Cedar Rapids Gazette, February 4, 1974, Page 9

Publication: Cedar Rapids Gazette February 4, 1974

Cedar Rapids Gazette (Newspaper) - February 4, 1974, Cedar Rapids, Iowa a ca r By Abigail Van Buren DEAR ABBY: A situation in the grade school (grades 1-7) my children attend has caused concern. No toilet paper, soap or towels are kept in the bathrooms. The students must ask for “supplies” from the teacher or the principal. The supplies are kept in each room in a “tote bag” to hand-carry down the hall or into the bathroom adjacent to the classroom. Many students, rather than face the embarrassment of asking for the tote bag, and then bt* seen carrying it. will (I) hold their needs until recess at which time they use the bathroom, without using any sanitary supplies at all or try to wait until they get home at the end of the school day. I approached the principal. He listened patiently, then told me that because iii the past the children had abused the supplies at all or (2) try to wait until they get home at tile end of the school day. My suggestion for implementing a student bathroom patrol and-or new types of dispensers was not readily received. According to the principal, this is not just a local problem. I’d like to know if other schools have found a better solution to this problem. CONCERNED PARENT AUGUSTA, GA. DEAR CONCERNED: We shall see. In the meantime, write to the National Committee For Support of the Public Schools, Suite 410, Wilde Lake Village Green, Columbia, Md. 21044. Also your local chapter of American Civil Liberties Union may he helpful. * *    * DEAR    ABBY:    My    18-y-ear-old .sister has moved away from home and is sharing an apartment with another girl, lf she decides to get married, is it my parents’ responsibility to pay for the wedding? PUZZLED DEAR PUZZLED: Only if they want to. ♦ *    * DEAR    ABBY:    I    am    a    divor cee, trying to support myself and three teenaged children, but in order to be called for employment, I must have a reasonably clear telephone line— and that is my problem. My next door neighbors complicate things. The wife runs up enormous telephone bills calling long distance all over the country, and when her husband gets drunk (which is often) they fight about her telephone bills, and he rips the telephone wires out of the wall. Consequently the wife (and her children, who are teenagers) are over here asking to use my telephone when theirs is out of order. (This is the third time in a month.) Worse yet, they have given my number to every Tom, Dick and Harry, so I’ve been acting as an answering service for people who call them. I ran next door six times last evening to call them to my phone. Celebrity Cookbook Semi-Vegetarians By Johnu Blinn LOS ANGELES ll took a vegetarian to streamline the Supremos according to Mary Wilson, the only one of the orig) aal trio .still with the group “Our producer was such a health nut,” Mary said, “he kept telling us, every tune we’d take a bile of something that wasn’t organic, ‘You're doing your body such harm’ ” The current trio of Supremos looked pretty, Irised and slender as we had a Japanese lunch at Bonihana of Tokyo. Lhrough the years the Kuprernes have changed their figures as    well    as their sound, and they’ve found a semi-vegetarian    diet    an excellent way to hold down the pounds while keeping up the energy. Mary was the first to take her producer’s advice, but with a Japanese twist. “The Japanese,’’ she said, “are one of the few people in the world who eat correctly, lots of vegetables. I also find Japanese don’t overcook food. Their vegetables are almost raw and still they are tasty because of the seasonings they put into them.” Mary, who travels with her dog, Jason, id, “Organic vegetables were not only ex-r pensive, but hard to find in many towns where we were on tour. Hold Down the Pounds Tho Cedar It,nods Gazette: Mon., lob. 4, I f>74 BLINN Soy Sauce And Sake “When I cook,” the Detroit-born singer continued, “I like to experiment to find out what seasonings I’ll enjoy. Right now I’ve gone into a bit of Japanese cooking, using soy sauce and sake to give it flavor.” Mary has fun trying out her Japanese fish-vegctable casseroles on her fiance, Pedro Ferrer. “Berry (the producer) really got me into eating vegetables when he went down to a very slim, muscular guy with energy galore,” chimed in Cindy Birdsong. “And his mind was clean and clear and he seemed so happy all the time. I lost 25 pounds and I’m now much more energetic and feel lighter where, before, I felt sluggish. I’m no longer strictly a vegetarian. I now eat meat, but I’ve found I still eat many more vegetables and fruits than before.” (’indy has not converted her husband, Charles Hewlett, because he’s a meat and potatoes man. “He says he’s going to eat what he wants regardless. However, he doesn’t put me down for doing it because he likes the results.” The Hewletts and their infant son live in Los Angeles. In her own kitchen, she likes to do vegetables in a pot “like a soup or a stew. I make it with all the vegetables I can find, but always fresh. Often I use vegetable seasonings and sometimes I start off with some good lean ground beef.” Still Loves 'Soul Food' Third and newest of the Supremes is Sherry Payne from Detroit, she also likes to cook. “I’m not a vegetarian because I still love soul food — greens and ham hocks, corn bread.” She has no obvious weight problems, and, like her associates, leads an active life. 'Hie Supremes maintain separate lives, but they are very close, and they share a love of tennis, jogging and Japanese food. They usually travel with a juicer because “really fresh” orange juice is often hard to find in hotels and restaurants. They create terrific health drinks, combining carrots, celery, honey and fresh lemon for a quick pick-me-up. Even when they’re performing, the Supremes cook. For example. Cindy’s stew. “What we really love,” Cindy said, “are beautiful vegetarian hot plates made with broccoli, Brussels Tho Supremes: (left to right) Sherry Payne, Mary Wilson, Cindy Birdsong They’ve found a semi-vegetarian diet is an excellent way to hold down the pounds while keeping up the energy. sprouts, cauliflower, green beans, asparagus, in fact all kinds of fresh vegetables, lightly steamed.” Recipes from Mary and Cindy’s personal cookbooks follow: Cindy's Stew I large onion, peeled, chopped I tbsp, vegetable oil I large potato, peeled, cut in small cubes 3 large ripe tomatoes, peeled, chopped 1 cup cauliflowerettes Mi cup celery, thinly sliced Mi cup turnip (or parsnip) grated 2 carrots, peeled, coarsely grated I cup liquid: cooking juice reserved from vegetables or I vegetable bouillon cube dissolved in I cup boiling water lA cup chopped fresh parsley Freshly ground black pepper to taste Sea salt (or soy sauce) to taste Mi cup fresh green beans, thinly sliced I cup zucchini, thinly sliced Mi cup cabbage, shredded Saute onion in oil in a large stock pot. Add potato, tomatoes, cauliflower, celery, turnip, carrot, liquid, parsley, pepper and sea salt (or soy sauce). Cover, cook until potatoes are almost tender (add more liquid if necessary). Add green beans, zucchini and cabbage, cook quickly until cabbage is barely tender. Taste to correct seasonings. Serve as main course, spooning stew into large plates. Serves 4. AFTERTHOUGHTS: Cindy often adds meat to the stew, using lean ground beef, browned with onion in the beginning, and in this case, omitting the oil. Drain off excess fat before adding vegetables. Oregano, basil or thyme make nice additions. For vegetarian protein touches: garnish stew with toasted sunflower seeds, julienne strips of cheese (or grated Parmesan cheese) or chopped hard-cooked egg. Mary's Fish Casserole I lb. fresh fish (filet of sole or red snapper), cut in pieces 3 carrots, sliced (pre-cooked in small amount of water until barely tender) 1 cup celery, thinly sliced 2 cups cooked rice (brown, preferably) 2 scallions, green part only, chopped Tamari (or any good soy sauce, to taste) 2 tbsps. sake (or rice vinegar) Handful chopped parsley I large ripe tomato, peeled, cut in large pieces Lightly oil a baking dish. In a mixing bowl, combine fish, carrot, celery, rice, scallion, tamari (or soy sauce), sake (or rice vinegar) and parsley. Toss lightly, place rice-fish-vegeta-ble mixture in baking dish. Top with tomato arranged like a flower on the top. Bake in preheated 400 degree oven about 30 minutes (or until fish flakes when tested with a fork) and top is nicely browned. Serves 2 or 3. Older Homes Often Need Wiring Work IOWA CITY - If you’re living in an older home chances are good that you need to have an electrician renovate the wiring, suggests Everett Alton, associate professor of electrical engineering at the University of Iowa. Symptoms of inadequate wiring: —Fuses blow or circuit breakers trip open frequently. —Heating appliances such as toaster and iron are slow to heat. —Lights dim noticeably when I you turn on appliances. —Television reception is unusually bad when appliances are in use. —You need to disconnect one appliance frequently to plug in another. When your electrician puts in new wall outlets, make sure that he installs three-wire outlets with a third “ground” wire extending back to the fuse box or circuit breaker box, Alton advises. Then you can connect to (them appliances with threepronged plugs (the three prongs fit into the three holes of the outlet). This will “ground” the appliance when in use, preventing ! shocks from appliances in confact with plumbing fixtures, grounded metal surfaces or damp earth. All outlets in new houses must be the three-wire type- Other suggestions: —Wall switches should be enclosed in metal boxes to keep fire from starting from possible sparks as the switch is turned on or off. — Brass shell sockets in bathrooms or basements may cause shocks if they become defective. Use sockets of Bakelite, porcelain or rubber in such locations and especially on extension cords used outdoors. —You might ask your electrician to check the possibility of installing a ground fault interrupter on appliances such as washing machines and driers. This new device shuts off the voltage to such an appliance when a small amount of current flows through a human body to the machine. Use Caution When Buying Place in Sun' When the mercury I ices and plans for industrial and .to pay. But this money can later AMES -drops and heating many of us yearn “place in the sun.' often, people cation or retirement cover that “Rainbow Estates” is in the middle of a desert or swamp. “Many out-of-state promoters come to our state. And Iowans costs rise, for that But tool who invest in va-and residential development. You may be invited to a free dinner or on a trip to the proposed site iii return for lbs- vour attendance at a slide presentation or sales talk. But while the promotion may be alluring, costs for these activities are absorbed into the cost of the land. While it is possible to take be used by the seller as an in- Are Full on the Top Full on top, slim below or vice versa. That’s the “fashion this spring. Big-skirts don’t centive to get you to buy. So if you might want your money re- math turned — get a receipt and writ- are familiar, but designer ten provisions for return of the | dictate payment if you so request. And if developers offer you financial aid to buy the land, compare their terms with interest rates asked by other lenders. Shop around tor your credit. plenty makes EASY BEEF GRAVY For an easy way to liven up those everyday meats try sweet-sour beef gravy. In saucepan. cook one tablespoon chopped green pepper in one tablespoon butter or margarine until (10Mn 2 cup really drained crushed pineapple, one any more; they give us tender. Stir in one can of alternatives. What ounces.) beef gravy, the “big” look new is the light, un-cumbersome tablespoon brown sugar, and fabrics. The big top flies free two teaspoons lemon juice. have been bilked out of thou-ja(jvan^agC 0£ these “free*’ offers sands of dollars buying land jarKj j}len r(qrajn from buying, sight-unseen.” says Karen Hull, jt takes strong sales resistance extension consumer specialist at I And developers may ask you to C"t"    in    i,.iv Iowa Stall* university. /'Many provide -earnest money" to in-  ..... U*'    July> because of their great jdicatc over pants and slim skirts, day Heat; or evening. The soft new’ dresses and stir occasionally. Serve over pork, chicken, or ground suits beef. Makes about I Vt cups. W hat has LO lejzs, lives in a house-trailer, climbs trees, eats pizza, and jjoes home with you in a paper hajj? (SII THIM NOW) HARDI-G ARDENS •'WOI FIRST AVE. SF Iowans respect for the value of land — seem particularly vulnerable to land sale schemes and .swindles.” Free Dinner But buying land is a sizable) investment for most persons, so your real interest. Get Receipt To further protect Iowans in are a welcome change from all and transactions, a tough new the classics and pants we’ve seen. Pants aren’t out. But requires out-of-state developers those who are longing for a new to make all sales through Ii- dressed-up look that s supercensed Iowa real estate brek- feminine are really in luck this Many jiersons feel obligated ers. spring. The only glimmer of hope in,    ....    a this whole* mess is that they al|i,h‘>    ■*    «    "P™1 ,*„.,a IWAI1 A DBV    some    time    and    money    to    make ABBY, so please    V    . will realize Isure the ProPcrty ls Ul»'t,luhlk read DFAR print this so they what an imposition they have! . .,    ,    *,„ .    ...    ;    .    ■    J    ...through    the    mails,    after    a    slide been, without my having to tell , h ....  ,i.....u,.„„ Never buy land sight-unseen - them. Thank you. DEAR MRS. DING: show or even over the phone |“But see it before signing and MRS. DINGALING ask ajj attorney’s advice.” Here’s Learn the zoning and condition your letter. Let’s hope the man of die properly and adjacent next door doesn’t newspaper. rip up the and. And find out present and I proposed roads and utility serv Momingcap. An VV.*-....... I    <    h.isvr    -'MV    In    twin    M    .my    mills,    i.    tmiis ..I th.-ni'ilitM'.i'- SII,mill! O' '"'*'ilIll'll   hnh Willi tnni.ttii juice /of a lefieshiM'i t im kiatl I IV I rank s Kraut Juic e healed with« Moberly sam e. loo. as .i fanny turkey «|ln/e. I HANK’S, lo your health I ooh fur Frank’* Quality Kraut in «ans and jots on your t|io« el * *helve*. Hall’s will be CLOSED FOR INVENTORY TUES, FEB. 5 Visit Hall s Wednesday for INVENTORY BARGAINS . . . See Wednesday's advertisement in The Gazette for these bargains. HALL HOME FURNISHINGS “A. valentine changed my life (and my name).” Mary Ann Chervenak-Port Monmouth, New Jersey “I ast year my boy friend sent inc a valentine with a gift certificate to Plaine Powers. I didn’t know how to take it. But I went. I hat w as twenty pounds and two dress sizes ago. I also lost my fear of bathing suits and the nickname f ats.’ \\ hen I reached my ‘dream size,’ a 7.1 think the instructors were as happy as I was. This year I married the guy.” When a body nerds a friend (al a prier any body can affords Elaine Powers Figure Salons n per month. Complete 4-month program. I nlimitrd visits. ink’tfsl. No iittnu.tl |'i **.lilt,im rn Call today for your free figure analysis. Mon. thru Fr. 9 AM-9PM, S oturday 9-4, Town & Country Shopping Center PHONE 364-9909 or 364-9929 ;

  • Abigail Van Buren
  • Charles Hewlett
  • Cindy Birdsong
  • Everett Alton
  • Johnu Blinn
  • Karen Hull
  • Mary Wilson
  • Pedro Ferrer
  • Sherry Payne

Share Page

Publication: Cedar Rapids Gazette

Location: Cedar Rapids, Iowa

Issue Date: February 4, 1974

RealCheck