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   Cedar Rapids Gazette (Newspaper) - February 8, 1974, Cedar Rapids, Iowa                                10 Yhi> Cedar liapids Gazette: Fri.. Feb. S. 1974 1Featherfoof Angers Drivers, Saves Gas Wirephoto Jean Calvin of Los Angeles, a professional economy-run driver, checks the mileage computer on her car as she explains her technique for getting tremendous mileage from a gallon of gas. The driving technique she uses has left her with the name "feather-foot." 1.0S ANGELES When it comes to driving eco- nomically, Jean Calvin is a featherfoot. Recently, for instance. Jean aggravated a bus driver in the lane next to her by refusing to slow down or speed up so he could change lanes. He got stuck behind a line of parked cars. Later, a man in a small foreign car became so frus- trated that he resorted to driving on the shoulder of the road to pass her. As a professional economy- run driver. Jean has driven in oil company economy runs. Between driving stints, she free-lances as an automotive writer. The tactics which infuriate the drivers around her are saving her money. Test Roads "You can't be in a Jean 'said. "You've got to steel yourself to ignore the feelings of anyone else on the road." Society Features Presidential Aide, Most Powerful Woman in France Jean recently took a news- paper reporter's 1971 Chevro- let Vega station wagon and drove il 124 miles around Angeles. Unlike many mileage exper- iments are cumlueted primarily on highways, this test included freeways, city streets, hills and busy stop- aml-go arteries. Under her techniques, a car which had been getting 19.98 miles per gallon got 28.74 miles per gallon a 43 per- cent improvement. Avoid Braking The primary rule rcllects why drivers like Jean are called featherfoots. ''Drive as if yon hail a raw egg under the accelerator pedal and your foot weighed no mora than a Jean said. She drove slowly and alertly so as to avoid as much hrak- ing and rapid accelerating as possible, watching signal lights blocks ahead to make sure she would reach them when they were green. "Re- member, it takes more gaso- line to get going than to stay going." On freeways Jean avoided driving in the right-hand lane (though not a recommended practice) so she wouldn't have to make frequent speed change to compensate lor ears entering and leaving freeways. On oily streets she picked her lane according to traffic. "Yon don't want to be in a lane where you'll get stopped by people turning or she said. The newspaper reporter fig- ured that the mileage Jean got out of his car could save about in gasoline bills over Hie course of a year if lie Jlrove 15.0'JO miles. has its Bridge Beginners Duplicate Winners of the Mitchell move- ment played Thursday were: Nurth-soulh Mrs. Kohert Dreckmaii and Mrs. Richard .at, first, and Mr. and Mrs. for fuel economy is one of (he dullest, most ex- asperating methods for get- and Mrs. Pal Howard and Shir- By Aline Mosby PARIS (UPI) An elegant brunette with a flashing smile has emerged as one of the powers behind the presidential throne of France. Since President Georges Pompidou was reported a year ago to have taken treat- ments for an undisclosed ail- ment, Paris newspapers have plotted his possible 1974 retire- ment and mused over the po- litical mystery of who is help- ing run the show. The three right hands of the president at his Elysee offices, according to the political pun- dits, are two men, Pierre Juil- let and Edouardo Baladur and Marie-France Gara'ud. Most Powerful t The French call Mrs. Garaud, 39, "Cardinal Riche- lieu in referring to the red-cloaked counselor to King Louis XIII in the 17th Century. Mrs. Garaud intrigues the French for two reasons: She is prettier than Cardinal Ri- chelieu, chestnut frair drawn back from a classic face with feline eyes and a full mouth, a curvaceous figure. Second, the female member of the "Kit- chen Cabinet" is said by some political columnists to be "the most powerful woman in France." She has not much competi- tion because few women mix in French politics. The minis- tries of health and education have two women deputy min- isters, both devoted to "good works" such as schools and hospitals. Only seven women sit in the parliament. M a r i e-France moves in a man's world of power as the president's ex- pert on domestic and party politics. Discrete The female "eminence grise" walks briskly into the Elysee palace each morning at eight in a fashionable brown leather coat edged with black fur. Elysee sources say from her office near Juillet's she will call political leaders and say, "The president has or- dered me to ask you to come and see.me." She circulates in the halls of parliament, a familiar figure in fashionable dresses, dis- cussing prcsidentially-backcd bills with deputies. Marie-France has a passion for discretion and avoids pub- licity. She lives in an apart- ment in a conservative middle class district with her hus- band, an attorney in the su- preme appeal court, and their two children. Their three- story country house is rich with period furniture and sta- bles of horses for their week- end passion, riding to tile hounds to hunt game. Marie-France was born in Poitiers and she studied law at the University of Poitiers. llouscplant you can grow a lovely avo- cado liouscpliinl from an avo- cado seed. Suspend seed half- way in a glass of water, point- ed end up. Use toothpicks stuck in middle of seed to do this. When roots form and a sprout grows about six inches tall, plant in pot and treat like on ordinary housoplnnt. Telepholo One of the ihree "righf hands" of French President Georges Pompidou is Mrs. Marie-France Garaud, pictured above, an elegant 39-year-old brunette a flashing smile. The female member of the "Kitchen Cabinet" is said by some political columnists to be "the most powerful woman in France." Her first big job was in the of- fice of Minister of Justice Jean Foyer, her former uni- versity professor. She joined Pompidou's office when he was premier. "Hot Line" When Pompidou became president, Marie-France moved to the Elysee as one of five "technical counselors" branched onto his "hot line" telephone. Unlike Cardinal Richelieu, does not behead her ene- mies but fights them in politi- cal congresses. She is now reported working to keep ex- prcmicr Jacques Chaban-Del- mas from succeeding Pom- pidou, with her favorite re- ported to be Agriculture Min- ister Jacques Chirac. A friend quotes Marie- France as saying, "I really am not very important." But the magazine Nouvel Observatcur says. "Today deputies tremble before her. She speaks in the name of the president. She is one of the first personalities of the re- gime. Pompidou is more and more suspicious of his old friends and today she is one of the few persons he listens to." MISS VICKIE SCHROEDER HONORED AT SHOWER Miss Vickie Schroeder, 1302 to the 50 guests were her fiance's grandmothers, sisters and aunts. Miss Schroeder will be married Feb. 23 to Steven Kriz, son of Mr. and Mrs. Ver- non Kriz, Rapids. route two. Cedar 'Child of Future' Speaker Cites Need en Family IOWA rates of school dropouts, runaways, drug abuse, vandalism and violence are a few of the more se- rious manifestations of alienated youth in America today. Family disorganization caused by the pressures and habits of modern society is the one factor which has been found to most adversely affect a child's development toward eventual feeling of alienation, says Urie Bronfenbrenner, professor of psy- chology and of.child development and family studies, college of human ecology, Cornell university. In his keynote address Thurs- day at a conference on "The Child of the being held at the University of Iowa, Bron- fenbrenner proposed changes which might improve our soci- ety's treatment of children and parents. He believes these changes will help to reduce the causes of children's problems by strength- ening family life. Missing Ingredient The missing ingredient in the child-rearing process for many parents is time, commented Bronfenbrenner. He noted that today almost 45 percent of the nation's mothers work outside the home and one out of three mothers with children under six years of age is working. Because of rising divorce rates, twice as many children now live with one parent usually a working mother compared with 10 years ago. Since so many of the-single parents are women, Bron- fenbrenner suggests that "a major route to the rehabili- tation of children and youth in America lies in the enhance- ment of the status and power of who themselves feel alienated. "No single parent of a young child should be forced to work full time to provide an income at or below the poverty state Bronfenbrenner. He pro- poses welfare legislation which would encourage single low-in- Ninth street NW, daughter of come parents to work only part Mrs. Robert Mayer of Belten- dorf, was honored at a miscella- neous bridal shower at Sokol hall Wednesday at 8. Hostesses Bronfenbrenner cited in tests made by attaching a mircophone on a baby's cloth- ing and on his crib, that the average amount of time a child hears his father's voice is 3714 seconds out of every 24 hours. The tests were made in middle-income families; At the higher economic levels the demands of the job, time spent commuting, evenings oul and social and community obli- gations keep parents away from their children, who then seek the constant companionship ol their peers. He deplored the fact 'thai there is a tape available thst talks to children, that "teaches and plays" with" the baby, there- by releasing the parents from an otherwise natural function. Depend on Peers "At every age and level, children today show greater dependency on their peers than they did a decade ago and susceptibility to group influence is. higher among ehil grade a dren from homes in which one or both parents are frequently noted Bronfenbrenner Bronfenbrenner believes the family is "the most humane, effective and economical sys- tem of child care known to and must be supported by society rather than disrupt- ed by it. "Our nation must make am fulfill the 4 commitment to its time and to care for their own families and chjidren before children, time runs said Bron Less Discipline fenbrcnner. Bronfenbrenner pointed "For only in this way will i that even among families which be possible to counteract the are intact and well off economi- cally, research results indicate that parents are spending less time with their children, are less affectionate and offer less alienation, distrust and break- down of a sense of community that follow in the wake of im- personal technology, urbaniza- t i o n bureaucratization, am discipline than they did 25 years] their unplanned, dehumanizing 'ago. Iconsetiucnccs." he concludes. Yes, We Have LECITHIN Granules or Pearls We Mail Order Postpaid MATTESON HEALTH PRODUCTS 116 ISlhST. N.E. 362-73451 Two Locations... TWICE AS MICE! DOWNTOWN 110 ie tower TOWN COUNTRY Shopping Center" premiere showing NEW 1974 THOMAS ORGANS BUILT-IN SYNTHESIZERS with Nationally Known Organist and Recording Slar RALPH WOLF ALSO APPEARING AT OUR OPEN HOUSE Hoar the fabulous new synthe- sizer Organs and hear beautiful sounds unheard of before in a spinet orgon. CARMA LOU'S HOUSE OF MUSIC 3907 Confer Point Rd.NE- 393-31 21 ling "from" Point A to Petal B ley Moore second The .game thai exists." she said. was played at Nocludgc 1 ___________ ______________________ j Christian church. Hie next game will take plate at the church al 1 o'clock Thursday. Woman Ordered To Lose Weight '.Open to the public. MARTINEZ, Calif. (UPII -condition of probation for Miss- West Side Club Gloria Owens--, 26, has been i c' dered lo reduce her weight from! Kaimin explained that a medi-j In a llowell movement played i cal-'psychiatric report concluded'Thursday at Welly-Way winners 2aO pounds to 200 pounds by Jan. jn hcr i a> Mrs her history of writing-Mrs. R. W. Valer, first, and 1, 1975, or go to jail for writing! bail cheeks. Contra Costa county superior court judge Coleman F. Fannin made the reduction a UlUUU tlllll IH-J bad checks. Another condilionl.Mrs. James Slaman and Mrs. J. for the three-year period of pro-io. Schultz, second. The next ballon was that Miss Owens'game is scheduled Sunday at close her checking account. Mb. HEART BOX PECANETTES........... HEART BOX PECANETTES......... 1 SATIN HEART of asst, CHOCOLATES. SATIN HEART....................M Mb. HEART CREAKS................... 2-Ib. HEART CREAMS................... SOLID CHOCOLATE FOSL HEARTS.......... JU-JU GLAZED GUMMED JEL5.Y HEARTS.......Ib. Be Sure to Try Beautifully Valentine Wrapped ANDES FAMOUS Mb. box box VALENTINE CARDS 15< to Wlien you care enough to send the very best Fine Candies MOM. THRU FRI. SAT. SUN. 12-5   

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