-president F'ord said Satur- [he    Republican party s day night operate within major cities. 1974 Oil AAeeting Issues: Price, Supply In an effort to ease the increasing impacts of thc energy crisis, Ford said thc administration also would seek to broaden WASHINGTON (AID - Senior American officials say thc U S objective for the 13-nation Washington energy conference opening here Monday is to assure an adequate supply of energy at reasonable prices with adequate returns for the producing countries. They bopx* that this objective will be agreed upon at the conference and be summed up in a communique after the two day meeting Foreign ministers, finance ministers and trade experts arranged to arrive over the weekend tor the meeting Besides the U.S., others attend ing included Belgium. Canada, Denmark, France. West Germ a n y , Ireland, Italy, J a p a n . Luxembourg, the Netherlands. Norway , the United Kingdom and two powerful economic organizations the Commission of the Fm-ropean Communities and the Organization for FJconomic Cooperation and Development I'resident Nixon met on Saturday with top energy and diplomatic officials to plan for the coming meeting No attempt will he made to set up any binding treaty commitments, but high I S officials say they ho|H* that some ground rules can be adopted to guide consuming nations in getting enough oil. I’he l .S, strongly opposes arms deals or barter arrangements. F’rance has been offer mg arms and aircraft in exchange for oil in separate bilateral deals. And Japan has been offering technical assis stance and economic aid to the oil producers, hoping this would bring favored treatment rile American view put for ward by Secretary of State Kissinger and others is that the I S. is better placed than any other country to deal on an individual basis with thc oil problem. But it is felt strongly that the problem must he dealt with cooperatively and not competitively with other countries. T h e European economic community has been seeking special deals with the oil producers in offers to swap manufactured goods for oil. The U S, plan is first to gam a common understanding of the problem with thc consumers ot 85 percent of the world’s energy, and then meet with the less developed countries and finally with the producer nations in a three-stage solution of the energy problem. Hearst said he ordered the Sunday edition of the San F’ran-cisco Examiner to print in full a five-page, single spaced “Letter to the People” purportedly sent the scope of unemployment pn Jan, 19 by Nancy Ling Perry. She is sought on a $200,OOO arson warrant in a fire at a house police say was a headquarters of the Symbionese Liberation army which has claimed credit being proposed by the adit for the kidnaping.    Ration to allow1 out-of-w<»rk per- - , ..    sons to receive benefits for nine ns k    months instead of six would “This will give anyone who is apply to persons losing their curious about this organization jobs for any reason, provided an insight into it from some- they are covered by the pro grams to allow workers in areas such as agriculture to collect benefit checks if they are laid off Ford said the new provisions body who is a part of it,’ Hearst said. On Jan. 19 the Examiner printed excerpts of the letter in which Miss Perry said “AH members of the SLA recognize that we, right here in Amerikka are iii a state of war (Continued Page 3, Col 5 I grams. Ford remarks were pre fulfill/ * i’hucklv The penalty for bigamy is two mothers in law, ( jpyrigM $500,000 debt, said the unemployment programs being outlined by the administration would be a joint federal-state effort. He said it would include all workers who loose their jobs. “regardless of whether their job loss was caused by the energy crisis ” Ford said a special revenue I I sharing program set up by the administration “provides f 0 t .new public service jobs if states choose to use funds for that purpose.” Setting up public) service jobs with government money has been one prujxisal to ease the unemployment brougiit on by the energy crisis “In Michigan, and nationwide, I there is a ready supply of fe-j deral-state cooperation to meet the crisis,” Ford said. Earlier, F’ord had said Nixon: would be taking “the initiative i for other contingency plans to (Continued: Page 3, Col. 4.1 pavement of public transportation to our cities and towns.” “We have to find ways,” he said. “to use our enormous transportation systems in a more flexible manner.” “In many cases these sy*-- 1 Continued: Page 3, Col. 6 ) Today s Index SiCTION A Lait Newt    I,    J,    M Death*  ..... I City Hall Naif* ........... * tailori«i*  .............. It Accent On Youth    ll Report Caro    lf SECTION B iowa Haw* ....    l    it.    N Reiiitiai Calendar ..... I drank Nya't Political Note*    4 Televi*iOn Tabla Food    > Marion    V ■wilding    ......    11-11 Mona*    U I? Record Renew*    IT Farm       MFI# SECTION C social ........................ f-aa Around tho Town    ....... I Now took*    ..    .    > Travel    ll SECTION O Xtort* ......     17 Outdoor iowa ..    ...    ...    a Fluent.ai ....        t-lt New York Stock* ...    .    I Want Ad*    I MI Crauword    ta da.edo Mahatma    .    I M Cornu*    IE ;

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Publication: Cedar Rapids Gazette

Location: Cedar Rapids, Iowa

Issue Date: February 10, 1974

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